February 8th, 2016

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Carlos Santana, “Willie Nelson’s also a pretty mean guitar player”

February 8th, 2016

“Willie Nelson’s impact on American music is indelible. He stands at the crossroads of all the sounds and colors of this country. What he reflects is true soul and sincerity. He’s also a pretty mean guitar player.”

— Carlos Santana

Paula Nelson and Willie Nelson, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”

February 8th, 2016

Willie Nelson & Family and Old Crow Medicine Show to Headline Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que Music Festival in Evans, GA (May 27, 28)

February 8th, 2016

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Willie Nelson And Family, Old Crow Medicine Show
When: Friday, May 27 & Saturday, May 28 – Memorial Day Weekend
Where: Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd. – Evans, GA
www.banjobque.com

Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que Music Festival is excited to announce the full lineup of artists that will play at the 7th Annual Event during Memorial Day Weekend, Friday, May 27 and Saturday, May 28 at Evans Towne Center Park. The 2016 lineup includes:  Willie Nelson And Family – Old Crow Medicine Show – Steep Canyon Rangers Blitzen Trapper – Mountain Faith – Sarah Jaroz – Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band – Susto – Ben Miller
Have Gun Will Travel – Guthrie Brown & The Family Tree – Little Roy & Lizzie Show – Great Peacock – Josh Roberts & The Hinges – Motel Radio – Packway Handle Band – Laney Jones & The Spirits BooHoo Ramblers – Georgia-Lina Boys – The Mason Jars – Muddy Johnson – Delta Cane

Once again, the Grammy Award winning group, Old Crow Medicine Show will be bringing their magic back to the Banjo-B-Que. The band was on the very first Banjo-B-Que lineup back in 2010 and this will be their 4th time as a headliner. We are also very excited to have Willie Nelson And Family for the first time at Banjo-B-Que.

The festival this year will bring several new bands to this area and will up the total band count to 22 for 2016! In addition to the many great artists you can see on stage, we are proud to once again feature a Kansas City Barbeque Society sanctioned barbecue competition. Professional barbecue cookers from across the country will compete for $40,000 in prize money. We will also host a large variety of craft beer for our adult patrons. There will be plenty of activities for the kids to enjoy including a petting zoo, pig races, face painting and much more!

Weekend passes will go on sale Monday, February 8 at banjobque.com. Weekend passes are available for $60. Kids 12 and under are free with a ticketed adult. VIP Weekend Festival passes are available for $325. VIP includes barbecue, beer, preferential viewing and bathrooms. Please visit the website for other available ticket outlets. Daily passes will be available at a later date and any remaining tickets will be sold at the gate.

Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que Music Festival came to life in 2010 to honor Joe Pond, who gave so much to his community. Feel-good music,
southern barbecue & most of all a family atmosphere were a few of the things Joe Pond enjoyed and loved sharing with his family. All
proceeds benefit the Joseph R. Pond Memorial Foundation. In 2015, the foundation donated $46,000 to local charities in the CSRA.
Join us Memorial Day Weekend, May 27 & 28 at Evans Towne Center Park in Evans, GA for the 7th Annual Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que &
Music Festival! We’ll have some of the best roots, rock and bluegrass music you can find, finger-lickin’ good barbecue, a large selection
of craft beer, a petting zoo, pig races, and so much more.

February 7th, 2016

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Paula Nelson on Sirius/XM Radio on Willie’s RoadHouse every night! (except Tuesday)

February 7th, 2016

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Congratulations Paula Nelson!

She has taken over weeknight evenings at SiriusXM Willie’s Roadhouse, broadcasting from the SiriusXM studios on Willie Nelson Blvd. in Austin, TX every Monday-Thursday 6 pm-midnight ET.  That’s except for Tuesday night, when the Grand Ole Opry replays at 10:00 pm EG.

This is a great reason to subscribe to Sirius/XM Radio!  Check their website; they have lots of deals.  You can listen just on-line, too, if you want to, which is only about $15.00 a month.

www.SiriusXM.com

If you are looking for Paula Nelson’s music:

“I have received a lot of emails asking about my own music and where to get it. There are 5CD’s total available on ITunes and CD baby. This is the latest one titled “Under the Influence”

They are great songs from some of my greatest influences.. Thanks again for all of the well wishes.. Much love to all of you!” —

— Paula Nelson

Paula Nelson's photo.

 

Willie Nelson H & R Block Superbowl Ad

February 7th, 2016

Yeah, it’s that day again when I post all the Willie Nelson Superbowl stuff I can find! And Go Broncos!

Willie Nelson Pick of the Day: Super Bowl XLII

February 7th, 2016

Willie Nelson’s Teatro

February 7th, 2016

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I listened to this album over and over while I worked yesterday.  It’s that kind of an album, you can’t get enough, it’s so beautiful. Originally released only on cd by Island Records in 1998, last year the album was made available on vinyl, on Record Store Day.  The artwork, yellow record, and even liner notes are all so beautiful.

 Here’s a track from the album:

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FROM THE LINER NOTES:  “TEATRO”:

On February 6, 2014, we were lucky enough to share a few minutes with Willie Nelson and Daniel Lanois, reminiscing about the good ol’ days of Teatro. Below is what unfolded. A big thank you to both Willie and Daniel, along with Seth Loeser, Meredith Louie, Henry Owings, Mark Rothbaum and Elaine Schock for making this possible.

— Matt Sullivan and Patrick McCarthy

WILLIE: Hey, Daniel. How you ‘doin?

DANIEL: Oh, Willie, I’m good. Nice to hear your voice. Are you on the road?

W: Yeah, we’re uh… somewhere out here. I think we’re in Oklahoma.

D: Right, right, right. Well, that’s good. Looks like we’re gonna put a little bit of life back into Teatro. That’s great, isn’t it?

W: Well, yeah. Heck yeah.

LIGHT IN THE ATTIC: To start, how’d the record come about?

W: Daniel, what do you remember about how it came about?

D: I’m sure Mr. Rothbaum was at the helm, but all business aside, when we decided to make the record, I wanted to make sure that Willie felt comfortable in the studio and that it did not feel like a usual recording session. I met Willie in Las Vegas, and we rode on his bus to California, where at the time I had the Teatro Recording Studios, an old cinema in Oxnard. We rode from Vegas, and Emmylou Harris joined us on the bus, and we went over some of the material on the bus.

I kept in touch with my crew back in California to make sure that the studio had a nice dance hall feeling because I talked with Willie on the bus, I said, “What was it like when you were getting started man?” He said, “Well, we were kind of a dance band, and people just were providing music for people on the weekends to dance to and have a nice time.”

And I thought, wouldn’t it be nice to provide this tone for Willie? Have a kind of dance hall feeling in the place. So I set up three little stages — one for WIllie, one for Emmy, one for me. And then two drummers. It was a very beautiful, almost like a Cuban nightclub setting. And I think that really helped to set the tone of this album. Whatya think, Willie?

W: Yeah, that’s exactly it. And of course Emmylou was fantastic. We did a video, too. What song was the video, do you remember?

D: Well, we filmed the whole things with Wim Wenders.

W: Yeah, that’s right. Wenders.

D: It’s a beautiful film that goes with the whole thing. It never got aired a lot, but maybe we should try and knock on somebody’s door and say this is a good time to play the film. [laughs].

W:  You’re absolutely right.  Yeah, I think it deserves to have a chance out there.

D:  Yeah.  It was really a lovely, harmonious process.  I was happy to be on Willie’s bus.  We were just chillin’ and workin’ out the songs.  When I got to the destination, I made a decision to ask Willie to… the theatre had a nice parking lot, so there was plenty of room outside.  We sorta camped out outside, and Willie had his trailer there.  I just wanted to make sure that we didn’t burn out Willie, so I said to him, “Don’t even be in in the studio.  You stay out on the truck, and I’ll come out and get you, so that when you come in everything’s gonna be fresh.”  So I was rehearsing the band on the inside, and when I felt like the moment would strike, I’d go out and get Willie, and we’d get it in one or two takes.  [laughs]  We did that whole record in four days!

W:  Well, you know, when you’re having fun it don’t take long.

LITA:  Well said!  Willie, what are some of your memories of the album and the recording session?

W:  Well, I remember that we had some great rhythms there — I think two drummers and maybe a couple of bass players.  I’m not sure.  Who all played bass?  Did we have two or just one?

D:  No, no, no, Willie.  I played the bass.  I overdubbed the bass after!  So we had the two drummers, and then we had two keyboard players.  We had Aaron Embry, and then from Toronto a guy named Brian Griffiths on the guitar, the great slide player.  I think bass players must make too many mistakes, so I knew the arrangements, so I overdubbed the bass myself.

W:  Well, it turned out great.  I liked it.  I think it should have had a bigger run back there.  It was kinda quick — it came and went pretty quick, but maybe it’ll get another shot.

D:  Yeah, maybe it’ll get another shot.  And Willie, you’re absolutely right.  There was a very rhythmic foundation that we laid out which was petty sweet.  Those two great drummers, Victor Indrizzo and Tony Mangurian.  There was some kind of genius in inviting these two guys because one is a left-handed drummer and the other ne is a right-handed drummer, so they could sit at one big drum kit together and not get in anybody’s way!

[both laugh]

The one guy’s high hat is on the left, the other guy’s on the right.  it was pretty fucking funny.  But because they were literally sitting together, their rhythms were locked, so we had some very nice grooves going.  It’s hard to describe the full sensation of it.

W:  The theatre where we shot it, too, was perfect.  There was a great feel.  It was like a big nightclub or dance hall.

D:   Exactly.

LITA:  One of our favorite songs on the record is one that you wrote, Danel — the song, “The Maker.”  It’s a song that really captures the cinematic expansiveness of the album.

W:  I love, “The Maker.”

LITA:  It’s so cinematic and big.

D:  The good thing about “The Maker” is… I thought it was a good song for Willie because it gave him an opportunity to play with the phrasing.  The lyric lines are quite brief:  [sings] “Oh, deep water, black and cold like the night,” so it’s not a soaring melody.  It’s more of a standing melody, and I think that really suits Willie’s way of looking at vocal phrasing.  Willie, thanks for doing the song, man.

W:  Well, it was a lot of fun to sing.

LITA:  It’s been sixteen years now — what do you guys think of the record?  Do you feel it stands up?

W:  Definitely.  I’m just glad to see some folks payin’ attention to it again and thinkin’ about puttin’ it out there again.  It certainly deserves another shot.

D:  Is it sixteen years already?

LITA:  Yeah, 1998!

D:  Oh boy.  Well listen man, we have no shortage of passion and power and devotion to the music, s if an opportunity comes upt for us to go another rund sometime, Willie can count on me, how ’bout that?

W:  Well, you can count on me, too.  I’d love to do it.  Sounds like a good plan.

LITA:  That was our next question, so thank you!

D:  Well, we’re very driven by quality and magic.  I mean, we hope t get it… It helps when people are talented  [laughs], so we had a little bit f an advantage.  I think we had Mr. Nelsn in there on the vocals, so we had a pretty good chance.

LITA:  Any thoughts, Willie, on maybe performing the album live one of these days?

W:  Oh, that would be great.  I would be glad to do that sometime.  When it comes out, if we can promote it someway and showcase it, I think that would be a good idea.

LITA:  Maybe back at the theatre!  I think it’s for rent again. I eventually moved outta there.  It’s been a church since we had it, Willie, but I saw a “For Rent” sign on it, so…

LITA:  Well, the sound you guys got there was just magical.  We’re so thankful for your time and for your music.  You’ve brought a lot of happiness to us over the years, so thank you.

W:  Thank you very much.  It was good to hear from you, my friend.

D:  Willie, nice to hear your voice, and I’m looking forward to putting a little bit of juice back into Teatro, so if you get any additional ideas, gimme a call, ok?

W:  All right, same to you.

LITA:  Thanks so much.

D:  Thank you so much for your time, guys.

Willie Nelson Randy Travis, “Birth of the Blues”

February 7th, 2016

“We’re all the same.” — Willie Nelson

February 6th, 2016

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Willie Nelson on Texas, touring and Taxes (Country Weekly) (June 2000)

February 6th, 2016

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Country Weekly
June 13, 2000

“This is your cotton pickin’, snuff dippin’, tobacco chewin’, stump jumpin’, gravy soppin’, coffee pot dodgin’, dumplin’ eating, frog giggin’ hillbilly from Hill County, Willie Nelson. Stay tuned.”

Brown eyes crinkling with laughter, Willie is reciting his 1954 radio mantra as he unwinds on his famous Honeysuckle Rose tour bus.

”When I was a Texas deejay, that on-air intro made it hard for listeners to mix me up with anyone else,” he tacks on with a chuckle. Talk about your understatement. As Willie has rolled down life’s highway doing things his way and no one else’s, not one soul has ever mistaken his distinctive nasal-tinged Texas twang for anyone else’s. Not even the ones who, early on, loved his songwriting and hated his voice, declaring he’d never make it as singer.

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In a recording career spanning five decades and more than 100 albums, Wille made history with Red Headed Stranger, the ground-breaking Old Westconcept album his record company originally “didn’t get”—but the rest of the world did—andWanted: The Outlaws, the first country album to sell a million copies. His collection of pop standards, Stardust, was on the Billboard charts for an incredible 11 years!

Willie’s sang with just about everybody: Frank Sinatra, Luciano Pavarotti, Dolly Parton, Ray Charles, Julio Iglesias, Bob Dylan, B.B. King, George Jones, Leon Russell and Lefty Frizzell. And, as part of the Highwaymen, he recorded and toured with Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson.

Whether you know him as a singer, songwriter, actor, champion of American farmers, the fella who elevated Fourth of July picnics to an art form, or the industrious chap who recorded The IRS Tapes/Who’ll Buy My Memories album to pay off back taxes, Willie has always been as unique as a fingerprint.

So how does it feel to be a musical icon? ”I have to go look it up,” he says, deflecting the compliment with whimsey. “I forget what it means every time.”

Even though his face reflects the chiseled character usually embossed on a nickel, Willie is completely unassuming. He’s just plain ol’ Willie, still the kid from Abbott, Texas, who made it out of the cotton fields. It’s clear he’s as comfortable hanging out with cowboys as with kings. He’s certainly done it all.

Along the way, Willie’s kept grounded by creating two worlds. One is the bus adorned with the “Comanche At Sunset” mural that’s parked this steamy night outside Fort Worth’s famous mega-honky tonk Billy Bob’s Texas, where the bandana-wearing songman has just slap-dab wore out a wall-to-wall crowd with a rollicking two-hour concert. The bus lets him live out every word of “On The Road Again,” the anthem he wrote on the back of an airline barf bag.

The other carefully-crafted universe is Willie World, his ranch house, golf course, studio and replica of a 1880s western town outside Austin. He’s dubbed the replica as Luck, Texas. It’s been the backdrop for numerous films and videos. “Either you’re in Luck,” Willie drawls, “or you’re out of Luck.”

Willie feels equally comfortable in both worlds, where he and his extended family of road warriors can live and play. “I’ve been fortunate to find people who are easy to travel with and easy live with,” he explains, adding, “and who can also play great music.”

Willie’s loyalty is legendary. He has employees who’ve been with him for more than 40 years. Until a few months ago, the “newest” member of his Family Band was a 27-year veteran. When the crew’s bus recently wracked up 1 million miles on the road, it did so with the same driver for every mile.

And Trigger, the Martin guitar in which he’s worn a hole with his pick, has been his faithful sidekick for 35 years. When his home outside Nashville caught fire in 1970, Willie rushed passed firefighters to rescue a guitar case from the blaze. The case contained his beloved Trigger and a load of marijuana. “Stress medicine,” Willie clarifies.

Though the multiple-Grammy winner will perform more than 200 dates this year in every corner of the United States and Europe, he keeps coming back to the state he loves. “I can be on the bus sound asleep in the middle of the night and I know when we cross into Texas,” he confides. “I wake up with the incredibly good feeling of ’Well, we’re back.’

”And I still love Abbott. I head back as often as I can to play poker with the guys there. ”Then when the bus pulls onto the road leading up to my Austin ranch, a peace floods over me. My house there, like the ones I have in Hawaii and Abbott, are my ’hospital zones.’ That’s where I go to heal and get ready for life’s next battle.”

As Willie pours another cup of coffee, the conversation shifts to country music’s current battle.

”It always goes through phases,” he declares. “Right now it’s going through a slow period where everyone sounds a lot alike and the music is watered down. But somebody different will come along and wake ’em up.” Is there anyone out there giving country its wake-up call?

”There are a few stepping out,” ventures Willie. “Pat Green is a tremendous Texas singer-songwriter who’s been overlooked. There are others out there being overlooked. Pretty soon you’ll start hearing about them. Then—boom!—they’ll be the traditional stars of tomorrow. They’ll be the Kris Kristoffersons and Billy Joe Shavers.”

Willie says new songs will also rise to the top, but not as many as before. This October marks 25 years since “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” soared to No. 1. “If you look at all the No. 1 songs through the years, there are some that last and others that don’t. The percentage of really good songs was better in past years.

”Don’t get me wrong,” he adds. “Songwriters today are good, but I don’t think you could come up with a group to match Hank Williams, Lefty Frizzell, Floyd Tillman, Leon Payne—those guys turned out songs that’ll last forever.” And though he doesn’t admit it, so did Willie. Besides his own hits, he penned “Crazy” for Patsy Cline, “Night Life” for Ray Price and “Hello Walls” for Faron Young.

Later this year, Willie hits another milestone. On September 16, he and his fourth wife, Annie, will celebrate their 9th anniversary. “We’re going to have one—I hope we celebrate,” he quips. “Just kiddin’, Annie,” he deadpans. He’s candid about what’s kept the marriage together.

”The fact I’m gone a lot, probably,” he offers. “We’re always glad to see each other, and that helps. I always hate to leave, and that helps. We have two great boys, Lukas, 11, and Micah, 10, we’re raising, and they keep me comin’ back home.”

Stroking his beard, he admits, “It’s a day-to-day challenge to always try to do the right thing. I’m not talking about adultery—it’s a little late in my life to worry about that. I’m talking about being there for Annie and the boys when they need me and being there when I need them.” He pulls a drawing from the front of the refrigerator and proudly holds it up. It’s the sketch of a cow. “Micah did the artwork for the cover of the new Milk Cow Blues album that comes out in August. He’s very artistic.”

Willie just crossed another milestone, his 67th birthday, on April 30.

”I feel great—everything’s working,” he declares with a boisterous laugh. “I still do yoga, runing and breathing exercises. And I’ve done tai kwon do for a long time. Now my whole family’s doing it. Annie and the boys are black belt candidates. So I have to keep up—out of self defense!”

”I’m mellower and more moderate now. I’ve learned to savor things. I haven’t quit a lot of things, but I’ve sure slowed down.”

Maybe so, but not in his music. To reach new audiences, he’s agreed to be one of the opening acts on the red-hot Dixie Chicks’ just-launched Fly tour. And he recently released a trio of CDs: Night & Day is his first instrumental album; Honky Tonk Heroes showcases himself, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson and Billy Joe Shaver; and It Could Have Been Tonight, a double-CD live album recorded during last year’s tour.

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In addition to this summer’s Milk Cow Blues, featuring Willie and such blues greats as B.B. King, there’s Willie’s tribute to Hank Williams, Memories Of Hank, coming later in the year. Along with Bob Wills and Ernest Tubb, Hank had been one of the country crooners flowing out of the Nelson family radio when Willie was a scrawny kid working the cotton fields. One day, he recalls, his fingers were aching and bloody from jabs by the razor-edged cotton bolls. His shirt was drowning in sweat as the thermometer pumped past 100 degrees.

Suddenly, a flash of light from the nearby highway caught his eyes. It was sunlight glancing off a Cadillac barreling down the asphalt. Squinting, he watched it disappear over a hill. His dreams were hitched to the Caddy’s bumper. ”Seeing those fancy cars,” he says, “I knew there had to be a better deal than picking cotton.” Willie says these words with the same certainty that even a broken clock proclaims the time correctly twice a day. “And I hoped that deal involved music.”

Hallelujah for country music, it did.

New Non-Fiction: Willie Nelson, “It’s a Long Story: My Life” @BoulderBookStore

February 6th, 2016

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Always fun to see Willie Nelson’s book on the shelf.  Boulder Bookstore has it front and center, so you walk by  and there he is.

Willie Nelson featured in, “A Song for You: The Austin City Limits Story”

February 6th, 2016

www.TasteofCountry.com
by: Annie Reuter

Willie Nelson gives back to a show that has helped him throughout his career in a new documentary called A Song For You: The Austin City Limits Story. The singer sings Austin City Limit‘s praises in the film, which will premiere at the 2016 South by Southwest Festival in Nelson’s own Austin, Texas, next month.

Described as “the ultimate backstage pass to 40 years of incredible music,” the two-and-a-half minute trailer highlights four decades of music from the longest-running music show in television history. The film features interviews with producers and artists, as well as showcases some of the legendary performances throughout the past 40 years. Appearances in the film are made by Nelson, Beck, Bonnie Raitt, Jeff Tweedy, the Pixies, Loretta Lynn, Ray Charles, Dolly Parton, Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes, Townes Van Zandt, Buddy Guy, Leonard Cohen, Kris Kristofferson, Marcia Ball and many more.

“I’ve been associated with Austin City Limits since the beginning,” Nelson says in the A Song for You trailer. “I did the first show.”

Meanwhile, other artists discuss their nerves to play the historic television show as the tradition it holds is undeniable. The trailer highlights several performances by country legends Nelson, Kristofferson and Merle Haggardas well as Miranda Lambert, Jack White, Coldplay and Dave Grohl.

“I don’t care about being inducted in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,” Grohl says in a clip. “I got to play Austin City Limits.”

Directed by Keith Maitland, the film also discusses the difficulties the show had as one producer admits that each year they never knew if they would be funded. Thankfully, somehow, they always found a way.

“I’m really glad to see it still doing well and getting better all the time,” Nelson concludes.

Willie Nelson to host benefit dinner at Ranch to Benefit Wholesome Wave (March 17, 2016)

February 6th, 2016

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www.thedailymeal.com
by: Karen Lo

All proceeds from the evening, which includes a performance from Nelson himself, will benefit the nonprofit organization Wholesome Wave.

Country music icon and longtime American agriculture supporter Willie Nelson will be hosting a potluck with celebrity chefs at his private ranch near Austin on March 17.

The star-studded feast, which will feature a performance from Nelson himself, will benefit Wholesome Wave, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing Americans’ access to affordable food.

Chef Michel Nischan, the founder of Wholesome Wave and the 2015 winner of the James Beard Foundation’s Humanitarian of the Year award, is co-hosting the potluck alongside his longtime friend, Willie Nelson.

Chef Nischan will be joined by a team of celebrity chefs in charge of the meal, including Scott Conant (Corsair), Michael Chiarello (Bottega, Coqueta), Dean Fearing (Fearing’s), and John Mitchell (Luvo), for the dinner.

The menu, which will feature sustainably raised and sourced ingredients, and will include “Willie’s Chili” and several other Southern-inspired dishes. The potluck will feature ethically sourced meats from Fleisher’s Craft Butchery and spirits from Avion Tequila.

Tickets for the potluck are now available at $375 per guest, though a CharityBuzz auction for two tickets to the dinner, plus front-row seats to Nelson’s performance, is live as of February 4.