Willie Nelson and Bee Spears (Fillmore 2011)

January 22nd, 2020
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Celebrating The Music Of Roger Miller (3/22/20) (Nashville)

January 22nd, 2020

www.Blackbirdpresents.com

Sunday, March 22, 2020, Opry House Nashville, TN

Pre-sale tickets go on sale Wednesday, January 22 at 10 AM CT through Thursday, January 23 at 10 PM CT. Use code “STILLKING” to access pre-sale tickets at ticketmaster.com

King Of The Road: Celebrating The Music Of Roger Miller will take place Sunday, March 22, 2020, at the Opry House in Nashville, TN and will feature performances by country and pop super-stars Willie Nelson, Toby Keith, Trisha Yearwood, Jamey Johnson, Kris Kristofferson, Wynonna, Rodney Crowell, Chris Janson, Lee Ann Womack, Larry Gatlin, Cake, The War And Treaty and more to be announced.

Acclaimed musician, songwriter and GRAMMY® Award-winning producer, Buddy Miller, will be the musical director of this historic event.

Country Music Hall of Fame member Roger Miller is widely regarded as one of the most multifaceted talents that country music has ever seen.

Roger left an astonishing legacy of musical depth and range with hits like “King of the Road”, “Engine Engine #9”, “Kansas City Star”, “Dang Me”, “England Swings”, and “Do-Wacka-Do”.

With eleven GRAMMY® Awards across multiple genres and a Tony® Award for best score of the 1985 Broadway musical Big River, this singer-songwriter, actor, composer, and honky-tonk man’s legacy will live on forever.

Willie Nelson & Family at Municipal Auditorium (January 22, 1977)

January 22nd, 2020

Willie Nelson and Family, Farm Aid 2019

January 22nd, 2020

Willie Nelson & Family (Bend, Oregon)

January 22nd, 2020

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Wanted the Outlaws” goes douple platinum (January 21, 1985)

January 21st, 2020

on January 21, 1985: “Wanted: The Outlaws,” featuring Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser, certifies double-platinum, along with the “Waylon & Willie” album.

In 1976, the album was the first country album to receive the new platinum certification, signifying one million units shipped.

wanted
  1. My Heroes Have Always
  1. My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys (Waylon)
  2. Honky Tonk Heroes (Waylon)
  3. I’m Looking for Blue Eyes (Jessi)
  4. Suspicious Minds (Waylon and Jessi)
  5. Good Hearted Woman (Waylon and Willie)
  6. Heaven or Hell (Waylon and Willie
  7. Me and Paul (Willie)
  8. Yesterday’s Wine (Willie
  9. T for Texas (Tompall)
  10. Put Another Log on the Fire (Tompall)

It’s unfortunate that there still has to be a sampler, or primer, or golden book of some of the best singers working anywhere, but apparently not everyone has gotten the message yet. Maybe this album can introduce you to some people you would have liked to have known sooner but just didn’t have the opportunity to meet.

These are some special people, very special. They’ve been waiting in the wings for years, too many years, to assume their proper places in the structure of American Music. When it became apparent to them that their proper places were perhaps being unduly delayed becasue of certain resentments harbored against them because of their real and imagined unconventionality, they — by God — decided to take matters into their own hands. There resulted a rather difficult period of figurative doors being smashed and general confusion and namecalling in Nashville. When the smoke cleared and the fallout returned to earth, there was effected a major shift in country music. “Progressive Country” (for want of a better term) was on the map, and was here for good. And these are the people responsibile for that. Call them outlaws, call them innovators, call them revolutionaries, call them what you will. They’re just some damned find people who are also some of the most gifted songwriters and singers anywhere.

They are musical rebels, in one sense, in that they challenged the accepted way of doing things. Like all pioneers, they were criticized for that but time has vindicated them.

Tompall Glaser was one of the first in Nashville to chart his own musical course and it was lonely for him for years but now he is beginning to receive the recognition due him.

Waylon Jennings, as the most visible of the progressive country pack, has been quietly fighting for years in his own way for acceptance. Both he and Jessi Colter (who, coincidentally is also known as Mrs. Waylon Jennings) were authentically ahead of thier time. Now, the times have caught up with them.

That streak of rugged individualism that is the unifying bond for these musical outlaws is nowhere more evident than in Willie Nelson’s life and times. Unquestionably one of the finest songwriters who ever lived, Willie was known for years only to other writers and to a slowly growing cult of followers. All that has changed now. “Miracles appear in the strangest of places,” Willie sings in Yesterday’s Wine,” one of my favorites from his collection of remarkable songs, and that’s true. When I first started keeping track of Willie and Waylon and Jessi and Tompall, I (along with their other cult followers) felt almost responsible for them since they weren’t that well known to the public and the music industry as a whole didn’t like to acknowledge them. They didn’t wear Nudie suits and thier music didn’t confirm to the country norm of songs of divorce and alcohol and life’s other little miseries. The only thing that worried me was that I knew these people were born scrappers and really loved fighting for acceptance. What would happen to them, I wondered, when they inevitably won (as I knew they would)? Would they like so many who struggle just for the sake of the struggle, grow fat and lazy when they grew successful?

There was no need to worry. This last year each of them has gotten better, writing better, and singing with breathtaking confidence.

They’re the cutting edge of a brand of American music that I find the most satisfying development in popular music in the past decade. It’s not country and it’s not country-rock, but there’s no real need to worry about labeling it. It’s just damned good music that’s true and honest and you can’t ask for more than that.

Chet Flippo
Associate Editor
Rolling Stone

Winners Wear Wrangler

January 20th, 2020

Willie Nelson was magical in Redding

January 20th, 2020

Willie Nelson ticket for Brown County Music Center sell out in four minutes

January 20th, 2020

www.IndianaPublicMedia.org
by: Kirma Swords Schulz

Tickets for the April 28 Willie Nelson concertat the Brown County Music Center went on sale Friday morning at 10 a.m., and the tickets sold out in a mere four minutes. 

The Facebook group Brown County Matters was abuzz with comments about the speed at which they sold out and the high resale prices of remaining tickets available on Ticketmaster.

Brown County resident Cheryl Vaughan said that she was in the queue to purchase tickets for eight minutes and tried 60 times to get her hands on two.

“It says it’s available and then when I go in there they said sorry someone else got it,” she says of the buying process.

Regular priced tickets ranged from $50-$150 per ticket and resale tickets on Ticketmaster are listed for balcony seats at $173 and front row seats selling for as much as $1,000. 

Many Brown County residents say they feel left out when the big name acts at BCMC sell out so quickly and the only tickets available for purchase are too expensive for most people to afford.

“They’re all $175 and up and it goes up to $1,000 now,” Vaughan says.

WFIU reached out to current director of Brown County Music Center and did not receive a comment by the time of publication.

January 20th, 2020

Willie Nelson & Family in Birmingham (April 22, 2020)

January 20th, 2020

www.al.com
by: Mary Colurso

If you missed Willie Nelson’s last show in the Birmingham area, it’s time to rectify that.

The country star is set to return on April 22 for a performance at the BJCC Concert Hall. Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. concert go on sale today at 10 a.m. CT via Ticketmaster, priced at $39.50-$99.50 plus service charges.

Willie Nelson, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”

January 20th, 2020

www..dukebasketballreport.com
by: J D King

Few songs are as indelibly associated with a single performer as Somewhere Over The Rainbow is with Judy Garland whose rendition in The Wizard Of Oz is unforgettable.

It’s really rare when someone approaches something like that and performs it in a way that’s utterly different and transcendent.

Willie Nelson does that. His version of Somewhere Over the Rainbow is plain and simple. His voice has always been nasally and imperfect, a tendency that got worse as he aged.

But he wraps those imperfections around his brilliant guitar work and together it’s as natural as sitting on the back porch, drinking and listening to a good friend spin art out of nothing.

You couldn’t make a much homier arrangement of this song than Nelson did. There are a lot of musicians on stage here but the focus is on the fiddle and his guitar work, which is vastly underrated. He’s as fine a guitarist as there is.

When you listen to his gorgeous renditions of songs like Someone to Watch Over Me or Blue Skies, or his duets with Ray Charles, or his radical cover of Louis Jordan’s Outskirts Of Town, or his recent classic Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die, featuring Snoop Dogg, you realize that this is a singular talent.

He’s casually deceived us into believing that he’s a country musician when what he really is is is an artistic genius who is capable of absorbing any influence and genially giving it back to us as something that sounds entirely casual.

Of course it’s not. What he does is high art that he presents with that conceit. Blood, sweat and tears built his towering catalogue of work. He has talked of a desperate early point in his career when he went outside and laid in the road and waited for someone to finish him off. It wasn’t easy for him and it took years for people to appreciate his artistry. He won’t be with us much longer so enjoy his sweet, homely interpretation of a classic American song.

When he’s discussed in the future, he’ll be mentioned with the absolute top tier of American musicians, composers and arrangers. He’s that good.

Ladies and gentlemen, the incomparable Willie Nelson.

January 19th, 2020

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Willie and Family Live” #1 (January 18, 1979)

January 18th, 2020

On January 18, 1979, “Willie and Family Live” was at #1 on the country music album chart. The double album was recorded live at Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Nevada in April 1978. EmmyLou Harris and Johnny Paycheck are featured on the album.

Side one
“Whiskey River” – 3:40
“Stay All Night (Stay a Little Longer)” – 3:24
“Funny How Time Slips Away” – 2:45
“Crazy” – 1:47
“Night Life” – 3:55
“If You’ve Got the Money (I’ve Got the Time)” – 1:44
“Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys” – 3:33
“I Can Get Off on You” – 2:06

Side two
“If You Could Touch Her at All” – 3:00
“Good Hearted Woman” – 2:57
“Red Headed Stranger Medley” 14:25
Incl:
“Time of the Preacher” – 2:13
“I Couldn’t Believe It Was True” – 1:03
“Medley: Blue Rock Montana/Red Headed Stranger” – 2:40
“Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” – 2:29
“Red Headed Stranger” – 4:31
4. “Under the Double Eagle” – 2:43

Side three
“Till I Gain Control Again” – 5:59
“Bloody Mary Morning” – 3:33
“I’m a Memory” – 1:52
“Mr. Record Man” – 2:01
“Hello Walls” – 1:29
“One Day at a Time” – 2:05
“Will the Circle Be Unbroken” – 2:18
“Amazing Grace” – 5:12

Side four
“Take This Job and Shove It” – 2:52
“Uncloudy Day” – 3:40
“The Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line” – 1:29
“A Song for You” – 2:43
“Roll in My Sweet Baby’s Arms” – 1:56
“Georgia on My Mind” – 4:09
“I Gotta Get Drunk” – 1:22
“Whiskey River” – 2:42
“The Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line” – 2:12

January 17th, 2020

www.siriusxm.com/williesroadhouse