Archive for the ‘Birthdays’ Category

Nathaniel Rateliff’s Birthday Tribute to Willie Nelson

Sunday, June 7th, 2020

Nathaniel Rateliff announces the latest installment of The Marigold Singles and birthday tribute to Willie Nelson featuring guests Bobbie Nelson, Mickey Raphael, Lukas and Micah Nelson, Nikki Lane, Courtney Marie Andrews, members of The Night Sweats and more. Stream/Buy “Willie’s Birthday Song” here: https://found.ee/NRWilliesBirthdaySong

Video Directed by Rett Rogers
Edited by Matt Wade
Produced by The Marigold Project

Order/Stream latest album “And It’s Still Alright”: https://found.ee/NRAndItsStillAlright…
Store: https://found.ee/NRAndItsStillAlright…
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Amazon Music: https://found.ee/NRAndItsStillAlright…

Follow Nathaniel Rateliff:
Official Website: http://nathanielrateliff.com/
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Lyrics:
Pass me that joint it’s Willie’s birthday
Wipe away all of your tears
Well the worlds gone crazy
But we still got Willie and all the good things he’s done for us here
It was 75 the time of the preacher
when the red headed stranger appeared
Rode into town blue eyes a shining
And his memories measure in tears
Hey Nashville, Hey Austin
He’s singing the songs we hold dear
Now for all of these years
Pass me that joint it’s Willie’s birthday
Wipe away all of your tears
Well the worlds gone crazy
But we still got Willie and all the good things he’s done for us here
Now shotgun Willie wades through whiskey rivers
Living in the promise land
His heroes are cowboys and the songs there a singing
Bring joy and laughter again
Hey Georgia, New Orleans
This songs for your native son and all that he’s done
Pass me that joint it’s Willie’s birthday
Wipe away all of your tears
Well the worlds gone crazy
But we still got Willie and all the good things he’s done for us here
Pass me that joint it’s Willie’s birthday
Wipe away all of your tears
Well the worlds gone crazy
But we still got Willie and all the good things he’s done for us here

#NathanielRateliff #WilliesBirthdaySong #MarigoldSingles

Music video by Nathaniel Rateliff performing Willie’s Birthday Song. © 2020 Stax Records, Distributed by Concord.

Willie Nelson on Austin City Limits

Saturday, May 2nd, 2020

www.faroutmagazine.co.uk
by: Joe Taysom

Willie Nelson celebrates his 87th birthday April 30thth so Austin City Limits have shared rare footage of him appearing on their show all the way back in 1976.

Nelson’s wonderful appearance was recorded on October 4th, 1976, and saw the singer accompanied by his family band for a performance of 1975’s Red Headed Stranger from front to back. The episode originally aired as the first episode of Austin City Limits’ second season in 1977 some months after it’s recording and was Nelson’s second appearance on the show after he performed during the pilot episode.

Viewers are encouraged to donate to Farm Aid and it is available to watch now on YouTube following it’s premiere at 4:20 CT yesterday. The timing of the steam is obviously no coincidence, to celebrate 4:20 earlier this month, Nelson hosted a 4-hour-and-20-minute stream which, obviously, will be taking place at 4:20pm, will broadcast via Luck Reunion’s Twitch account in association with Nelson’s Willie Reserve cannabis line.

Nelson, longtime associated with cannabis culture and advocate for the legalisation of marijuana, established his of his own marijuana brand, Willie’s Reserve, the moment weed was legalised in different states across America. “I wouldn’t be alive. It saved my life, really,” he once told Rolling Stone about the impacts of pot. “I wouldn’t have lived 85 years if I’d have kept drinking and smoking like I was when I was 30, 40 years old. I think that weed kept me from wanting to kill people. And probably kept a lot of people from wanting to kill me, too — out there drunk, running around.”

Stream the 1976 show below and feel free to donate if you can afford it.

Edie Brickell and Willie Nelson, “Sing to Me Willie”

Saturday, May 2nd, 2020

Proceeds from the collab, released in honor of Nelson’s birthday, benefit MusiCares’ COVID-19 Relief Fund

www.RollingStone.com
by: Claire Shaffer

You’d be hard-pressed to find a country artist or songwriter working today who hasn’t been personally affected by Willie Nelson’s music. In honor of the legendary outlaw’s 87th birthday, Edie Brickell has shared her own musical tribute, “Sing to Me, Willie.”

The song captures just how personal Brickell’s relationship is to Nelson’s work, right from the get-go: “We played your music at my daddy’s funeral/And the pastor was amused.” Nelson himself then joins Brickell in a duet, crooning about the untamed beauty of Texas. It’s a touching homage to Nelson, his home state, and his legacy of storytelling that artists like Brickell carry on.

“On Christmas Day, 2018, Willie asked me to write a song for us to sing together,” Brickell said. “What a gift! My father and Texas are my biggest connections to Willie. I never hear his voice without loving memories of people and places back home. If only my dad could have heard this song.”

“Sing to Me, Willie” was recorded at Arlyn Studios in Austin, and features members of Brickell’s band the New Bohemians, including John Bush (percussion), Brad Houser (bass), and Kenny Withrow (electric guitar), as well as Kyle Crusham on acoustic guitar and Matt Hubbard on keyboards. All proceeds from the song will benefit MusiCares’ COVID-19 Relief Fund.

Listen to Willie’s Roadhouse free on SiriusXM to celebrate Willie Nelson’s birthday

Thursday, April 30th, 2020

For the love of Willie — Happy Birthday!

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

www.hppr.org
by: Jenny Inzerillo

It’s not often a person gets two birthdays. However, Willie Nelson, one of the most iconic and beloved singer-songwriters living today, is so good he’s worth celebrating twice. Yes, the Red Headed Stranger came into the world just before midnight on April 29, but the Hill County courthouse in Abbott, Texas failed to record his birth until the following morning. (Hey, things moved pretty slowly in 1933.) So we get two days to love on Willie!  Well, this year, to kick off day one, High Plains Public Radio will be carrying a one-hour special called “For the Love of Willie,” at 11:00 am CT on Wednesday, April 29th. 

To toast his 87 fabulous years, High Plains Morning will dedicate the final hour to one of the legends of country music. Join John Spong and Willie Nelson biographer Joe Nick Patoski as they present you with some Willie songs you’ve probably never heard before, and others you might not have noticed. Among their playlist, you can hear songs like “Columbus Stockade Blues (#2),” “Dreaming Of A Little Cabin,” and “Nine Pound Hammer.” Produced by KUTX in Austin, in partnership with Texas Monthly, don’t miss “For the Love of Willie” on Wednesday at 11:00 am CT on High Plains Public Radio. 

Produced by Art Levy // KUTX

Recorded and mixed by Brian Standefer // Texas Monthly

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

via GIPHY

Happy birthday, Willie Nelson, the world is such a better place with you in it

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020
opening

Happy birthday, Willie Nelson

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Happy birthday, Willie

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Happy birthday, Willie, from all the girls who love you

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020
BY30

Happy Birthday, Willie Nelson

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Ryan Adams
@TheRyanAdams

Happy Birthday @WillieNelson
The soundtrack of my GMa’s house & one of the greatest songwriters in this entire galaxy!!!

View image on Twitter

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Happy birthday, Willie, from Minneapolis

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Janine in Minnesota celebrates the holiday every year at work.

Happy birthday, Micah Nelson

Saturday, April 25th, 2020
2015heartbreakerjanis16

photos: Janis Tillerson

Janis Tillerson took this photo, in Luck, Texas

Micah and his big brother, at Red Rocks.

micahmag2

Texas Music

November 2014

Micah Nelson: When It Comes to Willie Nelson’s Youngest Son, expect the unexpected
by Steve Uhler

Micah Nelson has been screwing with everyone’s expectations since before he was even born.

His dad originally wanted to name him Jake — a “cowboy name” — but the still-gestating prodigy had other ideas. “Apparently, when my mother was pregnant with me, she had a dream in which I came to her and said, “Hey, listen. I’m gonna be showing up soon, so I want to let you know ahead of time. My name is Micah. You can call me whatever you want, but that’s my name. Micah. OK, great — see you soon.” Then she woke up and turned to my dad and said, ‘Hey, uh… so his name is Micah, apparently.”

“That wasn’t enough convincing, however. “They settled on Jacob, Jake for short,” he continues. “But then I showed up and said my name is Micah. Only doctors and cops and people at the DMV call me Jacob.”

Anyone expecting Willie Nelson’s youngest son to reflect the spitting image of his iconic father is likely to be simultaneously disappointed and amazed. Flying in the face of preconceptions — ore -re-anything — is a lifelong motif for the 24-year-old musician. his music is as similar to his dad’s as John Cage is to Johnny Cash. Same canvas, wildly different colors. “Micah has never followed the herd in anything he odes,” says his older brother, Lukas. “To follow any formula would limit him, which he knows. He’s as unique as he is creative.”

Even as a toddler, Nelson was messing with people’s heads. “I started playing harmonica in my dad’s band when I was about three,” he recalls. “I thought I was just getting harmonica lessons. I was oblivious to the thousands of people watching. My Aunt Robyn asked me if I was nervous in front of all those people? I said, “If I don’t see them, they can’t see me.’ Eventually I got pretty decent at the harmonica, and my dad would throw me the nod to take a solo or two.”

Like his iconoclastic father, Nelson does things his own way — and he does a lot of things. In addition to being a full-time musician, both with his band, Insects vs Robots, and as a solo artist, he’s an accomplished painter, photographer, filmmaker and animator. Imagine H.R. Giger channeling John Audobon at a seance with David Lynch, and you’ll get some idea of Nelson’s vision.

As a musician, he eschews the formulaic and polished in favor of the ragged, unformed and spontaneous. As such a conduit as a creator, Nelson conjures “found sounds” into complex musical works of astonishing depth, imagery and surprising humor. An intuitive sonic forager, he finds inspiration in serendipitous places: the rhythm drip of a leaky faucet, the arthritic, groan of an old rocking chair, the distant howl of hungry coyotes in the night. “When I was in high school, every morning on Maui I’d wake up to the most psychedelic bird calls right outside my window,” he recalls. “the weirdest riffs. A human couldn’t write those melodies. I had a growing suspicion that all birds were just musical robots flying around with little tape decks built into them with old warped tapes that would loop the strangest, tweekiest sounds.”

So do inanimate objects, “I know a guy named Lewellyn with an old creaky rusty cat,” he continues. “Every time he opens his door it sings the strangest creaky melodies. I”ve ripped his car’s riffs off countless times. Sometimes I see music as this mysterious forest to be explored. Or like archeaology. You never know what treasures and artifacts you might find, but you can’t know unless you start digging.”

Nelson meticulously builds layers of tracks, weaving a tapestry of songs that are often otherworldly. Anyone expecting echoes of his dad’s distinctive voice and mainstream op sensibilities will find Nelson’s oeuvre disorienting. It’s a beguiling mash-up of traditional folk, psychedelia and world beat, peppered with guileless vocals, dissonant chordings and shifting time signatures. It’s musical Chaos Theory.

“A lot of popular music is so safe, so predictable, like it was processed in a factory,” he explains. “You can literally go in and buy it at Target next to the Tupperware. Not that there’s anything wrong with that .. except that a lot of it tends to sound like Tupperware. Some folks want ot make a pop hit that sells deodorant and plays every five minutes at Walgreens and gets them a Super Bowl halftime show. I tend to get bored with that intention. It spooks my horse.” Perhaps the closest he’s ever come to a traditional love song is “Mosquito,” his bizarre ode to the pesky insect.

micahmag3
http://store.txmusic.com/Departments/TxM-Back-Issues.aspx?sortorder=2&page=4

For the love of Willie — Happy Birthday Willie!

Monday, April 20th, 2020

www.www.hppr.org
by: Jenny Inzerillo

It’s not often a person gets two birthdays. However, Willie Nelson, one of the most iconic and beloved singer-songwriters living today, is so good he’s worth celebrating twice. Yes, the Red Headed Stranger came into the world just before midnight on April 29, but the Hill County courthouse in Abbott, Texas failed to record his birth until the following morning. (Hey, things moved pretty slowly in 1933.)

So we get two days to love on Willie!  Well, this year, to kick off day one, High Plains Public Radio will be carrying a one-hour special called “For the Love of Willie,” at 11:00 am CT on Wednesday, April 29th. 

To toast his 87 fabulous years, High Plains Morning will dedicate the final hour to one of the legends of country music. Join John Spong and Willie Nelson biographer Joe Nick Patoski as they present you with some Willie songs you’ve probably never heard before, and others you might not have noticed. Among their playlist, you can hear songs like “Columbus Stockade Blues (#2),” “Dreaming Of A Little Cabin,” and “Nine Pound Hammer.” Produced by KUTX in Austin, in partnership with Texas Monthly, don’t miss “For the Love of Willie on Wednesday at 11:00 am CT on High Plains Public Radio. 

Produced by Art Levy // KUTX

Recorded and mixed by Brian Standefer // Texas Monthly