Archive for the ‘Albums’ Category

Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, “Django and Jimmie”

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

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Willie Nelson featured on new Aaron Lewis album, “Sinner”

Saturday, June 25th, 2016

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www.tasteofcounry.com
by:  Anna Reuters

Aaron Lewis will release his first album for Dot Records this fall. Titled Sinner, the 11-track album includes a cameo from Willie Nelson on the title track as well as a cover of Chris Stapleton‘s “Whiskey and You.”

The album was produced by Buddy Cannon (George Strait, Merle Haggard, George Jones) and recorded over 16 hours at Nashville’s Blackbird Studios. According to a press release, Sinner “captures Lewis’ mindset, a laid back soundtrack that is reminiscent of the genre’s most honest and musically adventurous artists.”

“I’d like to think that Sinner is a newer take on classic, traditional Outlaw Country, Waylon and Merle and Willie, and Hank Jr. and Johnny Cash and all that stuff,” Lewis says. “That was the music I heard a kid, and that’s the country music that permeated my soul and stuck with me my whole life.”

Sinner is available for pre-order at pledgemusic.com/aaronlewis. Fans attending Lewis’ upcoming tour will get a preview of the album during his set. Every ticket purchased for the tour will also result in a digital download of the Sinner album once it is officially released on Sept. 16.

Aaron Lewis’ Sinner Track Listing

1. “Sinner” (featuring Willie Nelson)
2. “That Ain’t Country”-
3. “Whiskey and You”
4. “Northern Redneck”
5. “Mama”
6. “SundayEvery Saturday Night”
7. “Lost and Lonely”
8. “Story of My Life”
9. “Stuck in These Shoes”
10. “I Lost It All”
11. “Travelin’ Soldier”

Read More: Aaron Lewis to Release ‘Sinner’ Album Feat. Willie Nelson | http://tasteofcountry.com/aaron-lewis-new-album-sinner/?trackback=tsmclip

Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, “Django and Jimmie”

Friday, June 24th, 2016

djwn

I love this album.

Willie Nelson, “The sound in Your Mind”

Saturday, June 18th, 2016

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Willie Nelson, ‘Nacogdoches Sessions’

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

On April 29th, 2007, Willie Nelson and Texas Roadhouse released the Nacogdoches Sessions, a rare and previously unreleased acoustic recording of traditional standards featuring the late legendary players, Paul Buskirk and Paul Schmitt.

These live sessions, recorded in 1997 at Encore Studios in Nacogdoches, TX, are the last recordings Willie would share with his teacher, friend and world renowned mandolin player, Paul Buskirk.

Buskirk dedicated much of his life to music education and the Nacogdoches Sessions will carry on that tradition by creating educational opportunities through scholarships established with record sale proceeds. The Nacogdoches Sessions also represent the only live session recordings of traditional standards performed by Willie Nelson.
Price: $14.99

TRACK LISTING

  • Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone
  • A Dreamer’s Holiday
  • Corine, Corina
  • Walkin’ My Baby Back Home
  • To Each His Own
  • I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself A Letter
  • Golden Earrings
  • Columbus Stockade Blues
  • I Can’t Begin To Tell You
  • I’ll String Along With You
  • I’m Beginning To See The Light
  • How High The Moon
  • Stardust

Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, “Django and Jimmie”

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

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www.RollingStone.com
by:  Chris Parton

Country legends Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard have made their way back to the top of the heap. Their duets album, Django and Jimmie, has debuted at Number One on the Billboard Country Albums chart, and in the Number Seven spot on the all-genre Billboard 200.

Produced by Buddy Cannon and featuring 14 brand new recordings, the album’s title is a reference to Nelson and Haggard’s heroes — jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt and one of country’s first stars, Jimmie Rodgers.

“We’ve been talking about it for about 18 months,” Haggard told Rolling Stone Country about the project back in April. “We’ve been back and forth on the phone about what kind of song we needed to find, and we (even) wrote a couple of songs on the phone. When we got into the studio, it was probably three or four days, max.”

The longtime friends have famously worked together in the past, scoring another Number One album in 1983 with the classic Pancho and Lefty.

“It’s a mutual-admiration society with us,” Nelson said about collaborating with Haggard. “Merle’s one of the best. There’s not anyone out there that can beat him. Maybe Kris Kristofferson. But then you start running out of names.”

The album’s first single is “It’s All Going to Pot,” an obvious allusion to Nelson and Haggard’s well-known fondness for marijuana, but also a riff on current events. The song was written by Cannon, Jamey Johnson and Larry Shell. Haggard and Nelson wrote or co-wrote a combined total of eight of the new tracks.

Speaking with Rolling Stone Country in May, Nelson hinted that a tandem tour could be a possibility, depending on how the album was received.

“In fact, I was talking to some folks today — I was gonna see what they thought of making us do a tour of it when (the album) comes out,” Nelson said. “We ought to do whatever we can get — as many days as we need to, because I know it’s a good record. I think it might sell a couple.”

Willie Nelson, “Summertime”

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

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I love this album.

Willie Nelson, “It Always Will Be”

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

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Bobbie Nelson, Audiobiograpy

Saturday, June 4th, 2016

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www.bobbienelsonmusic.com

Track List:

  1. Back To Earth (With Willie Nelson)
  2. Boogie Woogie
  3. Crazy
  4. Death Ray Boogie
  5. Stardust
  6. The House Of Blue Lights
  7. Deep Purple
  8. 12th Street Rag
  9. Sabor A Mi
  10. Down Yonder
  11. Laura
  12. Until Tomorrow (With Willie Nelson)

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photo:  Todd Wolfson

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Django and Jimmie”, with Merle Haggard, released (June 2, 2016)

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

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On June 2, 2015, “Django and Jimmie” by Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, was released.

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Willie Nelson sings the songs of Cindy Walker

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016


release date: March 14, 2006

Bubbles in My Beer
Not That I Care
Take Me In Your Arms and Hold Me
Don’t be Ashamed of your Age
You Don’t Know Me
Sugar Moon
I Don’t Care
Cherokee Maiden
The Warm Red Wine
Miss Molly
Dusty Skies
It’s All Your Fault
I Was Just Walkin’ Out The Door

Ms. Walker pronounces Mr. Nelson’s latest CD “wonderful.” While she was not directly involved, the disc does feature a number of her peers. The fiddler Johnny Gimble, credited as session leader, played with Wills’s band for many years, in addition to frequent stints with Mr. Nelson. Fred Foster is a close friend of Ms. Walker’s who produced Roy Orbison’s hit version of her “Dream Baby,” as well as her sole LP, the 1964 “Words and Music.” His arrangements on “Songs of Cindy Walker,” which include backing vocals by the Jordanaires, are retro but clean-lined, with a modern use of space.

Cindy Walker

www.NYTimes.com
by Will Hermes
March 13, 2006

At this point, Willie Nelson is a national monument. One of country music’s most fertile songwriters, tireless performers and distinctive vocal interpreters, he is also a longtime ambassador between red and blue states of mind; he has been pals with presidents, allegedly smoked marijuana on the White House roof (and just about everywhere else), founded Farm Aid to assist family farms and recently launched his own biodiesel fuel company.

And Mr. Nelson has made dozens of records and this year he’s on a roll. In addition to campaigning for hurricane relief and the usual endless touring, he has released ” in light of the media attention surrounding the hit film “Brokeback Mountain” a touching version of Ned Sublette’s gay cowboy homage “Cowboys Are Frequently Secretly (Fond of Each Other)” as an exclusive single on iTunes. And this month, Mr. Nelson, 72, will release a record of pop and country classics titled “Songs of Cindy Walker.”

So much for the lethargy of pot smokers.

In addition to being a tremendously likable, laid-back set of classics with jaunty, western swing-flavored arrangements by the veteran Nashville producer Fred Foster, “Songs of Cindy Walker” spotlights another monument of American music, one who might have been forgotten had she ever been properly known in the first place. Ms. Walker, who lives and works in the small East Texas town of Mexia, is a prolific songwriter whose works have been covered by Bing Crosby, Elvis Presley, Ernest Tubb, Roy Orbison and many others. Her tunes ” including “You Don’t Know Me,” “Dream Baby,” “In the Misty Moonlight,” “I Don’t Care” made regular appearances on the top 10 charts beginning in the 1940’s and are still covered today.

With hundreds of recorded songs to her credit, she is known as the dean of Texas songwriting and is generally considered the foremost female composer in country music history; in fact, the late Harlan Howard called her “the greatest living songwriter of country music” and he had some claim to that title himself.

“Her work as a writer, spanning so many decades, and still getting things cut, is unparalleled,” said Eddie Stubbs, country music historian and announcer for the Grand Ole Opry broadcasts on WSM-AM in Nashville. “A lot of the songs she wrote have become standards, although people may not know Cindy Walker wrote them.”

A good example of her direct, finely chiseled art is “You Don’t Know Me.” A hit for Eddy Arnold in 1956, Ray Charles in 1962 and Mickey Gilley in 1981, it was re-recorded by Mr. Charles with Norah Jones for 2004’s best-selling “Genius Loves Company,” and is the lead single for Mr. Nelson’s record. It telegraphs the silent longing of a man for a female friend:

You give your hand to me and then you say hello
And I can hardly speak my heart is beating so
And anyone could tell you think you know me well
But you don’t know me.

Some of Ms. Walker’s best-known songs — “Miss Molly,” “Cherokee Maiden,” “Sugar Moon” â” were written for Bob Wills, a fellow East Texan and master of the country-jazz hybrid known as western swing. In fact, she wrote more than 50 songs for Mr. Wills, the Texas Playboys bandleader.

“Wills was a big hero of mine,” Mr. Nelson said by telephone from his tour bus before a show near Fresno, Calif. “And Cindy is from Mexia, Tex., which is only a few miles from Abbott, where I was born and grew up. I didn’t know her personally in those days, but I was well familiar with her writing. I told her years ago I wanted to do an album of her songs; she’d probably given up on me.”

She hadn’t, but she was hardly holding her breath ” she was too busy writing. Ms. Walker began writing songs when she was around 12, and until a recent stretch of ill health, she never stopped. Each morning, she woke up before dawn, poured herself some black coffee, headed upstairs to her little studio, sat down at her pink-trimmed Royal typewriter (which graces the cover of Mr. Nelson’s CD) and set to work.

“Songwriting is all I ever did, love,” Ms. Walker said in an interview last month from her home. “I still can’t cook, to this day!”

She has been in the music game for a while. As a young woman visiting Los Angeles in 1940 with her father, Aubrey (a cotton buyer), and mother, Oree, she talked her way into what was the Crosby building on Sunset Strip in an attempt to show her suitcase of songs to Bing. When she got an on-the-spot audition with his brother, Larry Crosby, she ran to get Oree, her lifelong piano accompanist.

“Mama said: ‘Are you crazy, girl? Don’t you know I’m not goin’ anywhere with my hair not fixed? It’s up in rollers!’ And I said, ‘I don’t care what it’s in ” You c’mon with me!’ ” With Oree at the piano, she sang a song called “Lone Star Trail,” which Crosby recorded later that year. It was her first sale.

Others quickly followed, and Ms. Walker was so successful that she remained in Los Angeles with Oree when her father’s business in town was done. As a handsome blonde with singing and dancing talent (she had performed for years in Texas), she soon had her own recording contract and was a pioneer in the proto-music videos called “soundies.” She shows a husky, jazzy and rather elegant voice on her sole hit as a singer, “When My Blue Moon Turns to Gold Again” (not her composition, surprisingly). But songwriting was her calling, and she soon abandoned performing, returning to Texas in the mid-1950’s to be near family.

And there she stayed, except for regular trips to Nashville, New York and Los Angeles to sell her songs. Like a honky-tonk Marianne Moore, she lived most of her life with her mother, who died in 1991, and has led a very private life, the details of which remain sketchy, which seems to suit her fine. While most biographers note she has never married, Ms. Walker claims she did marry once. “But it was a short-lived marriage,” she said. “A very short-lived marriage.” She closes discussion on the topic with a long, hearty chuckle.

In the end, songs seem to be her preferred mode of expression. She quotes her own lyrics often during a conversation. After finding out about a death in a reporter’s family, she insists he hear Arnold’s recording of her poignant cowboy eulogy “Jim, I Wore a Tie Today,” even offering Arnold’s home phone number to request a copy.

The CD recalls “Stardust,” Mr. Nelson’s 1978 Tin Pan Alley set, also a career high point. But while the singer’s voice may be a tad less steady here, the material lies closer to his roots, the mix of Texas country, blues and jazz, of ballads and uptempo romps, a mirror of his impish, hybrid-minded character. It may in fact be the quintessential Willie Nelson album.

This disc aside — and not counting the hard-to-find “Words and Music” and a recent tribute set by the former Wills vocalist Leon Rausch — there are no proper documents of the breadth of Ms. Walker’s achievement. Fans might trawl eBay for a gray-market transcription of a seven-hour Cindy Walker radio special, broadcast in 1997 on the California freeform radio station KFJC. Or they might try assembling an MP3 playlist from tracks available on digital music services like iTunes or eMusic.

But they’ll have to play catch-up with a writer whose catalog is said to number over 500 songs and counting. And does Ms. Walker intend to return to writing when her health permits? “I sure do hope so, love,” she said. “I sure do hope so.”

Willie Nelson sings Gershwin, “Summertime”

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

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www.countryweekly.com
by:  Steve Morley

The songs of George and Ira Gershwin defined American popular culture in the 1930s, when a very young Willie Nelson was absorbing his earliest influences. The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize that Willie received in November 2015 was the impetus for his new all-Gershwin collection, but the real story here is the kindred spirit linking Willie and George Gershwin, the music-writing half of the sibling team. Both are known for blurring stylistic boundaries and, indeed,Summertime points to the sophistication that informs such genre-transcending Willie originals such as “Crazy” and “Funny How Time Slips Away.”

While he’s done nearly a dozen yesteryear-based solo albums, this one is distinguished by its smartly chosen representation of the Gershwins’ musical breadth and the handpicked, multi-stylistic band (with Mickey Raphael’s winsome yet penetrating harmonica again providing a crucial link to Willie’s larger body of work) fittingly snazzing up the affair while making the most of Willie’s no-dress-code musical fusion.

A pair of duets finds Sheryl Crow out of her element but clearly at ease on “Embraceable You” and Cyndi Lauper mostly in hers, camping it up like a Bronx flapper in a Busby Berkeley movie on the amusing if slight “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off.”At times, it all sounds a bit too perspiration-free, but the 82-year-old summons spunk where needed and shines on the album’s blues-styled departure, “It Ain’t Necessarily So.”

While Willie’s formula is now well established, subtle signs of his ongoing artistic growth crop up on a revisited take of “Someone to Watch Over Me.” Displaying a deep, moving interpretation and an easy yet elegant shuffle rhythm, it far outstrips the more straightforward version on his groundbreaking 1978Stardust album—the original vintage-song venture that industry execs swore would derail his career.

As the Gershwins themselves said it in 1936, Who’s got the last laugh now?

Paula Nelson, “Angel from Montgomery” (on ‘Lucky 13’ album)

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Billy Bob’s Saloon le 11.3.11 avec une chanson de John Prine qui figure sur le 3eme CD “Lucky 13”

songs:
Fire Below
Standing Tall
Day to Day Love
Every Now and Then
Baby You’re Mean
Angel From Montgomery
Surrender
Bein’ Alone
Overboard
Find Your Way
Easy Money
Only You
Jackson

Paula Nelson: Vocals, Landis Armstrong: Guitar/ Vocals, George Devore: Acoustic Guitar/ Vocals, Matthew Hubbard: Keyboards/ Harmonica/ Vocals, Chris Johnson: Bass, Kevin Remme: Drums/ Vocals

Paula Nelson’s ‘Lucky 13’ album is such great listening.  If you don’t have it, you should.  You can get it on amazon, cdbaby, iTunes.  Here’s the Texas Monthly’s original review of the album:

She may have a famous name and famous father but Paula Nelson’s music and voice stands tall on its own. If anyone had any doubt, her new project Lucky 13 will soothe the most hardened of music critics. Let’s face it, sometimes talent is in the genes, and Paula has obviously gotten a good amount of whom and what her father is musically. However, she is not Willie light or really even Willie-ish. She has her own style and is different. In some of the guitar parts of Lucky 13 it is obvious that Willie’s fingers are on the frets but other than that this record is pure Paula.

Paula ranges from Blues to Beatles on Lucky 13 and the result is a fun musical ride with a little yodel mixed with jazz, blues, country, and kick butt rock and roll. Paula penned ten of the thirteen tracks and two of the covers are duets with vocal and musical star George Devore. The two collaborate on John Prine’s “Angel from Montgomery” and the June Carter and John Cash made famous Billy Wheeler and Jerry Leiber written “Jackson.” In both duets Devore and Paula’s voice match up perfectly. Those two tracks alone are worth the price of the CD and more. Devore can also be heard in many of the arrangements with his silky acoustic guitar work.

The absolute greatest joy of Lucky 13 is Paula’s keyboard work. She is a player of rare talent. The Keys are an instrument not used enough in Texas music but Paula’s uses them with masterful elegance. Keyboards are almost the backbone of Lucky 13. They are what make the record so different and unique. Use of the various keys allow Paula to move effortlessly through the genres while the listener is graced with audible nuggets and treats that keep them listening for more.

In addition to the duets with Devore the most notable tracks on the CD are “Fire Below,” “Baby You’re Mean,” “Find Your Way,” “Standing Tall,” and “Day to Day Love.” In all Paula Nelson delivers her own individual treat of a record in Lucky 13. At times it is more like Delbert (McClinton) than Willie but nevertheless it is a kick butt fun record and stands all on its own with or without a famous name. A must have.

Willie Nelson, “Always on My Mind”

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

In 1982, Willie Nelson’s album, “Always on My Mind”, and recording of title song, were #1 on Billboard Country Music Charts.

Willie Nelson, “Lost Highway”

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

www.losthighwayrecords.com

Maria (shut up and kiss me)

  1. Maria (shut up and kiss me)
  2. Mendocino County Line
  3. Back to Earth
  4. The Harder They Come
  5. Over You Again
  6. You Don’t Know Me
  7. Lost Highway
  8. Beer for My Horses
  9. Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain
  10. Overtime
  11. I’m Still Not Over You
  12. Superman
  13. Bubbles in My Beer
  14. Crazy
  15. Both Sides of Goodbye
  16. Cowboys are Secretly, Frequently Fond of Each Other
  17. Ain’t Goin’ Down on Broke Back Mountain

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