Archive for the ‘Amy Nelson’ Category

Willie Nelson’s 4th of July Picnic, the finale

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

photos:  Janis Tillerson

Family and friends join Willie Nelson on stage on the 4th of July in Austin

 

Friday, July 6th, 2018

Happy birthday to the beautiful and talented Amy Nelson.

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Amy Nelson and Cathy Guthrie on tour

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018
Amy posted on facc book that the girls finally got some dates:
Jul 04
Willie’s 4th of July Picnic Presented by Budweiser
Austin, TX
Jul 07
Folk Uke & Annie Guthrie at Sam’s Town Point
Austin, TX
Jul 21
Folk Uke & Garrett T. Capps at Period Modern
San Antonio, TX
Aug 18  Saxon Pub
Austin, TX
Aug 28
McGonigel’s Mucky Duck
Houston, TX
Sep 29
Saxon Pub
Austin, TX
Oct 20
Saxon Pub
Austin, TX
Nov 03
Saxon Pub
Austin, TX
Dec 15
Saxon Pub
Austin, TX
Jan 27, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL
Jan 28, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL
Jan 29, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL
Jan 30, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL
Jan 31, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL
Feb 01, 2019
The Outlaw Country Cruise
Tampa, FL

Willie Nelson talks about Texas, Touring and Taxes (Country Weekly) (June 2000)

Wednesday, June 27th, 2018

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Country Weekly
June 13, 2000

“This is your cotton pickin’, snuff dippin’, tobacco chewin’, stump jumpin’, gravy soppin’, coffee pot dodgin’, dumplin’ eating, frog giggin’ hillbilly from Hill County, Willie Nelson. Stay tuned.”

Brown eyes crinkling with laughter, Willie is reciting his 1954 radio mantra as he unwinds on his famous Honeysuckle Rose tour bus.

”When I was a Texas deejay, that on-air intro made it hard for listeners to mix me up with anyone else,” he tacks on with a chuckle. Talk about your understatement. As Willie has rolled down life’s highway doing things his way and no one else’s, not one soul has ever mistaken his distinctive nasal-tinged Texas twang for anyone else’s. Not even the ones who, early on, loved his songwriting and hated his voice, declaring he’d never make it as singer.

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In a recording career spanning five decades and more than 100 albums, Wille made history with Red Headed Stranger, the ground-breaking Old Westconcept album his record company originally “didn’t get”—but the rest of the world did—andWanted: The Outlaws, the first country album to sell a million copies. His collection of pop standards, Stardust, was on the Billboard charts for an incredible 11 years!

Willie’s sang with just about everybody: Frank Sinatra, Luciano Pavarotti, Dolly Parton, Ray Charles, Julio Iglesias, Bob Dylan, B.B. King, George Jones, Leon Russell and Lefty Frizzell. And, as part of the Highwaymen, he recorded and toured with Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson.

Whether you know him as a singer, songwriter, actor, champion of American farmers, the fella who elevated Fourth of July picnics to an art form, or the industrious chap who recorded The IRS Tapes/Who’ll Buy My Memories album to pay off back taxes, Willie has always been as unique as a fingerprint.

So how does it feel to be a musical icon? ”I have to go look it up,” he says, deflecting the compliment with whimsey. “I forget what it means every time.”

Even though his face reflects the chiseled character usually embossed on a nickel, Willie is completely unassuming. He’s just plain ol’ Willie, still the kid from Abbott, Texas, who made it out of the cotton fields. It’s clear he’s as comfortable hanging out with cowboys as with kings. He’s certainly done it all.

Along the way, Willie’s kept grounded by creating two worlds. One is the bus adorned with the “Comanche At Sunset” mural that’s parked this steamy night outside Fort Worth’s famous mega-honky tonk Billy Bob’s Texas, where the bandana-wearing songman has just slap-dab wore out a wall-to-wall crowd with a rollicking two-hour concert. The bus lets him live out every word of “On The Road Again,” the anthem he wrote on the back of an airline barf bag.

The other carefully-crafted universe is Willie World, his ranch house, golf course, studio and replica of a 1880s western town outside Austin. He’s dubbed the replica as Luck, Texas. It’s been the backdrop for numerous films and videos. “Either you’re in Luck,” Willie drawls, “or you’re out of Luck.”

Willie feels equally comfortable in both worlds, where he and his extended family of road warriors can live and play. “I’ve been fortunate to find people who are easy to travel with and easy live with,” he explains, adding, “and who can also play great music.”

Willie’s loyalty is legendary. He has employees who’ve been with him for more than 40 years. Until a few months ago, the “newest” member of his Family Band was a 27-year veteran. When the crew’s bus recently wracked up 1 million miles on the road, it did so with the same driver for every mile.

And Trigger, the Martin guitar in which he’s worn a hole with his pick, has been his faithful sidekick for 35 years. When his home outside Nashville caught fire in 1970, Willie rushed passed firefighters to rescue a guitar case from the blaze. The case contained his beloved Trigger and a load of marijuana. “Stress medicine,” Willie clarifies.

Though the multiple-Grammy winner will perform more than 200 dates this year in every corner of the United States and Europe, he keeps coming back to the state he loves. “I can be on the bus sound asleep in the middle of the night and I know when we cross into Texas,” he confides. “I wake up with the incredibly good feeling of ’Well, we’re back.’

”And I still love Abbott. I head back as often as I can to play poker with the guys there. ”Then when the bus pulls onto the road leading up to my Austin ranch, a peace floods over me. My house there, like the ones I have in Hawaii and Abbott, are my ’hospital zones.’ That’s where I go to heal and get ready for life’s next battle.”

As Willie pours another cup of coffee, the conversation shifts to country music’s current battle.

”It always goes through phases,” he declares. “Right now it’s going through a slow period where everyone sounds a lot alike and the music is watered down. But somebody different will come along and wake ’em up.” Is there anyone out there giving country its wake-up call?

”There are a few stepping out,” ventures Willie. “Pat Green is a tremendous Texas singer-songwriter who’s been overlooked. There are others out there being overlooked. Pretty soon you’ll start hearing about them. Then—boom!—they’ll be the traditional stars of tomorrow. They’ll be the Kris Kristoffersons and Billy Joe Shavers.”

Willie says new songs will also rise to the top, but not as many as before. This October marks 25 years since “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” soared to No. 1. “If you look at all the No. 1 songs through the years, there are some that last and others that don’t. The percentage of really good songs was better in past years.

”Don’t get me wrong,” he adds. “Songwriters today are good, but I don’t think you could come up with a group to match Hank Williams, Lefty Frizzell, Floyd Tillman, Leon Payne—those guys turned out songs that’ll last forever.” And though he doesn’t admit it, so did Willie. Besides his own hits, he penned “Crazy” for Patsy Cline, “Night Life” for Ray Price and “Hello Walls” for Faron Young.

Later this year, Willie hits another milestone. On September 16, he and his fourth wife, Annie, will celebrate their 9th anniversary. “We’re going to have one—I hope we celebrate,” he quips. “Just kiddin’, Annie,” he deadpans. He’s candid about what’s kept the marriage together.

”The fact I’m gone a lot, probably,” he offers. “We’re always glad to see each other, and that helps. I always hate to leave, and that helps. We have two great boys, Lukas, 11, and Micah, 10, we’re raising, and they keep me comin’ back home.”

Stroking his beard, he admits, “It’s a day-to-day challenge to always try to do the right thing. I’m not talking about adultery—it’s a little late in my life to worry about that. I’m talking about being there for Annie and the boys when they need me and being there when I need them.” He pulls a drawing from the front of the refrigerator and proudly holds it up. It’s the sketch of a cow. “Micah did the artwork for the cover of the new Milk Cow Blues album that comes out in August. He’s very artistic.”

Willie just crossed another milestone, his 67th birthday, on April 30.

”I feel great—everything’s working,” he declares with a boisterous laugh. “I still do yoga, runing and breathing exercises. And I’ve done tai kwon do for a long time. Now my whole family’s doing it. Annie and the boys are black belt candidates. So I have to keep up—out of self defense!”

”I’m mellower and more moderate now. I’ve learned to savor things. I haven’t quit a lot of things, but I’ve sure slowed down.”

Maybe so, but not in his music. To reach new audiences, he’s agreed to be one of the opening acts on the red-hot Dixie Chicks’ just-launched Fly tour. And he recently released a trio of CDs: Night & Day is his first instrumental album; Honky Tonk Heroes showcases himself, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson and Billy Joe Shaver; and It Could Have Been Tonight, a double-CD live album recorded during last year’s tour.

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In addition to this summer’s Milk Cow Blues, featuring Willie and such blues greats as B.B. King, there’s Willie’s tribute to Hank Williams, Memories Of Hank, coming later in the year. Along with Bob Wills and Ernest Tubb, Hank had been one of the country crooners flowing out of the Nelson family radio when Willie was a scrawny kid working the cotton fields. One day, he recalls, his fingers were aching and bloody from jabs by the razor-edged cotton bolls. His shirt was drowning in sweat as the thermometer pumped past 100 degrees.

Suddenly, a flash of light from the nearby highway caught his eyes. It was sunlight glancing off a Cadillac barreling down the asphalt. Squinting, he watched it disappear over a hill. His dreams were hitched to the Caddy’s bumper. ”Seeing those fancy cars,” he says, “I knew there had to be a better deal than picking cotton.” Willie says these words with the same certainty that even a broken clock proclaims the time correctly twice a day. “And I hoped that deal involved music.”

Hallelujah for country music, it did.

See Amy Nelson and Cathy Guthrie, Folk Uke, at the Continental Club in Austin (6/16/18)

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

www.FolkUke.com

Folk Uke at the Continental Club Gallery
Austin, Texas
Saturday, June 16, 2018

Willie nelson & Family at the Back Yard (April 28, 2013)

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

Willie Nelson with daughters Paula Nelson and Amy Nelson

Saturday, April 14th, 2018

Paula Nelson, Connie Nelson, Amy Nelson, Scooter Jennings and friends

Saturday, April 14th, 2018

Ben Dorcy: “Lovey, King of the Roadies”

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

SXSW: At Scoot Inn, a ‘backstage’ peek at life of a legendary roadie

www.music.blog.mystatesman.com
by:  Dave Thomas

There were two things happening at the eastern fringe of SXSW on Friday afternoon.

In the sun-splashed dirt courtyard of the Scoot Inn beer garden, the Brooklyn Bowl Family Reunion was in the final stretch of a three-day run — Erika Wennerstrom’s enormous voice on “Extraordinary Love” was swamping the place like a tsunami, drowning out pockets of disinterest.

But inside Scoot Inn proper — what was on this afternoon the “Roadie Lounge” — the star of the afternoon was a legend on a different level. Ben Dorcy, who maintained his title of “oldest living roadie” by working until the week he died at the age of 92 last September, was being celebrated with sneak peeks at a documentary 13 years in the making.

Every now and then Amy Nelson, daughter of Ben’s longtime employer Willie, would try to bring the two events together, speaking to the outside crowd of the virtues of “Lovey” — as Dorcy was known to those close to him. But still, a separation remained: The show and … backstage.

For an event honoring the original roadie, it was only natural.

It was fitting that the Scoot Inn would host — it is one of the few Austin bars old enough to encompass the legacy of Dorcy, who was born in 1925, two years before the first jukebox. After serving as gardener and valet to John Wayne, Dorcy would hit the road for 65 years with the giants of country music.

Inside the dark and cool interior of the historic bar, the first 15 minutes of the documentary: “Lovey: King of the Roadies” began with Dorcy aboard Willie’s bus, sharing a joint with his old boss and recounting stories of misbehavior and wild times. It is a professional and polished film of music legends sharing what is legendary to them. Among the many icons on screen, we don’t lose sight of who the star of this show is. There’s Dorcy, shuffling along on his cane, his countenance weathered to sharp angles. In portraits, his eyes are inscrutable. In snapshots with friends, they are alive with joy.

“He took care of all these stars with this star power,” Amy Nelson said. “And he had that same kind of star power. He could have been an actor, too. He was hanging around all these amazing people and he chose to serve them.”

Amy Nelson — there on Friday alongside her co-producers of the film, David Anderson and Lana Nelson — co-directed the film with her cousin Trevor Doyle Nelson. Her love for the man who was part of the Willie Nelson Family band, and by extension, her own family, was apparent in her conversation … and also in the years she has spent on the film.

All along, she pictured Dorcy at events like these and on the red carpet at the premiere. “It was hard to keep working on (the documentary) after he was gone,” she said. But Austin’s High Brew Coffee stepped in at that moment to help push the project forward.

Now Amy Nelson says the film is nearly complete and she hopes to have details like publishing and licensing complete in time for the fall film festival season.

Ben Dorcy got his start in the music business working for Hank Thompson, but also was connected to Elvis, Frank Sinatra and Johnny Cash.

Inside the Scoot Inn, Dorcy’s fellow roadies are lined up for free custom earplugs being given out this afternoon by MusiCares. Those not on barstools having their ears peered into are watching the screen as Jamey Johnson sings a cover of “Night Life.” Toward the end of the clip, Dorcy is shown in the plaza of Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood, when a fellow in a Batman costume sidles up to him. “Where are the drugs going?” he asks. Is it a real moment or a setup? Either way, Dorcy’s reaction is authentic: “Get away from me!” he snarls.

The room erupts in laughter. These pros know, the meek don’t survive 65 years on the road.

Dorcy was connected to Willie for many of those years, but he also worked with Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, Ray Price, George Jones and Waylon Jennings, among others.

In his later years, Dorcy was connected to a similar run of “Texas music” artists: Robert Earl Keen, Pat Green, Cory Morrow, Kevin Fowler, Josh Abbott, Cody Canada and, particularly, Randy Rogers and Wade Bowen.

As it turns out, it’s no accident that Dorcy stayed on the road with the younger generation — those artists and their roadies worked together to take care of the man who had no living relatives.

“All of these fellow roadies were becoming like his sons,” Amy Nelson said. “They would network and figure out where Ben was going and where he going to work and where he was going to spend the holidays and how they were going to pay his rent.”

“It was amazing to see this brotherhood and how they came together to take care of their fellow roadie.”

It was in this spirit that Joel Schoepf (former roadie who now works for John T. Floore Country Store) and John Selman (Willie Nelson stage manager) created the Live Like Lovey foundation, to help benefit other roadies who need financial assistance.

A silent auction at the Scoot Inn on Friday, featuring items ranging from Willie-signed bandanas to original Jerry Garcia art, helped raise funds for the roundation. Looming over the auction was a huge framed movie poster for the “Lovey: KIng of the Roadies” documentary.

Before he died in September, Dorcy did see a cut of the hour and 40 minute film about his life. His judgment?

“He loved it,” Amy Nelson said. “After 20 minutes, he was like ‘I like it.’ And when it was over he said, ‘I love it.’”

“Thank God.”

Willie Nelson Family honor Ben Dorcy, King of Roadies — Fundraiser at Friday, March 16 at High Brew Coffee in Austin

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

BEN

www.prnewswire.com

Nelson Family Passion Project Comes to Life With High Brew Coffee-Powered Roadie Lounge

High Brew Coffee celebrates the men and women who bring SXSW to life with a lounge, fundraiser and a glimpse at the documentary about the original roadie and longtime friend of Willie Nelson, Ben Dorcy III.


High Brew Coffee®, an Austin-based beverage company, is taking their “for those who do” mantra to the next level with the Roadie Lounge, a unique experience built exclusively for the hardworking men and women essential to making each SXSW show happen. In addition to providing a sanctuary for roadies to recharge, High Brew Coffee has been working with the Nelson family to host a special event and fundraiser, on Friday, March 16, 2018 from 1-6 p.m., celebrating the life of Ben Dorcy III, known as the first roadie and longtime family friend. In addition to giving guests a glimpse at the highly anticipated “Lovey: King of the Roadies” documentary produced about Dorcy’s life by Willie Nelson and family over the last thirteen years, the event will serve as a fundraiser for the Live Like Lovey Foundation, which was formed to support retired roadies. Dorcy passed in September 2017 before the documentary could be completed.

Ben Dorcy, aka, Lovey, worked with all the great entertainers; Hank Thompson, Ray Price, John Wayne, Waylon, Cash, and yes, even me.  But he was more than just a guy who helped set up gear. He was a friend when you needed one and even when you didn’t. Ray Price said he kept him around for spare parts, and Ray needed a lot of those. Ben could find you things you didn’t even know you had lost. He was the first roadie ever and one of the best,” said friend and musician, Willie Nelson.

The Roadie Lounge is part of the three-day Brooklyn Bowl Family Reunion being hosted at The Historic Scoot Inn March 14-16, 2018 that will feature live performances from 24 artists, both emerging and established. Willie’s daughter and fellow musician, Amy Nelson, and legendary promoter and Brooklyn Bowl founder, Peter Shapiro, will host the March 16 Relix event, which will be open to RSVP’d guests and SXSW credentials. In between musical sets performed by The Texas Gentleman featuring special guests Rayland Baxter, Christopher Porterfield (Field Report), Erika Wennerstrom (Heartless Bastards), Nicole Atkins, Billy Strings and The Accidentals, 15-minute musical vignettes from the documentary will be screened showing the colorful, enigmatic personality of Dorcy that won over so many musicians, like Texas legends Kinky Friedman, Dallas Wayne, and Billy Joe Shaver, who will all be in attendance. In addition, guests can participate in a silent auction of musician autographed memorabilia and instruments.

“We are busy having so much fun that it’s easy to overlook those working tirelessly to produce the concerts and festivals we love. As a company that was built specifically for those giving it their all, we wanted to express our gratitude for helping bring us so much joy,” says David Smith, co-founder and CEO of High Brew Coffee. “By paying tribute to Ben Dorcy, the man who started it all, we knew we would be honoring the entire community because he was a man who absolutely gave his all during the 92 years the music industry was blessed to have him.”

Building upon last year’s High Brew Coffee deliveries to crews working behind the scenes at the festival, the Roadie Lounge kicks off High Brew Coffee’s national initiative to provide touring bands with complimentary cold brew coffee, keeping them fueled while on the road. High Brew is also collaborating with the Nelson family to finalize completion of the documentary in the coming months so it can hit the film festival circuit and tour just like Dorcy loved to.

“We made the film “Lovey: King of the Roadies” to honor Ben and roadies everywhere.  Thanks to Brooklyn Bowl, High Brew Coffee, and “The Live Like Lovey” foundation for paying homage to these unsung heroes who are literally the backbone of the music industry,” added Willie Nelson.

About High Brew Coffee®

After working tirelessly for 13 years to turn his tiny tea company into a household name, David Smith, co-founder of Sweet Leaf Tea, embarked on the sailing adventure of a lifetime. Discovering the benefits of refreshing cold-brewed coffee during warm nights navigating rough waters, the idea for High Brew Coffee® was born. Founded in 2014, High Brew is an all-natural 100 percent Arabica blend ready-to-drink cold brew coffee made from Direct Trade coffee beans. Brewed with zero heat, High Brew Coffee® offers premium low-calorie cold-brews in smooth, delicious flavors such as Double Espresso, Mexican Vanilla, Salted Caramel, Dark Chocolate Mocha, Black & Bold and Creamy Cappuccino + Protein. High Brew Coffee is shelf stable to perfectly accompany an active and on-the-go lifestyle. For more information, please visit www.highbrewcoffee.com.

About “Lovey: King of the Roadies”After 13 years in the making, Lovey: King of the Roadies is wrapping up its post-production phase and preparing to be shared with the world.  Documenting the life and times of the original roadie, Ben Dorcy lll, this film is just one piece of a bigger movement of recognition and support for the folks who make it possible for the show to go on.  Joel Shoepf and John Selman, two of Dorcy’s friends and fellow roadies took it upon themselves to look after Dorcy, making sure his needs were met up to his last breath.  In that spirit, Joel and John started “Live Like Lovey”, to assist professional road crew with their medical bills.

About Brooklyn Bowl

Brooklyn Bowl, ranked the #1 busiest club in NYC and the #7 busiest club in the world in 2017 (Pollstar), is the ultimate night out, with its groundbreaking integration of premiere music, 16 lanes of bowling, a bar featuring locally crafted beers, and food by the acclaimed Blue Ribbon restaurant group. The venue — aka “rock and roll heaven” (Village Voice) — boasts a sound system and amenities that “no other local rock club can offer” (The New York Times).

SOURCE High Brew Coffee

Related Links

http://www.highbrewcoffee.com

Folk Uke at the Saxon Pub (Saturday, February 17th)

Friday, February 16th, 2018
 See the talented Folk Uke duo of Amy Nelson and Cathy Guthrie at the Saxon Pub tomorrow night in Austin.  6 pm.
www.FolkUke.com

Folk Uke with Amy Nelson and Cathie Guthrie at the Saxon January 20th

Saturday, December 30th, 2017

See Amy Nelson and Cathy Guthrie, Folk Uke, in concert in Texas

Friday, December 1st, 2017

Folk Uke, The GRAMMY AWARD watching duo, will be playing  shows in Texas:

Dec. 16  One-2-One Bar  Austin, TX
Jan. 20  Saxon Pub  Austin, TX
Feb. 17  Saxon Pub  Austin, TX
Mar. 10  Saxon Pub  Austin, TX

If you are in the gift buying mode, they have some great gifts at their website for the music lovers in your life and for your music-loving self.

www.FolkUke.com

See Folk Uke in Austin Dec. 16

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

Amy Nelson and Raelyn Nelson at Willie Nelson’s 4th of July Picnic

Friday, July 7th, 2017