Archive for the ‘Awards and Honors’ Category

Willie Nelson honored with Dale Franklin Leadership Award, Nashville (8/29/10)

Wednesday, August 29th, 2018


Photo:  Kay Williams

Willie Nelson receives award from Brenda Lee.

On August 29, 2010, Willie Nelson was honored, along with Fred Foster and Kris Kristofferson, with the Dale Franklin Award for their contributions to the music industry. Vince Gill hosted the event.    Brenda Lee presented Willie with his award, Jamey Johnson performed “Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground.” Randy Travis sang “Funny How Time Slips Away,” and Lorrie Morgan sang “Crazy.

“I want to thank all of my friends, and all the people in this town, that made it possible for me to be standing here.  Hearing all these nice things said about me – I almost gave myself a standing ovation.   I held back, though.” — Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson breaks records at Vina Robles Amphitheater

Sunday, August 19th, 2018
www.ampthemag.com
by:  Taylor Mims

Willie Nelson and Family broke the attendance record for Vina Robles Amphitheatre earlier this month. The Aug. 11 show in Paso Robles, California was a success for performers Nelson, Alison Krauss, and Union Station, as well as promoters Nederlander Concerts. To celebrate the achievement, the venue and Nederlander Concerts presented Nelson with a custom Vina Robles wine. Pictured with Nelson (L-R) are Nederlanders’ Marketing Manager Jennifer Anderson, Vina Robles Amphitheatre’s Managing Partner Hans Michel, Vina Robles Amphitheatre’s GM Paul Leatherman, Nederlander’s Senior Programming Director Mike Goldsmith, and Nederlander’s VP of Marketing Jamie Loeb.

Willie Nelson Statue Unveiled in Austin on 4/20/2012

Tuesday, August 7th, 2018

www.hollywoodreporter.com
by:  Shirley Halperin

The country music legend will now have a permanent home in the “live music capital of the world.” Downtown Austin also paid tribute to the 78-year-old outlaw by adorning the W Hotel logo with a replica of his signature braids.

Willie Nelson will have a permanent home in the Texas capital of Austin — in the form of a statue. Standing at 8 feet tall and weighing about a ton, a bronze sculpture of the country music legend was donated to the city by the nonprofit CAST, Austin’s Capital Area Statues, who commissioned the work by Philadelphia artist Clete Shields.

The dedication ceremony was held on on 2nd Street, otherwise known as Willie Nelson Boulevard, on April 20, or 4/20, which happens to be the unofficial holiday of pot smokers (read about the origin of the term here). Nelson has been an outspoken marijuana advocate for decades with several arrests to his name (the latest in Sierra Blanca, Texas in 2010) and recently released a track called “Roll Me Up,” which features fellow pot culture icon Snoop Dogg.

Although not a native of Austin, Nelson has long been affiliated with the city having recorded there extensively and performed in the area frequently. “We felt like he just embodies Austin’s self-defined status as the Live Music Capital of the World,” said Vincent Salas, a member of CAST’s board.

Indeed, even downtown Austin’s W Hotel decorated its exterior which a replica of Nelson’s signature braids (see image below). Added Salas: “He also is just one of those guys that has been able to enamor multiple generations — not just one. He’s so iconic to the music industry.”

The 78-year-old Nelson was not involved in the creative process but did attend the dedication, after which he commented: “I would like to thank the city of Austin, Texas for this great honor. Thank you for the statue. Thank you for the street and thank you for the W Hotel. 4/20 is a good day.”

Willie Nelson: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize

Saturday, August 4th, 2018

www.PBS.org

Watch an all-star tribute to singer and songwriter Willie Nelson, 2015 recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song features performances by Nelson, as well as Edie Brickell, Leon Bridges, Rosanne Cash, Ana Gabriel, Jamey Johnson, Alison Krauss, Raul Malo of The Mavericks, Neil Young, Promise of the Real, Buckwheat Zydeco and past Gershwin Prize honoree Paul Simon.

This day in Willie Nelson History, “One for the Road” (with Leon Russell) certified Gold (August 2, 1979)

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

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On August 2, 1979, “One For The Road,” a duet album featuring Willie Nelson & Leon Russell, goes gold.

Willie Nelson Day in Texas, July 4, 1975

Thursday, July 19th, 2018

S. R. No. 687

SENATE RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, The Senate is today honored with a visit from a great Texan whose music is loved by millions of Americans; and

WHEREAS,Mr. Willie Nelson was born at Abbott, Texas, in 1933, was brought up in Abbott by his grandparents, and after high school he enlisted in the Air Force; and

WHEREAS, His career as a musical performer began when, at the age of 10, he played the rhythm guitar in a Bohemian polka band in the town of West, Texas; and

WHEREAS, During most of the 1950’s, Willie supported his family by selling vacuum cleaners, encyclopedias, and Bibles, by making saddles, or by working as a radio disc jockey, an then would spend his evenings writing and performing his songs; and

WHEREAS, He was the promoter for many North Central Texas appearances of the late, great Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys in the middle 1950’s; and

WHEREAS, In 1960, Willie and his family moved to Nashville, Tennessee, then considered to be the headquarters for American country and western music, and the next year, Mr. Faron Young’s recording of Willie’s “Hello Walls” was the No. 1 song in the nation for 12 consecutive weeks; and

WHEREAS, Since then, Willie has recorded 25 record albums and has written hundreds of songs, including such American standards as “Funny How Time Slips Away,” “Crazy,” “The Nightlife,” “Pretty Paper,” “The Party’s Over,” “Good Hearted Woman,” and “Pretend I Never Happened; and

WHEREAS, In 1970, he returned to his native Texas and since then has lived in or around Austin; and

WHEREAS, He was elected and inducted into the prestigious Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1973; and

WHEREAS, Since his return to Texas five years ago, Willie Nelson has become a folk hero to a whole new generation of music lovers, and as a result of the inspiration and encouragement he has provided to numerous young musicians, Austin is now nationally recognized for its music,  and the music industry has become a major part of Austin’s culture and economy; and

WHEREAS, This year, “Willie Nelson’s Third Annual 4th of July Picnic,” a day-long outdoor music concert, will be held on Liberty Hill, Texas; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the Senate of the 64th Legislature of the State of Texas hereby extend to Willie Nelson it’s appreciation for the enjoyment he and his music have brought to all Texans in the past, and it’s congratulations for his professional success and for the deserved high esteem in which he is held by millions of Americans; and, be it further

RESOLVED, That the date of July 4, 1975, in conjunction with “Willie Nelson’s Third Annual 4th of July Picnic,” be declared Willie Nelson Day in Texas in honor of this great Texan, and that a copy of this REsolution be prepared for this distinguished musician as a token of esteem from the Senate of Texas.

Clower, Doggett, McKnight, Adams, Aikin, Andujar, Braecklein, Brooks, CLower,  Creighton, Doggett, Farabee, Gammmage, Hance, Harrington, Harris, Jones, Kothmann, Lombardino, Longoria, Mauzy, McKinnon, McKnight, Meier, Mengden, Moore, Ogg, Patman, Santiesteban, Schwartz, Sherman, Snelson, Traeger, Williams

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Red Headed Stranger” inducted to Library of Congress National Recording Registry (6/23/2010)

Saturday, June 23rd, 2018


www.Billboard.com
by Ann Donahue

Recordings by Tupac Shakur, Willie Nelson, R.E.M. and the 1959 original cast album of “Gypsy” are among the 25 eclectic inductees announced today (June 23) to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry.

Under the terms of 2000’s National Recording Preservation Act, the criteria for preservation by the Library of Congress are that the work be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and be at least 10 years old. Nominations were gathered from online submissions from the public and from members of the National Recording Preservation Board.

In its citation for Shakur’s “Dear Mama,” the NRPB calls the song a “moving and eloquent homage to both his own mother and all mothers struggling to maintain a family in the face of addiction, poverty and societal indifference.” Nelson’s album “Red Headed Stranger” is cited for its “uncommon elegance,” while R.E.M.’s “Radio Free Europe” is lauded for setting “the pattern for later indie rock releases by breaking through on college radio in the face of mainstream radio’s general indifference.”

According to Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Va. will preserve and maintain these recordings and henceforward make them available to the American public. There are now 300 recordings in the National Recording Registry.

Inductees for the 2009 National Recording Registry are:

1. Fon der Choope (From the Wedding) – Abe Elenkrig’s Yidishe Orchestra (April 4, 1913)
2. “Canal Street Blues,” King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band (April 5, 1923)
3. “Tristan und Isolde,” Metropolitan Opera, featuring Kirsten Flagstad and Lauritz Melchior, NBC Broadcast (March 9, 1935)
4. “When You Wish Upon a Star,” Cliff Edwards (recorded 1938; released 1940)
5. “America’s Town Meeting of the Air: Should Our Ships Convoy Materials to England?” (May 8, 1941)
6. The Library of Congress Marine Corps Combat Field Recording Collection, Second Battle of Guam (July 20 – August 11, 1944)
7. “Evangeline Special” and “Love Bridge Waltz,” Iry LeJeune (1948)
8. “The Little Engine That Could,” narrated by Paul Wing (1949)
9. Leon Metcalf Collection of recordings of the First People of Western Washington State (1950-1954)
10. “Tutti Frutti,” Little Richard (1955)
11. “Smokestack Lightning,” Howlin’ Wolf (1956)
12. “Gypsy,” original cast recording (1959)
13. The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, Bill Evans Trio (June 25, 1961)
14. “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two),” Max Mathews (1961)
15. “I Started Out As a Child,” Bill Cosby (1964)
16. “Azucar Pa Ti,” Eddie Palmieri (1965)
17. “Today!,” “Mississippi” John Hurt (1966)
18. “Silver Apples of the Moon,” Morton Subotnick (1967)
19. “Soul Folk in Action,” The Staple Singers (1968)
20. “The Band,” The Band (1969)
21. “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” Loretta Lynn (1970)
22. “Red Headed Stranger,” Willie Nelson (1975)
23. “Horses,” Patti Smith (1975)
24. “Radio Free Europe,” R.E.M. (1981)
25. “Dear Mama,” Tupac Shakur (1995)

This Day in Willie Nelson History: “Georgia on My Mind” #1 Country Chart (June 10, 1978)

Sunday, June 10th, 2018

On June 10, 1978 Willie Nelson’s remording of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Georgia On My Mind” tops the Billboard country chart.

Top Ten Country Music Protest Songs: Willie Nelson, “Promiseland” #1

Monday, June 4th, 2018

www.TasteofCountry.com

READ ARTICLE HERE

No. 10: Brad Paisley

No. 9: Steve Earle

No. 8: Dolly Parton

No. 7: Dixie Chicks

No. 6: Garth Brooks

No. 5: Kacey Musgraves

No. 4: Mary Chapin Carpenter

No. 3: Alan Jackson

No. 2: Loretta Lynn

No. 1: Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson and Kurt Nilsen, “Lost Highway”

Saturday, June 2nd, 2018

At Langesund, Norway. June 2010.

Willie Nelson presented with award, in honor of Kur;s as Kurt’s album, which featured a duet with Willie had sold 90,000 copies in Norway.

Willie Nelson receives fifth level black belt, in Austin (May 28, 2014)

Monday, May 28th, 2018

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Willie Nelson featured in new Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s new exhibit, “Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ‘70s”

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

www.Tennesseean.com
by:  Juli Thanki

“Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s”
Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
(222 5th Ave. S)
Nashville

May 25, 2018 – Feb. 14, 2021. 

General admission tickets ($25.95 for adults, $23.95 for seniors and students, $22.95 for military personnel and $15.95 for youths 6-12 years old) can be purchased online at the museum box office or online at countrymusichalloffame.org. Admission is free for children five years old and younger and museum members.

Information about upcoming exhibit-related programs can be found on the museum website

On May 25, the museum will celebrate its newest exhibition with a sold-out concert in the museum’s CMA Theater. The super-sized lineup, led by musical directors Shooter Jennings and Dave Cobb, features Joe Ely, Jessi Colter, Bobby Bare, Billy Joe Shaver, Kimmie Rhodes and Delbert McClinton, Michael Martin Murphey, Gary P. Nunn, Tanya Tucker and Bobby Earl Smith, several of whom have artifacts in the exhibit. They’ll be joined by Jason Isbell, Jack Ingram, Ashley Monroe, Jamey Johnson, Amanda Shires, Jason Boland and Colter Wall, a new generation of musical renegades who, decades from now, might be featured in a museum display of their own.

One of the most vibrant and creative eras in country music history began with a fire at a pig farm.

In December 1970, the 400-acre spread in Ridgetop, Tenn., belonged to Willie Nelson, a singer and songwriter who had found more success as the latter than the former during the years he spent rattling around Nashville. After the blaze destroyed his house, Nelson returned to his native Texas.

The fire and Nelson’s relocation serve as the beginning of the story told in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s new exhibit, “Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ‘70s,” which opens Friday, May 25, and is scheduled to run until February 2021. The exhibit focuses on “Nashville and Austin, the blossoming of those music scenes, what was happening in each city and the interaction between them,” said exhibit co-curator Michael Gray.

Austin had a thriving creative scene, with artists and musicians making their mark all over town. There, Nelson grew his hair long, traded his turtlenecks for T-shirts and found a community of like-minded musicians. At venues like Armadillo World Headquarters and the Broken Spoke, audiences comprised equally of hippies and cowboys grooved to the progressive country sounds of Nelson, the Sir Douglas Quintet and Jerry Jeff Walker, to name just a few.

“In Nashville, there was a system for a lot of sessions where people like Nelson and Waylon Jennings would go into the studio with company producers and it was almost like they had to take a passenger seat in their own car,” said Peter Cooper, who co-curated the exhibit. “They weren’t able to make creative decisions about what musicians would and would not play on the records, or how the records would sound. They chafed at that.” When artists like Jennings, Nelson, Bobby Bare and Kris Kristofferson fought to gain creative control, Cooper added, it “opened up Nashville’s recording system in a really interesting way.”

While some previous depictions of Austin and Nashville have pitted the two music-heavy towns against one another, museum CEO Kyle Young describes the interaction as a “cultural exchange.”

“Tom T. Hall was coming down to Willie’s Fourth of July Picnic and taking his shirt off and saying how it was country music’s Woodstock. Waylon and Willie were in Nashville studios a lot, as were Michael Murphey and Kinky Friedman,” said Cooper. “It’s a little bit like what was happening at the Armadillo, where people that think they may not be on the same side of things wind up finding out they were playing for the same team.”

“Outlaws and Armadillos” features more film than any of the museum’s previous exhibit thanks to co-curator Eric Geadelmann, an Austin-based filmmaker who has spent the last several years working on a documentary about the outlaw movement. “Based on the narrative we’re telling, we ordered up eight short films (from Geadelmann), six to eight minutes each … These shorts are going to be a centerpiece of the exhibition,” said museum Young. The films include exclusive performance footage and interviews, some of which were conducted with artists, such as Guy Clark, who’ve since died.

That’s not the only thing that may surprise visitors.

Yes, there’s the usual museum fare: stage wear, awards and instruments galore. But there’s also the blade that inspired Clark’s masterpiece “The Randall Knife,” a set of Ringling Bros. coveralls worn by Joe Ely when he left music to join the circus, and a copper moonshine still — parts of it covered in the same green oxidization that blankets the Statue of Liberty — that was used by singer-songwriter Tom T. Hall and the Rev. Will D. Campbell, a self-described “bootleg preacher” and important figure of the Civil Rights Movement who also served as pastor to several country artists.

“Will Campbell was part of our family for years,” Hall told The Tennessean after Campbell’s death in 2013. “He married those who were in love, tried to reconcile those with hate, buried our dead and tolerated the rest of us.”

The exhibit isn’t limited to those who stood behind the microphone, either. Several gig posters designed by Texas artists like Jim Franklin and Micael Priest are featured. One glass case includes a windbreaker that belonged to Darrell Royal, the former University of Texas Longhorns football coach who’s credited with developing the wishbone offense and introducing Willie Nelson to harmonica player Mickey Raphael. Raphael has now been an integral part of Nelson’s Family band for over 40 years, and has a diamond-encrusted ring, which is also adorned with Nelson’s tiny, gold face, to prove it. (That ring? It’s in the exhibit, too.)

By the second half of the 1970s, the outlaw movement had captured the attention of the mainstream. However, “By the time ‘Wanted! The Outlaws’ (a compilation record featuring Jennings, Nelson, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser) comes out in ’76 and is the first certified platinum country record, our story’s almost over,” said Gray. “We’re talking about everything that leads up to the moment when (‘outlaw’) becomes a big marketing term.”

“Outlaws and Armadillos” begins with a pig farm fire, and concludes with artwork. Artist and songwriter Susanna Clark’s rendering of the Pleiades constellation will be on display. The painting was used on the front cover of “Stardust,” Nelson’s sophisticated and sentimental album of pop standards. The 1978 release of “Stardust,” along with two other events that year — Jennings’ arrest at a Nashville recording studio for possession of cocaine (charges were later dropped) and subsequent single, “Don’t You Think This Outlaw Bit’s Done Got Out of Hand” — marks the end of the exhibit.

Read rest of article here, see more pics and videos

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

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This day in Willie Nelson history: Willie Nelson receives Honorary Doctor of Music Degree from Berklee College of Music (5/11/13)

Friday, May 11th, 2018

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www.Boston.com
www.gma.yahoo.com

by: Johanna Kaiser

Some of the most respected names in music celebrated the next generation of singers, songwriters, performers, and producers Saturday at Berklee College of Music’s commencement ceremony.

Award-winning musicians Carole King, Willie Nelson, and Annie Lennox joined 6,000 students, friends and family members at Berklee’s commencement ceremony at Agganis Arena Saturday morning to receive honorary doctorates of music.

During her commencement address, Lennox, best known as a member of the duo Eurythmics and for her solo music career, looked back on her journey to becoming a famous singer-songwriter.

“I didn’t even know that such a thing was possible,” she said, recalling her parents paying for music lessons even when it was hard to make ends meet, her first instruments, and some of her first performances.

Lennox, who has won four Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, an Academy Award, the American Music Awards Lifetime Achievement, Billboard’s Century Award, said she hoped her story would inspire the graduates and show them the “value of unorthodoxy.”

From The Beatles to The Rolling Stones, from Marvin Gaye to Aretha Franklin, Lennox recalled the musicians of the 1960s and 1970s that inspired her and to the delight of the more than 1,050 graduating students she even belted out lines from songs some of their songs—including on by fellow honoree King.

“I realized that I had to unlearn just about everything I had been taught about music and embrace the spectacular notion that I actually was a singer-songwriter and I was going to my own thing in my own way,” she said

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Lennox, King, and Nelson for the joined students for a concert Friday night where students paid tribute the musicians and performed with Nelson and longtime collaborator Kris Kristofferson.

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“The history of music has been good, but the future is even better thanks to you folks,” Nelson told the more than 1,050 graduating students—the largest graduating class in school history–after receiving his honorary degree.

Berklee president Roger H. Brown congratulated the students on their achievements, but urged them to use their success to benefit others.

“Not only did they excel in music, but they used their music to do something good in the world,” Brown said. “I hope you students will take note of that.”

King has worked with environmental groups to support forest wilderness preservation, and Nelson co-founded Farm Aid to assist American family farmers. Lennox is an ambassador for UNAIDS, Oxfam, Amnesty International, and the British Red Cross, and has worked to prevent gender-based violence and the spread of HIV around the world.

“So let us go and work and expand that spirit of creative and harmonious community far behind the confines of our small campus,” Brown said.

Lennox, who dropped out of the Royal Academy of Music in London and worked as a waitress before forming the Eurythmics with David Stewart, reminded the graduating students, who ranged in age 19 to 57, that they could go anywhere from here.

“Wherever you think you’re heading right now, you might turn out to take a completely different route down a completely different path,” she said. “And what looks like the end might actually be the start of a brand new beginning.”

www.wcvb

www.countryweekly.com
by:  Sarah Rodman

His songs have no doubt healed many hearts over the course of his legendary career, but now it’s official: Willie Nelson is a doctor.

On Saturday, the Berklee College of Music in Boston awarded Willie an honorary doctor of music degree. He briefly addressed the graduates, telling them, “The history of music has been good, but the future is even better thanks to you folks.”

Willie got to know some of the students Friday night (May 10) when he took part in the annual commencement concert, jamming with them on his tune “Night Life” and Hank Williams’ “Jambalaya (On the Bayou),” for which he was joined by good friend Kris Kristofferson. Kris also surprised Willie on Saturday when he donned a cap and gown to help bestow the doctorate honors onstage.

In a chat on his bus before the show, Willie said he was humbled to receive the honors and tickled that the students were so well-versed in his music. “I’m naturally shocked and surprised that this whole thing is happening to begin with, and to have a bunch of young musicians that are very knowledgeable of your music and are playing it, that’s very good.”

When asked what advice he might have for the aspiring musicians, Willie said he only ever gave one piece of advice: “Don’t take my advice, do what you want to do. If it’s something that you believe in, don’t take no for an answer.”

It’s a philosophy that has served him well.

Willie Nelson statue on Willie Nelson Blvd, in Austin

Thursday, May 10th, 2018

On April 20, 2012, the city of Austin, Texas honored Willie Nelson with unveiling of statue.

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