Archive for the ‘This Day in Willie Nelson History’ Category

Willie Nelson at the Fillmore (February 21, 22 2001)

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

Willie Nelson in Japan (February 1984)

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

japan

Feb. 21, 1984

American country western singer Willie Nelson, surrounded by a troop of photographers, speaks to the press in Tokyo, as he kicked off his five-city tour in Japan.  He said he intends to offer “both standard and original jazz” to the Japanese audience.

Willie Nelson on ‘Kings of Country’ on HDNet on Sunday, February 19, 2012

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

hd

Mardi Gras in the SuperDome, featuring Willie Nelson, Jimmy Buffett (February 18, 1980)

Monday, February 18th, 2019

 

popeye

This day in Willie Nelson history: Willie Nelson performs for soldiers @Brooke Army Medical Center (2/17/06)

Sunday, February 17th, 2019

Staff and patients gather on three levels to watch Willie Nelson and his band perform Feb. 17 at Brooke Army Medical Center.  — Photo by Brian Guerra

www.ourmilitary.mil
by Nelia Schrum and Andricka Hammonds

When the 2006 San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo pulled up stakes Feb. 19, it left the wounded warriors recovering at Brooke Army Medical Center here and hospital staff with fond memories of Texas and cowboy hospitality.

Texas legend Willie Nelson and his family band treated the hospital to a concert in the Medical Mall Feb. 17, playing to a packed audience of staff and patients. Opening with his hit, “Whiskey River,” he sang signature ballads like “On the Road Again,” “Crazy” and “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys.”

Nelson played for 90 minutes. Following his performance, he signed autographs and posed for pictures with patients and staff for another hour.

The Willie Nelson band played at BAMC in February 2005 performing 11 numbers. But Nelson had to cut his performance for the 2005 Stock Show and Rodeo because he was suffering from laryngitis.

“I wanted to come back again and play for the soldiers because I didn’t feel I had performed at my best last year,” Nelson said, adding his throat since has recovered.

Willie Nelson & Family in Dallas, at the Bomb Factory (February 16, 2019) (SOLD OUT)

Saturday, February 16th, 2019

www.thebombfactory.com

The new and improved Bomb Factory is capable of accommodating up to 4,300 fans, with its mezzanine, casual suites & VIP options. The Bomb Factory can be sized to four different capacities and multi-seated options to accommodate shows as intimate as 1,000 people.
In the early 1900’s, the building manufactured automobiles for Ford. Later, The Bomb Factory was commissioned during WWII to produce bombs and ammunition for the armed forces, hence the name “Bomb Factory”. In the mid-90’s, The Bomb Factory was transformed into a venue for a few years,  hosting bands such as PHISH, Radiohead, Dave Matthews Band, Sonic Youth, The Ramones, INXS, Nine Inch Nails, and Fugazi at its peak. Utilizing only the existing foundation and walls, the complete multi-million dollar redesign will make The Bomb Factory the premier Live Music Venue of Dallas, Texas.

This day in Willie Nelson history: Willie Nelson receives two Grammy Awards at 21st Annual Grammy Awards (February 15, 1979)

Friday, February 15th, 2019

grammys

On February 15, 1979, Willie Nelson was awarded a Grammy for Best Country Vocal performance, Male, for “Georgia On My Mind”; and Best Country Vocal Duo or Group, with Waylon Jennings, for “Mammas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys

The Willie Nelson,Live at Beau Rivage (February 10, 2012)

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

img283

One of America’s most revered country music icon, widely considered a defining influence to country musicians playing over the past five decades, brings his incomparable voice and music to the stage at Beau Rivage on February 10, 2012.

At 78, country music legend Willie Nelson has recorded 67 albums, appeared in more than 30 films and TV shows and has written several books, both fiction and non-fiction. He has been inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame and received Kennedy Center Honors, along with fame and critical success as an outlaw country man in ’70s and, later as part of the formidable Highwaymen in the ’80s.

At the age of 7, he had written his first song, and it wouldn’t be long before his success in music would lead him to sign with RCA Victor records. By the time he joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1965, Nelson had already written Crazy, the song Patsy Cline would turn into the biggest jukebox hit of all time.

But despite tese distinctions, Nelson’s most important critical acclaim was yet to come. When he turned to outlaw country in the early 1970s, Nelson released Shotgun Willie; Phases and Stages and Red Headed Stranger, the wildly successful album that featured Nelson’s first No. 1 hit as a singer, a cover of the 1945 song Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.

Nelson has performed with the greatest names in music and written and performed some of the era’s best-known songs. On the Road Again, Always on My Mind, Crazy. He’s performed with Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Jessi Colter, Tompass Glaser, Merle Haggard, Neil Young, Ray Charles. And so many more.

But even for the man who se the standard for daring new moves in music and who built a career on creating classics, time would bring more inventions to Nelson’s storied life.

Nelson, whose activist politics are as recognizable as his red, white and blue guitar strap and his distinct voice, has also worked to influence the economic viability of family farms and environmental sustainability. Besides the Country Music Hall of Fame, he has been inducted into the National Agricultural Hall of Fame for his work with Farm Aid and other fund-raisers to benefit family farmers.

He also helped start Willie Nelson Biodiesel, which manufacturers a biodiesel fuel (called BioWillie) made from soybean and other vegetable oils. The fuel is made for modern diesel engines in an effort to reduce the need for imported fuel and to use a product grown by U.S. farmers.

Nelson is celebrating the release of his new CD, Remember Me, Vol. I, a compilation of country’s most influential songs from over the pasat 70 years.
img286img284

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Highwaymen” goes gold (February 10, 1986)

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

On February 10, 1986, “The HighwayMan” album, is certified gold for Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson

1. Highwayman
2. The Last Cowboy Song
3. Jim, I Wore A Tie Today
4. Big River
5. Committed To Parkview
6. Desperados Waiting For A Train
7. Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos)
8. Welfare Line
9. Against The Wind
10. The Twentieth Century Is Almost Over

Willie Nelson settles with the IRS (February 2, 1993)

Saturday, February 2nd, 2019

On Feb. 2, 1993, Willie Nelson reached an agreement on how to settle his outstanding debt with the IRS. The deal involved both cunning negotiations and clever repayment methods, and was a long time in the making.

Nelson had originally been slapped with an eye-popping $32 million back taxes bill in 1990. The legend managed to get that amount reduced to $16.7 million, a number Rolling Stone notes included $10.2 million in interest and penalties.

Unfortunately, that bit of good news was only a reprieve. Because Nelson was unable to pay up, the government placed liens on his property and then, in November of 1990, seized his assets — including gold records, a piano and his Texas ranch. (His beloved guitar, Trigger, was saved after Nelson’s daughter smartly sent it to Hawaii before the property seizures.)

Although his studio was also locked up, Nelson had a plan on how to generate money: a new album. Enter 1991’s The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories, a stripped-down acoustic record.

“It’s no overproduced album with millions of dollars of studio costs,” Nelson told the New York Times that same year. “But I think it’s the best stuff I got. I’ve always wanted to put out an album with me and my guitar doing my original songs. And my fans like it because it sounds like it’s just me in my living room singing.”

In an interesting twist, Nelson sold The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories via a heartstrings-tugging TV commercial. Fans could purchase the 24-song effort for just $19.95 (plus $4 shipping and handling). Readers can watch that ad above.

“Willie Nelson: He’s been there for those who’ve needed him,” says a voiceover in the spot. “And he’s helped thousands of people across this land. Now, Willie needs your help — and he’s reaching out the best way he can: through his music.”

Of the $6 Nelson received from the sale of each album, half went to the IRS, and $1 went into a fund to pay for a lawsuit Nelson filed against his ex-accountants — the people who allegedly got him in this financial mess in the first place, because they put his money in shady tax shelters. (According to the New York Times, that firm, Price Waterhouse, issued a statement that read, “Mr. Nelson and his advisers made all of the decisions regarding tax shelters in which Mr. Nelson invested. Those decisions and the economic consequences that resulted from those decisions were Mr. Nelson’s responsibility and not that of Price Waterhouse.”)

“We try to work with taxpayers, not just Mr. Nelson,” IRS spokeswoman Valerie Thornton told the New York Times about the intriguing deal with Nelson. “And if we have to come up with some creative payment plan, that’s what we’re going to do, because it’s in everyone’s best interest.”

Sales of The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories helped chip away at the amount Nelson owed, and his debt also decreased after the IRS auctioned off his assets and property. In another fortuitous move, the Washington Post reported in 1993 that “Nelson’s friends organized and bought up much of the booty with low-ball bids, and held it for him so he’ll eventually get it back.” That included his Texas ranch, which a fan bought as a way of thanking him for Farm Aid.

Finally, after years of this wrangling, Nelson and the government reached a payment agreement in 1993. He would pay $2.4 million, spread out over three years, and then tack on a final lump sum payment of $3 million. The Chicago Tribune reports that Nelson coughed up this last payment in 1995. The total Nelson eventually paid? A cool $9 million.

It would be understandable if this turmoil caused Nelson issues. But as he told Rolling Stone in 1995, he wasn’t affected that much by his financial headaches.

“By the time everybody else heard about it, I was already on to other things,” he said. “Mentally, it was a breeze. They didn’t bother me, they didn’t come out and confiscate anything other than that first day, and they didn’t show up at every gig and demand money. I appreciated that. And we teamed up and put out a record.”

read article here

 

Disc 1

  1. “Who’ll Buy My Memories?”
  2. “Jimmy’s Road”
  3. “It Should Be Easier Now”
  4. “Will You Remember Mine”
  5. “I Still Can’t Believe You’re Gone”
  6. “Yesterday’s Wine”
  7. “It’s Not Supposed to Be That Way”
  8. “Country Willie”
  9. “Sound in Your Mind”
  10. “Permanently Lonely”
  11. “So Much to Do”
  12. “Lonely Little Mansion”

Disc 2

  1. “Summer of Roses/December Day”
  2. “Pretend I Never Happened”
  3. “Slow Down Old World”
  4. ‘Opportunity to Cry”
  5. “I’m Falling in Love Again”
  6. “If You Could Only See”
  7. “I’d Rather You Didn’t Love Me”
  8. “What Can You Do to Me Now”
  9. “Buddy”
  10. “Remember the Good Times”
  11. “Wake Me When It’s Over”
  12. “Home Motel”

This day in Willie Nelson history: “The Big Bounce” released (January 30, 2004)

Wednesday, January 30th, 2019

for tgif 1/30/04 photo from movieweb.combigbounce

On January 30, 2004, the movie “The Big Bounce”, opened.

bounce2

Thank you, Mark, from Willie Nelson’s Museum and General Store, (www.WillieNelsonMuseum.com), for finding this gem, a still from the movie, “The Big Bounce” released in 2004, also starring Owen Wilson, Gary Sinese, Morgan Freeman, Charlie Sheen, Bebe Neuwirth, Harry Dean Stanton, Gregory Sporleder, Steve Jones, Director: George Armitage

bigbounce2

Willie Nelson’s, “Moment of Forever” (released January 29, 2008)

Tuesday, January 29th, 2019

On January 29, 2008, Willie Nelson’s album, “Moment of Forever” was released by Lost Highway Records, produced by Kenny Chesney.

 

 

This day in Willie Nelson History: “We Are the World” (January 28, 1985)

Monday, January 28th, 2019

On January 28, 1985, Willie Nelson joined 43 other artists to record “We Are The World” under the name U.S.A. For Africa.

world1

People Magazine
February 25, 1985

A sign outside Studio A bore a single admonition: “Please check your egos at the door.” Bold instructions, perhaps, since polished limousines were already nosing down La Brea Avenue toward these L.A. recording studios bearing 45 of the most luminous stars—and well-developed egos—in rock, pop and country music. Some, like Cyndi Lauper and Lionel Richie, were coming straight from the American Music Awards, an annual TV confection designed to pass out trophies and pull in Nielsens. Here at A & M’s studios, however, something far more substantial was about to take place. Before this glorious hard day’s night would end, the ego check-in counter would be the busiest spot in town.

Singers whose life-styles sometimes seem to celebrate excess were coming here to alleviate want. Their project: recording a song that could be used to raise funds for African famine relief. Their work would put a Yankee twist to a similar Band Aid project by British rockers that has raised nearly $9 million since December. But it would also make for one of the most moving nights in music history.

The progenitor of the project was singer Harry Belafonte who, impressed by the British famine effort and stunned by news accounts of the Ethiopian tragedy, had first conceived the American initiative last December.

people2

Several days before Christmas, Belafonte called pal Ken Kragen, a high-octane manager, with fund-raising ideas. “He figured, after all, the national song charts are dominated by black artists,” says Kragen. “If Jews were starving in Israel, American Jews would have raised millions.” Belafonte initially suggested staging a megastar-studded concert. Too difficult to pull off, said Kragen, recalling the money woes of the 1971 performance for Bangladesh (see page 33). “Why not a record?” asked Kragen, whose interest in world hunger had first been aroused by the late Harry Chapin, an earlier singer client. “After all, the Band Aid people didn’t copyright the idea.” Kragen then contacted Kenny Rogers and Lionel Richie, both of whom he also manages. Having taken over Chapin’s antihunger crusade in 1981 when the latter died, Rogers readily agreed to participate. So did Richie, who had spent the past several days talking about just such a project with his wife, Brenda.

Kragen next tried to phone Stevie Wonder, but without success. Then, shortly before Christmas, Brenda Richie was shopping in Beverly Hills when Wonder walked into the store to buy some jewelry. She helped him select several items and asked him to return the favor by telephoning her husband about a special project. He did—and was quickly enlisted.

Lionel, meanwhile, was busy contacting Michael Jackson, whom he had been seeing socially for several weeks. Michael, too, agreed to join—provided he could help write the song that would be recorded. No problem, said Lionel happily. Needing a producer for the record, Kragen rang up Quincy Jones, who dropped his work on a new album to donate his services to the project.

At the Jackson home in Encino, Michael and Lionel set to work writing the anthemlike song We Are the World. Progress came in bits and pieces. “I’d go into the room while they were writing,” remembers Michael’s sister, LaToya, “and it would be very quiet, which is odd, since Michael’s usually cheery when he works. It was very emotional for them. Some nights they’d just talk until 2 in the morning.”

In the days between Christmas and New Year’s, Kragen expanded his search for stars. “Basically, I started at the top of the record charts and began making phone calls,” he says. Steve Perry, lead singer and creative heart of Journey, came home to a message on his telephone answering machine. Sign me up, he said. Then Bruce Springsteen, on tour, was called. “Do they really want me?” asked the Boss modestly. Assured that he was indeed wanted, Springsteen also came aboard. “That was something of a turning point,” concedes Kragen. “It gave the project a great deal more stature in the eyes of others.”

Kragen’s final lineup—all of whom performed for free—reads like a Who’s Who of gold record collectors. Among them: Tina Turner, Bette Midler, Willie Nelson, Billy Joel, Huey Lewis and Waylon Jennings. Jeffrey Osborne was approached by Richie just hours before the taping, while both were rehearsing for the American Music Awards. “Keep it silent,” cautioned Lionel. Kragen, who had first envisioned only 10 or 15 performers, eventually had trouble stopping the project’s momentum. “In the last week we went from 28 to more than 40 artists,” he says. “I had to turn down something like 50 or 60 performers who wanted to participate.”

Many of those who came did so with difficulty. Springsteen, because of his notoriously long concerts, never travels and seldom arises before 5 p.m. the day after a show. Yet the next afternoon, after finishing his American tour in Syracuse, N.Y., he boarded a plane and flew to L.A. Daryl Hall and John Oates were also in the East rehearsing for a tour that would start a week and a half after the taping. Stevie Wonder managed to get out of Philadelphia despite terrible weather. James Ingram flew in from London, and Paul Simon showed up despite having spent the entire previous night at work in a recording studio.

On the last Monday in January, as the American Music Awards were ending at the Shrine Auditorium across town, all was in readiness at A&M. Studio C had been set aside as a makeup room, Studio B stocked with fruit, cheese and juices for incoming singers. The building’s large Charlie Chaplin soundstage creaked under a $15,000 spread of roast beef, tortellini, imported cheese and other goodies for the performers’ guests—all provided gratis by Someone’s In The Kitchen catering. The onlookers and guests (each performer was allowed five) included Ali MacGraw, Jane Fonda, Dick Clark and many family members, and all watched the night’s proceedings through TV monitors and the lenses of five video cameras.

At 9 p.m. people began arriving in streams. “During the first hour it was impossible to get anything done,” says Osborne. “Everyone was congratulating each other, meeting people they hadn’t met before.” “Saying ‘hi;’ exchanging lies,” echoes Ray Charles. “It was just like Thanksgiving, all of us together.” Ruth Pointer of the Pointer Sisters came with a camera and quickly shot some snaps of Michael Jackson (“I have two kids, and they would’ve killed me if I hadn’t”). Then sister June Pointer entered the studio with Bruce Springsteen, and the pair plopped down together on the only chair then available.

Bob Dylan showed typical reserve at first, sitting off by himself. But even the legendary loner couldn’t withstand the warmth. Hours later he could be found in a corner, rehearsing his solo lines as Stevie Wonder accompanied him on the piano, singing in Dylan’s own nasal style. Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham found himself chatting with Harry Belafonte. When Buckingham mentioned how much he loved Belafonte’s Calypso classic, The Banana Boat Song, everyone nearby suddenly broke into a spontaneous chorus of day-o’s. Ray Charles asked for a drink of water, and another singer volunteered to lead him to the fountain. Stevie Wonder. And so it went. “For me, the first couple hours were highly charged,” says Kenny Loggins. “I’ve never before felt that strong a sense of community.”

Around 10 p.m. the sheet music was passed out, and several people stepped forth to address the group. Kragen talked of plans for the funds they hoped to raise. Mindful of the decade-long “Bangladesh situation, I assured the artists that if it came down to seeing that the money got to the right places, I would go over with the supplies personally.” Then Bob Geldof, leader of the Boomtown Rats and organizer of the British Band Aid singalong, offered a moving speech about his own travels in Ethiopia, telling of a “good day” in one village he had visited when only five people had died. “Geldof’s opening speech was pretty intense,” noted Loggins later. “You could hear the truth in his voice.”

After Michael Jackson shyly described the piece he and Richie had written—”a love song to inspire concern about a faraway place close to home”—the taping began. Quincy Jones sat on a stool directing his multi-million dollar chorus, Richie on a chair next to him, Michael with the others but off to one side. At one point during the long hours that followed, emotions swept up the 400 guests, who joined the singing from their soundproof stage. During a break, Brenda Richie took orders for Fat Burgers (from Springsteen, Dionne Warwick and others) and sent a chauffeur off to a nearby hamburger stand.

By 3 a.m. the choral section of the song was recorded, and only the solo sections remained. “Everybody was drained, but also hanging on to the thread of magic in the night,” says Ingram. “You could see the fatigue on people’s faces,” remembers Osborne. The group took another break and, prompted by Diana Ross, began autographing each other’s sheet music. Suddenly Wonder came into the room with two African women, representatives of the very people the performers were trying to help. The women, nervous and exhausted, spoke through trembling lips in their native Swahili, thanking the group for all they were doing. Says Ingram, “Everybody was humbled.”

Then Jones positioned the 21 soloists in a semicircle around him. Starting with Ritchie, they all sang their parts, and the singing moved round and round the semicircle until it was completed. Loggins was stationed between Springsteen and Steve Perry during the solos; Springsteen sang his part in a huge, booming voice. “I wanted to do my very best,” Loggins says, “and with Springsteen belting his line like a loud Joe Cocker, I wondered how I should do mine.” Just be yourself, Perry advised. “I think that pretty much sums up how everybody was acting,” says Loggins.

By dawn most of the performers had finished. Dylan and Springsteen, obviously drained by the marathon, remained until around 7:30. His own solo work long since completed, Perry also stuck around to witness the ending. Osborne, after trading a few ad lib vocal licks with Wonder, Richie and others, finally walked out the studio door with Michael Jackson sometime before 8. Off to one side an exhausted Diana Ross sat on the floor, tears filling her eyes. “I just don’t want this to end,” she said.

But end it did, for the moment. Kragen, predicting profits of $150 million from the undertaking, quickly went to work pulling together the fund-raising album that would follow and arranging the single’s release in mid-March. Linda Ronstadt, who had missed the taping because of flu, agreed early on to supply one of the LP’s solo tracks. Prince, recipient of three of the American Music Awards earlier in the night, had passed up the group sing and instead went to a West Hollywood nightspot; later that night his bodyguards were involved in a scuffle with photographers and were arrested by police. Finally, at 6 a.m., the diminutive rocker phoned Jones, offering to lay down a guitar track for the group’s single. Jones declined that contribution but agreed to accept a solo cut for the LP instead. Another track would be taped two weeks later in Toronto, where a group of Canadian artists—including Bryan Adams, Joni Mitchell and Neil Young—gathered to create their own Band Aid-style recording for famine relief.

For the Americans who did take part in the all-night recording session, the rewards were greater than any royalties they might have sacrificed. They had come hoping to help a cause, and in the process discovered their own community. Afterward, most of the musicians quickly resumed the projects they had so suddenly interrupted. Tina Turner flew to New York the next day to start rehearsing for her Saturday Night Live performance later that week. Hall and Oates returned East to prepare for their own four-month road trip and Dionne Warwick jetted to Las Vegas where she performed that night at the Golden Nugget. For some, the sense of purpose felt at the all-night session wouldn’t fade with the dawn. Harry Belafonte, self-effacing initiator of the project, boarded a plane the following day for Washington, D.C. There, one day later, he was arrested while picketing outside the South African embassy.

  • Contributors: Jonathan Cooper, Lisa Russell, Mary Shaughnessy.

Willie Nelson appears on ‘Tony Bennett Duets II’ on PBS Special (January 27, 2012)

Sunday, January 27th, 2019

www.antimusic.com

Tony Bennett: Duets II, a presentation of Thirteen’s Great Performances, features the singer’s greatest hits, performed by Bennett and today’s biggest stars, including John Mayer, Michael Buble, k.d. lang, Sheryl Crow, Willie Nelson, Queen Latifah, Norah Jones, Josh Groban, Faith Hill, Alejandro Sanz, Carrie Underwood and more.

The sessions, filmed to capture the magic of these performers singing with the master of the Great American Songbook, airs on Friday, January 27, 2012, at 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings).

Great Performances is a production of Thirteen for WNET, one of America’s most prolific and respected public media providers. For nearly 50 years, WNET has been producing and broadcasting national and local arts programming to the New York community.

The album took more than six months to record, with each track recorded face-to-face with his singer partners in studios around the world, from LA to Nashville to London. Among the many highlights is Amy Winehouse’s last recorded track (“Body and Soul”), which was produced in London’s famous Abbey Road Studios in March. Other tracks were recorded in New York in late July: the Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart classic, “The Lady Is a Tramp,” with Lady Gaga, and the Alan and Marilyn Bergman classic, “How Do You Keep the Music Playing,” with Aretha Franklin, and “Stranger in Paradise,” with Andrea Bocelli, recorded at the singer’s Italian home

The full song program follows:
“The Lady Is a Tramp” (Lady Gaga)
“One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)” (John Mayer)
“Body and Soul” (Amy Winehouse)
“Don’t Get Around Much Anymore” (Michael Buble)
“Blue Velvet” (k.d. lang)
“How Do You Keep the Music Playing” (Aretha Franklin)
“The Girl I Love” (Sheryl Crow)
“On the Sunny Side of the Street” (Willie Nelson)
“Who Can I Turn To (When Nobody Needs Me)” (Queen Latifah)
“Speak Low” (Norah Jones)
“This Is All I Ask” (Josh Groban)
“Watch What Happens” (Natalie Cole)
“Stranger in Paradise” (Andrea Bocelli)
“The Way You Look Tonight” (Faith Hill)
“Yesterday I Heard the Rain” (Alejandro Sanz)
“It Had to Be You” (Carrie Underwood

Read article here. 

Willie Nelson & Family at the Paradiso (Netherlands) (January 23, 2007)

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019