Archive for the ‘This Day in Willie Nelson History’ Category

This day in Willie Nelson history: honored by Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance and Amazon Watch (July 22, 2011)

Friday, July 22nd, 2022
Willie Nelson at the Bently Reserve

Photos courtesy of Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance.

Willie Nelson was honored last by the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance, and the Amazon Watch, when they presented him with the 2011 Visionary Award, as part of their Summer Fundraiser in San Francisco.  Willie performed at the event, along with Sara Wasserman, – Dan Hicks, Tommy Castro, Narada Michael Walden, Randy Emata, Jaz Sawyer, Robin Sylvester and members of The Legendary Glide Memorial Choir-, — and many others at their fundraiser.

Every year the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance honors an individual or an organization for championing the cause of the environment, and for challenging the status quo in order to bring about real change. This year the SBA honored Music Legend Willie Nelson for his continued support of environmental and social causes through his work, his music and his life.

The Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance has been dedicated to supporting sustainable, community-based biodiesel programs since 2006 and works closely with artists like Willie Nelson, Jack Johnson and Guster, educating fans and sourcing locally produced biodiesel and blends for tours, festivals and large scale fleets. The organization is also focused on creating transparency for the consumer through the development of a certification system for local, sustainable biodiesel in the United States. I encourage you to learn more about the SBA and our work by contacting me directly or visiting www.fuelresponsibly.org

Amazon Watch partners with indigenous and environmental organizations campaigning for human rights, corporate accountability and the preservation of the Amazon’s fragile and priceless ecological systems. Amazon Watch is a known leader in protecting the rainforest and advancing the rights of indigenous peoples in the Amazon Basin. To learn more about the great work of Amazon Watch check out their website at www.amazonwatch.org.

Willie Nelson at the Bently Reserve

For information about the work of the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance, information about sustainable biodiesel, how to get involved and how you can support the SBA, visit their website.



Jennifer Raiser went to the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance event in San Francisco last night, and posted this.  To read her entire post, visit her web site. 

“And while the evening stretched on with no Willie in sight, beyond the Melons organic catering, beyond the Michael Jang rocker photos and signed Bob Weir guitar in the auction, beyond the smooth introductions and transitions by “Tao of Willie” author Turk Pipkin, beyond the extended but excellent performances by the earnest Sara Wasserman, the soulful Glide Memorial Church Choir Trio, the engaging Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks, the bluesy Tommy Castro, there was a Nelson.

First biofuel spokeswoman Annie Nelson, who took the stage, Thelma-and-Louise style with Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance Director/Founder Kelly King to share her impassioned message of decentralized, local energy with to the equally impassioned audience.

And then, finally, the man she referred to as “Our little biofuel Yoda,” her husband Willie. Utterly recognizable, and shockingly intense and happy to begin playing his famously beat-up guitar named Trigger at eleven o’clock at night, he had the crowd at hello. By then, everyone was on their feet and up front, a sustainable mosh pit of planetary passion that needed a little musical respite from the intensity. Launching into crowd favorites “You Were Always on My Mind,” “Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” and “On the Road Again,” the music made whatever challenges the planet or people were facing drift into melodious, sing-along oblivion. With his shoulder-length gray braids fastened with “Sustainable Biofuel” buttons, his red-white-and-blue macramé guitar strap, and his brown suede sneakers, he looked and sounded thirty years younger than his 78 eventful years variously spent touring in his biofuel bus, advocating for the downtrodden, defending his enterprises and habits, and singing with that distinctive twang and phrasing. All of which made Willie the most welcome red-headed stranger that would ever venture into the former Federal Reserve of San Francisco.”

Read entire article at her web site. 

 


www.sustainablebiodieselalliance.com

The Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance (SBA) was founded in December 2006 by biodiesel pioneer Kelly King, activist Annie Nelson and film maker Daryl Hannah.  Since then, the SBA has grown to include family farmers and farm organizations such as Farm Aid, the Institute for Agriculture Trade and Policy (IATP), members of the 25 x 25 coalition, environmental organizations including the EPA and NREL, renewable energy experts and NGO’s and university programs across the country.

The SBA addresses issues concerning the sustainability of the U.S. biodiesel Industry through three initiatives. The primary mission of the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance is the completion of an independent sustainability certification system for U.S. Biodiesel Feedstock, Production, Distribution and end use fuel. SBA programs also focus on educating the public on the values of community-based biodiesel systems and how local, sustainable biodiesel can help the U.S. move towards energy, economic and environmental security. Third, the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance provides tools for sustainability to biodiesel consumers and the biodiesel industry through our website and membership.

By working with biodiesel consumers and the biodiesel industry, and promoting the value of sustainable community-based systems,the SBA is bringing people together to build a sustainable energy future that benefits all sectors of society.   The Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance relies on the hard work and dedication of our working Board of Directors, the SBA Staff and the expertise of the SBA Advisory Council to achieve the goals of the organization. These dedicated and driven individuals come from all areas of the industry and each contribute unique and valuable skills to the mission of the SBA.

Willie Nelson and Asleep at the Wheel (June 10, 1977)

Friday, June 10th, 2022

Willie Nelson at the Ryman Auditorium (May 15, 2003)

Sunday, May 15th, 2022

Farm Aid IV, Hoosier Dome (April 7, 1990) (Indianapolis, IN)

Thursday, April 7th, 2022
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[Thanks to Phil Weisman for this cool Heartland Newspaper, with Farm Aid IV headlines.]

Willie Nelson will be joined by over 30 performers and entertainers for Farm Aid IV at the Hoosier Dome on April 7.  Their efforts will address the needs of the American farm family.

This entry was posted on Sunday, April 7th, 2019 at 

Generations: A Concert to Benefit Aids (March 26, 1994)

Saturday, March 26th, 2022

Willie Nelson at Austin Opera House (Dec 2,3,4, 1979)

Thursday, December 2nd, 2021

Willie Nelson and Linda Ronstadt at the Super Dome (November 18, 1977)

Thursday, November 18th, 2021
ronstadt

“Where the Hell’s that Gold?” (November 13, 1988)

Saturday, November 13th, 2021

He makes his living robbing banks.
She makes hers banking on robbers.

Release date: 13 November 1988

Willie Nelson stars with Jack Elam, and Delta Burke in this move about two outlaws on the run after stealing and hiding a large amount of gold.  The two find themselves travelling through 1895 Mexico on a train full of dynamite as rebels, Apache Indians, Wells Fargo agents, and Federal troops trail them. When they are captured by the Mexican authorities, they scheme to keep their ill-gotten riches with the help of a madam and her prostitutes. Willie Nelson, Jack Elam, Delta Burke star in this rowdy western.

Willie Nelson & Family SOLD OUT (November 11, 2016)

Thursday, November 11th, 2021
judejude

Thanks, Jude Ramirez

Farm Aid (October 4, 2009)

Monday, October 4th, 2021

Willie Nelson & Family at Mill Resort and Casino (September 21st)

Tuesday, September 21st, 2021
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Willie Nelson at Chicago Theater (9/20/21)

Monday, September 20th, 2021
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Farm Aid 2017 in Burgettstown, PA (September 17, 2017)

Friday, September 17th, 2021

www.FarmAid.org

Each year, Farm Aid board members Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp and Dave Matthews host a Farm Aid concert to bring together a wide variety of artists, farmers and fans for one mission: keeping family farmers on the land. Farm Aid is an all-day festival that brings together incredible music, good food and hands-on activities to get folks in touch with the roots of our food. Since 1985, Farm Aid has raised more than $50 million to help family farmers thrive all over the country while inspiring millions of people to take part in the Good Food Movement.

The lineup:

Farm Aid features the best that music has to offer, while remaining true to its ultimate mission.

Willie Nelson & Family on Coney Island (September 13, 2016)

Monday, September 13th, 2021

Willie Nelson – the Top Balladeer (New York Times) (September 9, 1981)

Thursday, September 9th, 2021

WHY is Willie Nelson, who wears his long, graying hair in braids, dresses like a hippie and was singing honky tonk music in Texas roadhouses as long ago as the l950’s, America’s most admired pop balladeer?

Kenny Rogers sells more records with his saccharine love songs and stagey whisky-rasp, and Frank Sinatra is certainly still a force to be reckoned with, but it is Willie Nelson who has turned chestnuts like ”Georgia on My Mind,” ”Stardust” and ”Mona Lisa” into recent pop hits, and Mr. Nelson draws a more diverse audience than either Mr. Rogers or Mr. Sinatra. The last time he performed in New York, pot-smoking rock fans were sitting next to middle-aged businessmen and their wives and a few grandmothers, and all of them were hanging on to Willie Nelson’s every word.

The release this week of ”Willie Nelson’s Greatest Hits” (Columbia records) offers some clues, both in the music it includes and in what it omits. On first hearing, Mr. Nelson’s dry, reedy tenor can sound deceptively thin, but listening to his hits back to back, one soon notices a sinewy strength that’s barely hidden behind his apparently vulnerable sound and casual delivery. One also notices that most of his hit records have used a sound, a kind of musical formula, that refers to several traditions, including country music, rock, folk and middle-of-the-road pop, without really belonging to any of them. Their most characteristic sound is a softly strummed acoustic guitar, a wailing harmonica played by his band’s most prominent soloist, Mickey Raphael, and Mr. Nelson singing, straightforwardly and with just a hint of melancholy, about faded loves, rejection in love, and men who are drawn to the open road and can’t seem to help themselves, men who live like cowboys not because they want to but because that’s what they are. A Land of Cowboys

Cowboys – there’s a clue. America needs its cowboys. There’s a cowboy in the White House, a cowboy who likes living on his ranch and gives press conferences with his boots on. There were latter-day cowboys in ”Urban Cowboy,” one of the most successful films and record-album soundtracks last year. There are more and more countryand-western clubs opening, and more and more city slickers in western shirts and boots to go to them, even in Manhattan. And Willie Nelson is a cowboy.

He’s still a convincing cowboy at the age of 48. He crisscrossed Texas for years, playing in roadside honky tonks. He peddled his songs in Nashville, and some of them, most notably ”Crazy” and ”Funny (How Time Slips Away),” became country standards. But record producers in Nashville didn’t think he could sing, and when he did get a chance to record, he was saddled with string orchestras and inappropriate material. By the time he finally became a full-fledged country star, in the mid-70’s, he had been branded an ”outlaw” by Nashville’s conservative country-music establishment, and although he has long since become a pop star, with a fistful of platinum albums and singles and several film roles to his credit, he still projects that outlaw image.

This is a curious thing. What one sees is an outlaw – a cowboy gone wrong. What one hears, especially on Mr. Nelson’s recordings of ”Stardust” and other standards, is a weathe red but reassuring voicesinging the old songs as if they really matte r to him, against a simple, folksy musical backdrop. Apparently, American pop consumers won’t buy records of songs like ”Stardust” when they are performed by entertainers who project an old-fashioned, sophisticated showbusiness image, but they will buy them wh en the singer is a longhaired, pot-smoking rebel.

The counterculture of the 60’s has become the mainstream culture of the 80’s, an d Mr. Nelson is the one American popular singer who gives the impress ion of being part of both the counterculture and the mainstream at the same time. Back to Honky Tonk

Interestingly, ”Willie Nelson’s Greatest Hits,” a double album that includes two previously unreleased performances, has only one of his performances of pop evergreens on it -his hit version of ”Georgia on My Mind.” The rest of the album concentrates on hits that are clos er to country music and to country rock. There are several live performances recorded with his wonderfully idiosyncraticband, which l ayers electric guitars and back-country church-style piano over he avy bass and the two-beat cowboy drumming of Mr. Nelson’s long time sidekick, Paul English. There are tributes to Mr. Nelson’s honk y-tonk roots, including a fine reworking of Lefty Frizzell’s ” If You’ve Got the Money I’ve Got the Time” and two numbers, ”Fa ded Love” and ”Stay a Little Longer,” that were associated wi th the late Bob Wills, ”King of Western Swing” and probably the most popular Southwestern entertainer or all time. Mr. Nelson’s most celebrated duet with his fellow country ”Outlaw” Waylon Jennin gs, ”Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys,” is here, too.

So ”Willie Nelson’s Greatest Hits” is really the best of Willie Nelson, country singer, an album for his hard-core fans. Perhaps he feels that with his albums of pre-World War II pop standards and his movie appearances, he has been neglecting the people who made his reputation in the first place. At any rate, he is still a winning country stylist.

And it is somehow reassuring, at a time when most country entertainers can’t wait to get that first pop hit and start wearing tuxedos and playing Las Vegas, to find one who knows who he is and what he comes from. Maybe that’s why his fans accept the long hair and the rumpled clothes; they are outward indications that no matter how successful he becomes, the inner Willie Nelson is not about to change.