Archive for the ‘This Day in Willie Nelson History’ Category

This day in Willie Nelson History: Moment of Forever (Janury 29, 2008)

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

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On January 29, 2008, Willie Nelson’s album, “Moment of Forever” was released by  Lost Highway Records,  produced by Kenny Chesney.

 

 

 

This day in Willie Nelson history: Country Music Award (1982)

Sunday, January 25th, 2015


This day in Willie Nelson history: Faron Young records, ‘Hello Walls’ (1/7/1961)

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

On January 7, 1961, Faron Young records “Hello Walls”, written by Willie Nelson, at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio on Nashville’s Music Row.

This day in Willie Nelson History: Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow & friends honor Merle Haggard (Dec. 28 )

Sunday, December 28th, 2014

On Dec 28, 2010, Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow, Kris Kristofferson, Jamey Johnson, Kid Rock, Miranda Lambert, Vince Gill, Brad Paisley play to honor Merle Haggard in the CBS telecast of “The Kennedy Center Honors.” Video taped earlier in the month.

This day in Willie Nelson history: LeeAnn Womack and Willie Nelson make video for, “Mendocino County Line”

Friday, December 26th, 2014

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On December 26, 2001, Willie Nelson and Lee Ann Womack filmed the video to “Mendocino County Line” in downtown Austin, Texas.

 

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Janis Tillerson took the great picture of the sign. I took the blurry picture of the street.

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This day in Willie Nelson history: “On the Road Again” joins Grammy Hall of Fame

Sunday, December 7th, 2014

www.CMT.com

On December 10, 2010, the Grammy Foundation announced that Willie Nelson’s 1980 single, “On the Road Again,” is one of 30 songs joining the Grammy Hall of Fame.  Other selections  include “Lovesick Blues” (1949) by Hank Williams With His Drifting Cowboys and “Steel Guitar Rag” (1936) by Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys featuring Leon McAuliffe. Honored recordings must be at least 25 years old and be recognized for their “lasting qualitative or historical significance,” according to press materials. Recordings are reviewed annually by a committee of recording industry professionals and final approval is made by the Recording Academy Trustees. The list now totals 881 recordings.

This day in Willie Nelson history: Grand Ole’ Opry Debut (11/28/64)

Friday, November 28th, 2014

On November 28, 1964, Willie Nelson made his Grand Ole Opry debut, as a member of the Grand Ole Opry.

Grand Ole Opry

The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee. It is the oldest continuous radio program in the United States, having been broadcast on WSM since November 28, 1925. It is also televised and promotes live performances both in Nashville and on the road.

History

The Grand Ole Opry started out as the WSM Barn Dance in the new fifth floor radio station studio of the National Life & Accident Insurance Company. The featured performer on the first show was Uncle Jimmy Thompson, a fiddler who was then 77 years old. The announcer was program director George D. Hay, known on the air as “The Solemn Old Judge.” He was only 30 at the time and was not a judge, but was an enterprising pioneer who launched the Barn Dance as a spin-off of his National Barn Dance program at WLS Radio in Chicago, Illinois. Some of the bands regularly featured on the show during its early days included the Possum Hunters, the Fruit Jar Drinkers, the Crook Brothers and the Gully Jumpers. They arrived in this order. However, Judge Hay liked the Fruit Jar Drinkers and asked them to appear last on each show because he wanted to always close each segment with “red hot fiddle playing.” They were the second band accepted on the “Barn Dance.” And, when the Opry began having square dancers on the show, the Fruit Jar Drinkers always played for them.

In 1926, Uncle Dave Macon, a Tennessee banjo player who had recorded several songs and toured the vaudeville circuit, became its first real star. The name Grand Ole Opry came about in December, 1927. The Barn Dance followed NBC Radio Network’s Music Appreciation Hour, which consisted of classical music and selections from grand opera. Their final piece that night featured a musical interpretation of an onrushing railroad locomotive. In response to this Judge Hay quipped, “Friends, the program which just came to a close was devoted to the classics. Doctor Damrosch told us that there is no place in the classics for realism. However, from here on out for the next three hours, we will present nothing but realism. It will be down to earth for the ‘earthy’.” He then introduced the man he dubbed the Harmonica Wizard — DeFord Bailey who played his classic train song “The Pan American Blues”. After Bailey’s performance Hay commented, “For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the ‘Grand Ole Opry.’” The name stuck and has been used for the program since then.

As audiences to the live show increased, National Life & Accident Insurance’s radio venue became too small to accommodate the hordes of fans. They built a larger studio, but it was still not large enough. The Opry then moved into then-suburban Hillsboro Theatre (now the Belcourt), then to the Dixie Tabernacle in East Nashville and then to the War Memorial Auditorium, a downtown venue adjacent to the State Capitol. A twenty-five cent admission began to be charged, in part an effort to curb the large crowds, but to no avail. In 1943, the Opry moved to the Ryman Auditorium.

On October 2, 1954, a teenage Elvis Presley made his first (and only) performance there. Although the public reacted politely to his revolutionary brand of rockabilly music, after the show he was told by one of the organizers that he ought to return to Memphis to resume his truck-driving career, prompting him to swear never to return. Ironically, years later Garth Brooks commented in a television interview that one of the greatest thrills of playing the Opry was that he got to play on the same stage Elvis had.

The Ryman was home to the Opry until 1974, when the show moved to the 4,400-seat Grand Ole Opry House, located several miles to the east of downtown Nashville on a former farm in the Pennington Bend of the Cumberland River. An adjacent theme park, called Opryland USA, preceded the new Opry House by two years. Due to sagging attendance, the park was shuttered and demolished after the 1997 season by the Opry’s current owner, Gaylord Entertainment Company. The theme park was replaced by the Opry Mills Mall. An adjacent hotel, the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, is the largest non-gambling hotel in North America and is the site of dozens of conventions annually.

Still, the Opry continues, with hundreds of thousands of fans traveling from around the world to Nashville to see the music and comedy on the Opry in person.

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Wanted: The Outlaws” — 1st country album to go platinum

Monday, November 24th, 2014

On November 24, 1976, “Wanted: the Outlaws” became the first country album to receive the new platinum certification, signifying one million units shipped.

The album, featuring Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser and Jessie Colter was certified gold on March 30, 1976.

This day in Willie Nelson history, on Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Artists List (11/23/11)

Sunday, November 23rd, 2014

photo:  Paul Natkin, Photo Reserve, Inc.
www.RollingStone.com

Like his conversational singing, Willie Nelson’s guitar playing is deceptively laidback, playfully offbeat and instantly recognizable. Amazingly, Nelson has been playing the same Martin M-20 classical guitar, nicknamed Trigger, since 1969; it has defined his sound, a nylon-stabbing mix of country, blues and Django Reinhardt’s gypsy jazz. Though  the guitar now has a large gaping hole, Nelson still plays it nightly. “I have  come to believe we were fated for each other,” he said. “The two of us even look alike. We are both pretty battered and bruised.”

We assembled a panel of top guitarists and other experts to rank their favorites and explain what separates the legends from everyone else.  Read about The Voters.

1. Jimi Hendrix; 2. Eric Clapton; 3. Jimmy Page; 4. Keith Richards; 5. Jeff Beck; 6. B.B. King; 7. Chuck Berry; 8 Eddie Van Halen; 9. Duane Allman; 10. Pete Townsend; 11. George Harrison; 12. Stevie Ray Vaughan; 13. Albert King; 14. David Gilmore; 15. Freddie King; 16. Derek Trucks; 17. Neil Young; 18 Les Paul; 19. James Burton; 20. Carlos Santana;  21. Chet Atkins; 22. Frank Zappa; 23. Buddy Guy; 24. Angus Young; 25. Tony Iommi; 26. Brian May; 27. Bo Diddley; 28. Joey Ramone; 29. Scotty Moore; 30. Elmore James; 31. Ry Cooder; 32. Billy Gibbons; 33. Prince; 34. Curtis Mayfield; 35. John Lee Hooker; 36. Randy Rhoads; 37. Mick Taylor; 38. The Edge; 39. Steve Cropper; 40. Tom Morello;  41. Mick Ronson; 42. Michael Bloomfield; 43. Hubert Sumlin; 44. Mark Knofler; 45. Link Wray; 46. Jerry Garcia; 47. Stephen Stills; 48. Jonny Greenwood; 49. Muddy Waters, 50. Richie Blackmore; 51. Johnny Marr; 52. Clarence White; 53. Otis Rush; 54. Joe Walsh; 55. John Lennon; 56. Albert Collis; 57. Rory Gallagher; 58. Peter Green; 59. Robbie Robertson; 60. Ron Asheton; 61. Dickey Betts; 52. Robert Fripp; 63. Johnny Winter; 64. Duane Eddy; 65. Slash; 66. Leslie West; 67. T-Bone Walker; 68. John McLaughlin; 69.  Richard Thompson; 70. Jack White; 71. Robert Johnson; 72. John Frusicante; 73. Kurt Cobain; 74. Dick Dale; 75. Joni Mitchell; 76. Robbie Krieger; 77. Willie Nelson; 78. John Fahey; 79. Mike Campbell; 80. Buddy Holly; 81. Lou Reed; 82. Nels Cline; 83. Eddie Hazel; 84. Joe Perry; 85. Andy Summers; 86. J. Mascis; 87. James Hetfield; 88. Carl Perkins; 89. Bonnie Raitt; 90. Tom Verlaine; 91. Dave Davies; 92. Dimebag Darrell; 93. Paul Simon; 94. Peter Buck; 95. Roger McGuinn; 96. Bruce Springsteen; 97. Steve Jones; 98.  Alex Lifeson; 99. Thurston Moore; 100. Lindsay Buckingham.

Read about all 100 at Rolling Stone site. 
CONTRIBUTORS: David Browne, Patrick Doyle, David Fricke,  Will Hermes, Brian Hiatt, Alan Light, Rob Tannenbaum, Douglas Wolk

This day in Willie Nelson history, “Come Early Morning” Soundtrack (Nov. 10, 2006)

Monday, November 10th, 2014

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On November 10, 2006, the Ashley Judd soundtrack to the movie “Come Early Morning” was released. The soundtrack features Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Eddy Raven, Don Gibson, Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan, Jim Chesnut, Emmylou Harris and Billy Joe Shaver.

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Nov 10, 2006

Tracklisting
1. Killing the Blues – The Malcolm Holcombe Group
2. End of the Wine – Misty Morgan/Jack Blanchard
3. Going to See Cal
4. The Way I Am – Merle Haggard
5. Don’t Knock – Taylor Grocery Band
6. An Invitation and a Kiss
7. Silver Wings – Merle Haggard
8. Frog Leg Champ
9. I Got Mexico – Eddy Raven
10. Goodnight Lucy
11. Oh Lonesome Me – Don Gibson
12. Movin’ Out, Movin’ Up and Movin’ On – Troy Cook Jr./The Long Haul Band
13. Argument in the Parking Lot
14. I’m Going Nowhere – Troy Cook Jr./The Long Haul Band
15. What’s Done Is Done – Jeannie Max Lane
16. Owen Is Leaving
17. Jesus on the Main Line – Taylor Grocery Band
18. Gaining Strength
19. Get Back to Loving Me – Jim Chestnut
20. Daddy and Daughter
21. Leavin’ Ain’t the Only Way to Go – Eric James Jochmans
22. Somebody Pick Up My Pieces – Willie Nelson/Emmylou Harris
23. Lucy is Free
24. Old Chuck of Coal – Billy Joe Shaver
25. It Anybody Asks You (Callin’) – Shannon Boshears

This day in Willie Nelson history: “On the Road Again” #1 on Billboard Country Singles Chart (1980)

Saturday, November 8th, 2014

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On November 8, 1980, Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again” rose to #1 on Billboard Country Singles chart.

Willie Nelson performs “On The Road Again” live at the US Festival, 1983. “On the Road Again” became Nelson’s 9th Country & Western No. 1 hit overall in November 1980. In addition, the song reached No. 20 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming his biggest pop hit to that time. Nelson won Grammy Award for Best Country Song a year later. Buy the entire concert here at: http://www.shoutfactory.com/?q=node/1…

This day in Willie Nelson history: ‘City of New Orleans’ (#1 Billboard) (Nov. 3, 1984)

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

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On November 3, 1984, Willie Nelson’s recording of the song, ‘City Of New Orleans” is #1 on the Billboard country chart.

Here is a great video of scenes from old trains, set to Willie Nelson’s recording of the song.

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This day in Willie Nelson history: “Come Early Morning” soundtrack (10/31/06)

Friday, October 31st, 2014

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On November 10, 2006, the Ashley Judd movie “Come Early Morning” debuts in theaters. The soundtrack features Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Eddy Raven, Don Gibson, Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan, Jim Chesnut, Emmylou Harris and Billy Joe Shaver.

earlymorning
Nov 10, 2006

Tracklisting
1. Killing the Blues – The Malcolm Holcombe Group
2. End of the Wine – Misty Morgan/Jack Blanchard
3. Going to See Cal
4. The Way I Am – Merle Haggard
5. Don’t Knock – Taylor Grocery Band
6. An Invitation and a Kiss
7. Silver Wings – Merle Haggard
8. Frog Leg Champ
9. I Got Mexico – Eddy Raven
10. Goodnight Lucy
11. Oh Lonesome Me – Don Gibson
12. Movin’ Out, Movin’ Up and Movin’ On – Troy Cook Jr./The Long Haul Band
13. Argument in the Parking Lot
14. I’m Going Nowhere – Troy Cook Jr./The Long Haul Band
15. What’s Done Is Done – Jeannie Max Lane
16. Owen Is Leaving
17. Jesus on the Main Line – Taylor Grocery Band
18. Gaining Strength
19. Get Back to Loving Me – Jim Chestnut
20. Daddy and Daughter
21. Leavin’ Ain’t the Only Way to Go – Eric James Jochmans
22. Somebody Pick Up My Pieces – Willie Nelson/Emmylou Harris
23. Lucy is Free
24. Old Chuck of Coal – Billy Joe Shaver
25. It Anybody Asks You (Callin’) – Shannon Boshears

This day in Willie Nelson History: Grand Opening of Patsy Cline Theater (10/29/09)

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

On October 29, 2009, Willie Nelson and Family performed in Winchester, West Virginia, at the official grand opening of the Patsy Cline Theater. Patsy’s husband and daughter attended the festivities.

Thanks again to Christian Schweiger, co-producer of the event, for sharing with me about the show, and sending me one of the programs and post cards from the

Local singers opened the show for Willie Nelson and his band, and they got the shirts to prove it.

Photo by:  Rick Foster

“I recorded a song called “I Fall to Pieces,” and I was in a car wreck. Now I’m worried because I have a brand-new record, and it’s called “Crazy”!”-Patsy Cline

 

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Thanks to Christian Schweiger, Schweiger/Dearing Production, for sharing artwork  for the dedication of the Patsy Cline Theater in Winchester, VA in 2009.

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This day in Willie Nelson history: “Good Hearted Woman” recorded in Nashville (10/21/1971)

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Oct 21, 1971 Willie Nelson records a solo version of “Good Hearted Woman” in an afternoon session at Nashville’s RCA Studio B. A duet version of the song with Waylon Jennings becomes a standard four years later