Archive for the ‘This Day in Willie Nelson History’ Category

This day in Willie Nelson History: USO Show in Germany with Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey (May 23, 2005)

Thursday, May 23rd, 2019

In 2005 Willie Nelson joined Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey on a USO tour to entertain the troops overseas at the Ramstein Airbase in Germany. The show was filmed, and broadcast on television as “Nick and Jessica’s Tour of Duty.” Also on the tour: Big and Rich, and talk show host Jimmy Kimmel. Willie and Jessica treated the crowd to a duet from movie ‘The Dukes of Hazzard’, the movie they starred in together, ‘These Boots are Made for Walking.”

Jimmey Kimmel talked about Willie at the show, and said, “I got to meet Willie Nelson. He’s such a nice guy, he even let me carry his bags through customs for him.!”

Willie Nelson on the David Letterman Show (May 22, 1984)

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

Willie Nelson’s First New York Appearance: Max’s Kansas City (May 16 – 21, 1973)

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

People Magazine, “Inside Country Music” (May 21, 1984)

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

People Magazine
Inside Country Music
May 21, 1984
by Chet Flippo

When country’s greatest star, the late Hank Williams, went into the studio to record an album, he was treated like a serf.  Fred Rose, the autocratic producer and co-writer, had already decreed what songs would be cut and which musicians would perform on those cuts.  A true feudal system, Hank was the first  country superstar and never made much more than $100,000 a year.  He didn’t know that he could complain — though had he lived to see Kenny Rogers take in more than $20 million last year, he might have figured it out. 

The drastic change – that is to say, the commercial change — began early in 1976 with Wanted:  the Outlaws.  That was the first Nashville album to go platinum.  And it was strictly a patch job designed to pick up a few extra bucks with a handful of songs already in the can.  Jerry Bradley, then running RCA in Nashville, had a keen eye for packaging a concept.  He saw that Willie Nelson had abandoned Nashville for  Texas, and that Willie’s buddy, Waylon Jennings, was wearing not only leather and long hair but a fierce spirit of musical independence that was drawing a new, young multiclass audience. 

For the Outlaws album, Bradley put together some cuts by Willie, Waylon, Jessi Colter (Waylon’s wife) and Tompall Glaser, fronting the package with an album cover that looked like a Wild West wanted poster.  The songs were not among any of the artist’s finest work, but the album’s image was perfect.  After years of country stars singing syrup and looking like mannequins, here were some mavericks daring to get down and dirty, if need be. 

The surprise was that the music had not changed — Willie had always sung eclectic country blues and Waylon had played a hard, rock-tinged sound ever since his stint in Buddy Holly’s band — but that the audience had.  It was a weird mix of hippies and rednecks, stumbling over this “progressive country” after rejecting the soft country and soft rock that were the alternatives.  The outlaw phenomenon took off, and amazing thins happened. Urban cowboys sprang up all over the pace.  This was not such a country-to-pop crossover hit as a Certified New Thing.  Utopia reigned as rednecks grew their hair long and hippies cut there’s short, and everybody danced arm-in-arm with honky-tonks everywhere.

After years of slumber, Nashville was cashville.  Out went the violins, back were the fiddles, albeit mixed with ringing electric guitars and a solid rock beat.  Into town came the money merchants, sniffing a trend.  In 1977 former pop singer, jazz singer and folk singer Kenny Rogers tested country’s water with Lucille — and he found something he never had before:  a big career.  Country became a genuine big business.

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“Then there’s Willie Nelson, who is in his own time zone and can do whatever we wants.” — Chet Flippo

Willie Nelson named 2009 Texas State Musician (May 20, 2009)

Monday, May 20th, 2019
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The Texas Commission on the Arts has named Willie Nelson the 2009 Texas State Musician.

Congratulations, Willie!

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, The Texas Commission on the Arts has announced the 2009 and 2010 appointments for the positions of State Poet Laureate, State Musician, State Two-Dimensional Artist, and State Three-Dimensional Artist; and

WHEREAS, Honorees are chosen for the exceptional quality of their work and for their outstanding commitment to the arts in Texas; nominees must either be native Texans or have resided in the state for at least five years; in addition, they must have received critical recognition from state, regional, and national publications, and they must have attained the highest levels of excellence in their respective disciplines; and

WHEREAS, The 2009 Texas State Poet Laureate is Paul Ruffin, a Distinguished Professor of English at Sam Houston State University; the author of six acclaimed books of poetry as well as several volumes of fiction and nonfiction, Mr. Ruffin has published poems in hundreds of journals and anthologies; he is also the founder and editor of The Texas Review and the director of Texas Review Press; and

WHEREAS, Willie Nelson is the 2009 Texas State Musician; this legendary Texas performer was playing the guitar at the age of 6 and performing at 10; after establishing himself in Nashville as a hit songwriter, he returned to Texas and soon became world-famous as an interpreter of his own songs and as an icon of the outlaw country music movement; he has further distinguished himself as a film and television actor and entrepreneur, as well as an ever-popular touring concert artist who has been involved in numerous charity events such as FarmAid; and

WHEREAS, The 2009 Texas State Two-Dimensional Artist is Rene Alvarado; born in Mexico, he came to the United States with his family as a boy, and his work powerfully evokes the values and heritage of his native country, finding universal resonance in the rich particularity of Mexican culture; his work has been featured in galleries and exhibitions throughout Texas and the Southwest; and

WHEREAS, Eliseo Garcia has been selected as the 2009 Texas State Three-Dimensional Artist; his inspiring bas-relief sculptures pay homage to the importance of family, love, and spirituality while reflecting the ancient cultural traditions of the Aztec and Mayan civilizations; often carved out of Texas limestone, his works are on permanent display in arts centers, hospitals, libraries, and other public buildings across the state; and

WHEREAS, Fort Worth native and Denton resident Karla K. Morton has been named as the 2010 Texas State Poet Laureate; a songwriter and children’s book author as well as a celebrated poet, Ms. Morton performs her poetry across the state and has recorded her poems with musical accompaniment; she is a founder of the Denton Poet’s Assembly and a member of the board of directors of the Greater Denton Arts Council; and

WHEREAS, Sara Hickman of Austin will be the 2010 Texas State Musician; this talented singer-songwriter has recorded many critically acclaimed albums; the daughter of a painter and a weaver, the multitalented Ms. Hickman is also a painter; she supports many social causes through her work and regularly performs and records music for children; and

WHEREAS, Austin painter Marc Burckhardt has been named as the 2010 Texas State Two-Dimensional Artist; born in Germany and raised in Texas, Mr. Burckhardt combines European imagery with thematic material from contemporary American life; his mischievous wit is enhanced by his adoption of the glazing and varnishing techniques of the old masters, and his work has been featured in galleries and shows around the nation and across the world; and

WHEREAS, The 2010 Texas State Three-Dimensional Artist will be John Bennett, who began sculpting figures in 1976 and cast his first bronze in 1985; acclaimed for his sculptures of women, he has created works depicting women from all walks of life, from Old West legend Annie Oakley to 98-year-old Alice Reeves, a former schoolteacher and granddaughter of a slave; one of his pieces was selected by the Women’s Museum for display at the White House in 1999; and

WHEREAS, The men and women who have been selected to hold these prestigious posts for the next two years have all greatly contributed to the vibrant cultural life of the Lone Star State, and Texas is indeed fortunate to be home to these talented artists; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the 81st Legislature of the State of Texas hereby honor the 2009 and 2010 appointees to the positions of State Poet Laureate, State Musician, State Two-Dimensional Artist, and State Three-Dimensional Artist and extend to each of them sincere best wishes for continued creativity and achievement

Willie Nelson at Innsbrook Pavilion (May 20, 2012)

Monday, May 20th, 2019

This Day in Willie Nelson History: Stagecoach (May 18, 1986)

Saturday, May 18th, 2019
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On May 18, 1986, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson and Waylon Jennings appear in a CBS-TV remake of the western movie “Stagecoach,” along with June Carter, John Schneider, John Carter Cash, Jessi Colter, David Allan Coe and Billy Swan.

This movie stars Willie Nelson, and his Highwaymen buddies, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson and Waylon Jennings. Great soundtrack, lots of Trigger playing throughout. Willie sings the title song, which he wrote with David Alan Coe, who also is in the movie, along with June Carter and other faces you will recognize.

Willie Nelson plays Doc Holiday. The movie has some of the best/worst movie lines ever:

Willie: “Is that the deck you play with?” Waylon: “One of them.” Willie: “May I see it, please? I must say, I admire your guts.” Waylon: “Does that mean you wouldn’t play cards with me?” Willie: “That means I’d shoot you on sight.”

Kris: Where ya headed? Dallas: “I knew the answer to that when I was about 14. Then I hit 15 and I ran head onto that thing called reality. And I been walking with a lantern ever since.”

Waylon: “Don’t light that.” Willie: “Did you say something?” Waylon: “A gentleman doesn’t smoke in the presence of a lady” Willie: “I wouldn’t like to think that you are implying that I am anything less. I may be, you understand, but I just wouldn’t want to hear you say it.” Willie: “And what are you looking at, friend?” Man: “That’s a filthy habit, smoking, just filthy.” Willie: “I have a lot of filthy habits. Most of them I find very enjoyable” Man: “Don’t you have any good habits.” Willie: “You mean something that can be admired, and held up to a child as a good example?” Man: “Yes, something like that.” Willie: “No sir. Children despise that. There’s nothing a child despises more than a good example.”

June Carter to Willie (when he drinks a shot of whiskey): “Did you eat?” Willie: “I ate a lot when I was young.”

Willie Nelson & Family at Stubbs (May 16, 18, 2002)

Friday, May 17th, 2019

Willie nelson at the Ryman Auditorium (May 15, 2003)

Wednesday, May 15th, 2019

This day in Willie Nelson history: “To All The Girls I’ve Loved Before” with Julio Iglesius certified gold (May 14, 1984)

Tuesday, May 14th, 2019
On May 14, 1984, the single of duet by Willie Nelson and Julio Iglesius certified gold.

This day in Willie Nelson History: in concert with Leon Russell in Johnson City, Tennessee (May 12, 1979)

Sunday, May 12th, 2019

When it opened in the summer of 1974 Johnson City’s Freedom Hall rocked.

Okay, the first act didn’t rock: that was comedian Bob Hope who opened Freedom Hall on July 5, 1974. But he was certainly a big name act. And by fall 1974 the place was jumping from all the rock and rollers rumbling through: Alice Cooper, KISS, Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZ Top, Doobie Brothers, Bob Seger, Linda Ronstadt, REO Speedwagon, Charlie Daniels Band, Marshall Tucker Band. And that was just the first year!

The seventies were probably the golden age of rock and roll tours. And when Freedom Hall opened we finally got our own arena in upper east Tennessee. We no longer had to drive to Knoxville or Asheville or Charlotte to see big name acts. They came here: Elvis! The Eagles! Bruce Springsteen! The Beach Boys! Tom Jones! Engelbert Humperdinck!

You should have been here.

David Miller and I, who attended many, many of those shows, have been scouring old issues of the Times News to come up with this list of all the big name acts that played at Freedom Hall in the seventies. By our count there were 183 big time acts who played Freedom Hall in that five year period! I can’t promise it’s complete but it’s close. I have included ticket prices where we could find them.

(This post is about Freedom Hall in Johnson City, Tennessee not Freedom Hall in Louisville, Ky.)

Freedom Hall opened on July 5, 1974

July 5, 1974 – Bob Hope w/Karen Stanton and the Bowers Family – $10, $8, $6
Aug. 10, 1974 – Frankie Vali and the Four Seasons – $6, $5, $4
Sept. 28, 1974 – Earl Scruggs Review
Oct. 4, 1974 – Mac Davis – $6.50, $5.50, $4.50
Oct. 18, 1974 – J. Geils Band w/REO Speedwagon – $5
Nov. 8, 1974 – Mountain w/Atlanta Rhythm Section – $5
Nov. 26, 1974 – Black Oak Arkansas w/Foghat and The Stampeders – $6
Dec. 7, 1974 – Doobie Brothers
Jan. 4, 1975 – Bachman-Turner Overdrive w/Bob Seger
Feb. 17, 1975 – Joe Walsh w/Charlie Daniels Band – $5
March 8, 1975 – Marshall Tucker Band w/REO Speedwagon
March 11, 1975 – Guy Lombardo – $6, $5, $4
March 22, 1975 – Lynnrd Skynnrd w/Sensational Alex Harvey Band – $5
March 28, 1975 – Johnny Winter w/James Cotton Blues Band – $5
April 19, 1975 – ZZ Top w/Status Quo – $6
April 21, 1975 – Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
April 24, 1975 – KISS (3,000 attendance) w/Rush and Heavy Metal Kids
May 2, 1975 – Porter Waggoner w/Barbara Lea and Speck Rhodes – $5
May 10, 1975 – America w/Captain – $6
May 17, 1975 – Linda Ronstadt w/Al Stewart – $6
May 27, 1975 – Alice Cooper w/Suzi Quatro – $6
May 31, 1975 – John Prine
June 25, 1975 – Peter Frampton w/Montrose – $5
June 27, 1975 – Sonny Payne Trio – $4
July 4, 1975 – Merle Haggard w/Ronnie Reno and Leona Williams – $6, $5
July 15, 1975 – Electric Light Orchestra w/Slade and Pavlov’s Dog – $5
Aug. 4, 1975 – Eagles w/Poco
Aug. 21, 1975 – Jethro Tull w/Sensational Alex Harvey Band – $7
Aug. 30, 1975 – Uriah Heep w/Blue Oyster Cult
Sept. 19, 1975 – Marshall Tucker Band w/Wet Willie and Heartsfield – $5.50
Oct. 1, 1975 – Aerosmith w/Ted Nugent – $6.50
Oct. 10, 1975 – Four Seasons
Oct. 15, 1975 – Rod Stewart w/Faces
Oct. 22, 1975 – Black Oak Arkansas w/Foghat and Montrose – $5.50
Nov. 5, 1975 – Edgar Winter Group w/Rick Derringer, J. Geils Band and Climax Blues Band – $5.50
Nov. 9, 1975 – Lettermen – $6.50, $5,50
Dec. 6, 1975 – Black Sabbath w/Manfred Mann’s Earth Band and Ruby Starr & The Grey Ghost – $5.50
Dec. 27, 1975 – Charlie Daniels Band w/Atlanta Rhythm Section and Grinderswitch – $6.50
Jan. 10, 1976 – REO Speedwagon w/Bob Seger and Styx – $5.50
Jan. 29, 1976 – Vienna Boys’ Choir – $5
Jan. 31, 1975 – Deep Purple w/Ted Nugent and Nazareth – $5.50
Feb. 13, 1976 – Van Cliburn – $5
Feb. 28, 1976 – Bachman-Turner Overdrive w/REO Speedwagon and Trooper – $6.50
March 13, 1975 – Joe Cocker w/Ozark Mountain Daredevils and Point Blank – $6.50
March 18, 19 and 20, 1976 – Elvis – $12.50, $10 (sold out all 22,000 seats for the three shows)
April 2, 1976 – Neil Sedaka – $6.50
April 20, 1976 – Bruce Springsteen – $5.50
May 14, 1976 – President Gerald Ford – 9 a.m. – free
May 14, 1976 – Santana w/Ted Nugent and Star Castle – $5.50
May 31 – Yes w/Pousette Dart Band
June 22, 1976 – Nazareth w/Elvin Bishop & Ian Gillan – $5.50
July 19, 1976 – KISS w/Bob Seger Silver Bullet Band – $6
Aug. 16, 1976 – Doobie Brothers w/Heart – $6
Sept. 2, 1976 – Robin Trower w/Angel – $7
Oct. 10, 1976 – Donald Byrd & the Blackbyrds w/Dorothy Moore and Chocolate Milk – $7, $6
Oct. 13, 1975 – Aerosmith and Ted Nugent w/Rush – $5.50
Oct. 19, 1976 – Frank Zappa and the Mothers – $6
Oct. 15, 1976 – John Denver (Democratic fundraiser) – $100, $25, $10
Oct. 29, 1976 – Blue Oyster Cult w/Mothers Finest and The Ramones – $6
Nov. 9, 1976 – Seals and Croft – $6
Nov. 21, 1976 – Leon Russell w/Thunderbyrd starring Roger McGuinn – $6
Dec. 4, 1976 – Jerry Lee Lewis w/Jeanne Pruett and Ronnie Dove – $6, $5
Dec. 10, 1976 – Kansas w/Sea Level and Starcastle – $6
Jan. 15, 1977 – Charlie Daniels Band w/Elvin Bishop and Cate Bros. – $6
Jan. 29, 1977 – Marshall Tucker Band w/Pure Prairie League – $6
Feb. 12, 1977 – Waylon Jennings – $7, $6
Feb. 18, 1977 – Boston w/Atlanta Rhythm Section – $6
Feb. 19, 1977 – Elvis Presley – $15, $12.50
Feb. 26, 1977 – KISS w/Dictators – $6.50
March 11, 1977 – Willie Nelson w/Jerry Jeff Walker and Steve Young – $6.50, $5.50
March 19, 1977 – Dolly Parton w/Parker McGee – $7, $6
April 2, 1977 – Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band w/Starz – $7, $6
April 15, 1977 – ZZ Top – $7
April 22, 1977 – Jerry Reed & George Jones – $6.75, $5.75
May 4, 1977 – Tom Jones – $9, $8
May 6, 1977 – Gregg Allman – $7, $6
May 19, 1977 – Foghat w/Styx and Head East – $6
May 30, 1977 – Ted Nugent w/Nazareth and Michael Stanley Band – $6
June 18, 1977 – Dan Fogelberg w/Fools Gold – $7, $6
June 27, 1977 – Emerson, Lake & Palmer – $8
July 4, 1977 – Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons Farewell Tour – $7, $6
July 6, 1977 – REO Speedwagon w/Black Oak Arkansas and Judas Priest – $6
July 20, 1977 – Captain & Tenille w/Kip Addotta – $7.50, $6.50 – Cancelled
Aug. 19, 1977 – Bad Company w/Climax Blues Band – $6
Aug. 23, 1977 – Willie Nelson w/Emmylou Harris – $7, $6
Sept. 23, 1977 – Jimmy Buffet w/Jesse Winchester – $7, $6
Oct. 4, 1977 – Tom Jones – $9, $8
Oct. 8, 1977 – Heart w/Sanford Townsend Band – $6
Oct. 13, 1977 – Ferrante & Teicher – $7.50, $6.50
Oct. 21, 1977 – Kenny Rogers w/Stella Parton and T.G. Sheppard – $7, $6
Oct. 29, 1977 – Robin Trower w/Ram Jam and Crawler – $6
Nov. 11, 1977 – Beach Boys – $7
Nov. 12, 1977 – Tom T. Hall w/Jean Shepard and Jerry Clower – $7
Nov. 19, 1977 – England Dan and John Ford Coley – $7, $6
Nov. 24, 1977 – AC/DC w The Motors and UFO
Dec. 3, 1977 – Edgar Winter’s White Trash w/Charlie Daniel’s Band and Wet Willie
Dec. 8, 1977 – Ronnie McDowell – $5
Dec. 10, 1977 – Styx w/April Wine – $7
Jan. 27, 1978 – Bob Barker’s Fun and Games – $6
Feb. 4, 1978 – Charlie Pride w/Dave and Sugar – $7, $6, $5
Feb. 22, 1978 – Engelbert Humperdinck – $10, $9
March 10, 1978 – Emerson, Lake & Palmer – $7
March 11, 1978 – Waylon Jennings w/Jessi Colter – $7, $6
March 15, 1978 – The Lettermen – $7.50. $6.50
March 17, 1978 – Rush w/The Babys and Pat Travers – $6
March 18, 1978 – Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn – $6.50, $5.50
April 1, 1978 – J.D. Sumner – $6, $5
April 7, 1978 – Blue Oyster Cult w/Angel and Godz – $7
April 14, 1978 – Willie Nelson w/Emmylou Harris – $8, $7
April 20, 1978 – Ronnie Milsap w/Eddie Rabbit – $7.50, $6.50
April 29, 1978 – Journey w/Montrose – $6
May 19, 1978 – Larry Gatlin – $7
June 3, 1978 – Foreigner w/Head East – $7
June 23, 1978 – REO Speedwagon w/Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow, Ronnie James Dio, Cozy Powell, Nantucket – $7
July 4, 1978 – B.J. Thomas – $7.50, $6.50
July 7, 1978 – Johnny Paycheck w/R.C. Cannon – $6, $5
July 12, 1978 – Kansas w/Dudek Finnegan Krueger Band – $7
August 18, 1978 – Seals & Croft w/Eddie Money – $7.50, $6.50
Sept. 1, 1978 – Doobie Brothers w/Wet Willie – $7
Sept. 9, 1978 – AC/DC w/Cheap Trick and The Dictators – $5
Oct. 13, 1978 – Harlem Globetrotters – $6, $5
Oct. 14, 1978 – Outlaws w/Pat Travers – $7
Oct. 21, 1978 – Ferrante & Teicher – $8, $7
November 2, 1978 – Kenny Rogers w/Eddie Rabbit and Dottie West – $7.50, $6.50
Oct. 28, 1978 – Bob Seger Silver Bullet Band
Nov. 3, 1978 – Charlie Daniels Band – $6
Nov. 9, 1978 – Chicago – $8.50
Dec. 2, 1978 – Statler Brothers w/Barbara Mandrell – $7.50, $6.50, $5.50
Dec. 26, 1978 – Atlanta Rhythm Section w/Ambrosia $6
Jan. 6, 1979 – Styx w/Cindy Bullens – $7
Jan. 24-25, 1979 – Red Skelton – $12, $10
Jan. 27, 1979 – Boston w/Sammy Hagar – $7
Feb. 2, 1979 – Heart w/Firefall – $7
Feb. 10, 1979 – Merle Haggard w/Marty Robbins – $8, $7
March 3, 1979 – Sha Na Na – $7.50, $6.50
March 16, 1979 – Waylon Jennings w/Buddy Holly’s Original Crickets – $8, $7
March 17, 1979 – Rush w/Angel – $7
March 23, 1979 – Charlie Pride – $7.50, $6.50
April 5, 1979 – Don Williams w/Charlie McCoy and Barefoot Jerry $7.50, $6.50
April 7, 1979 – Eddie Rabbit w/Gail Davies – $7.50
April 14, 1979 – Black Oak Arkansas w/Stillwater and Brownsville Station – $6.50
April 17, 1979 – Eric Clapton w/Muddy Waters – $7.50
April 27, 1979 – Cheap Trick w/TKO – $6.50
May 5, 1979 – Tom Jones w/Freddie Roman $12, $10
May 11, 1979 – Mahogany Rush w/Blackfoot and April Wine – $7
May 12, 1979 – Willie Nelson w/Leon Russell – $8, $6
May 19, 1979 – Oak Ridge Boys w/Emmylou Harris – $8, $7
June 5, 1979 – Lawrence Welk – $8.50, $7.50
June 16, 1979 – Nazareth w/Mahogany Rush – $7
July 7, 1979 – England Dan & John Ford Coley w/Counterphase – $8, $7, $6
July 27, 1979 – Molly Hatchet
Aug. 24, 1979 – Blackfoot w/Nantucket – $4
Sept. 14, 1979 – Moe Bandy w/Joe Stampley – $6, $5
Sept. 22, 1979 – Little River Band
Sept. 28, 1979 – AC/DC w/Sammy Hagar and Mothers Finest
Oct. 6, 1979 – Johnny Paycheck w/Bellamy Brothers
Oct. 20, 1979 – Blue Oyster Cult w/Rainbow – $7 plus 50 cents parking
Oct. 26, 1979 – Peter Frampton w/Pat Travers and Mothers Finest $8 plus parking
Nov. 3, 1979 – Larry Gatlin – $7, $6
Nov. 17, 1979 – Conway Twitty w/Ronnie McDowell – $8, $7
Nov. 23, 1979 – Harlem Globetrotters – $6, $5
Nov. 24, 1979 – REO w/Ronnie Montrose – $7
Nov. 30, 1979 – Statler Brothers w/Barbara Mandrell – $8, $7
Dec. 8, 1979 – Foreigner w/Wet Willie and Nantucket – $8
Dec. 14, 1979 – ZZ Top w/Point Blank – $8
Freedom Hall kicked off the eighties with teen idol Rex Smith (“You Take My Breath Away”) on Jan. 11, 1980. Tickets were $8 and $7.

Rock and roll didn’t suddenly cease coming to Freedom Hall with the advent of the eighties. Alice Cooper, AC/DC, Van Halen and Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons all performed in 1980. But David and I had to draw the line somewhere. If you want a list of eighties acts, you’ll have to make your own. Count on spending four hours per year searching microfilm.

Willie Nelson & Family @ Clay Center for the Arts, Charleston, WV (May 10, 2012) (SOLD OUT)

Friday, May 10th, 2019
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This day in Willie Nelson history: “Always on My Mind” #1 (May 8, 1982)

Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

On May 8, 1982, Willie Nelson’s “Always On My Mind” reaches #1 on the Billboard country chart.

In 1983, Willie Nelson wins Best Country Vocal Performance for ‘Always On My Mind. The song won three times during the 25th annual Grammy awards including awards for songwriters Wayne Carson, Johnny Christopher and Mark James earn Song of the Year.

Track listing

  1. “Do Right Woman, Do Right Man”
  2. “Always on My Mind”
  3. “A Whiter Shade of Pale”
  4. “Let It Be Me”
  5. “Staring Each Other Down”
  6. “Bridge over Troubled Water”
  7. “Old Fords and a Natural Stone”
  8. “Permanently Lonely”
  9. “Last Thing I Needed First Thing This Morning”
  10. “The Party’s Over”

2003 re-release bonus tracks

  1. “The Man Who Owes Everyone”
  2. “I’m a Memory”

This day in Willie Nelson history, “It’s a Long Story: My Life”, by Willie Nelson (May 5, 2015)

Sunday, May 5th, 2019

Willie Nelson, Atlanta, Georgia (May 4, 2013)

Saturday, May 4th, 2019
andrewsnook11

www.examiner.com
by:  Andrew Snook

See lots more of Andrew Snook’s photos here. 

Willie Nelson played to a group of hard-core fans Saturday night at Chastain Park Amphitheater in Atlanta, Georgia. On one of the worst weather days of the year in Atlanta when more than 3 inches of rain fell during the day and into the evening many of those who purchased tickets chose not to brave the downpour and see the country legend in action.

It really was an ugly weather evening at the open-air amphitheater with torrential rain pouring all evening long. Those that did brave the weather were rewarded with an evening of classic country songs by one of country music’s giants.

View slideshow: Willie Nelson at Chastain Park Amphitheater in Atlanta, May 4, 2013.

From the opening refrains of “Happy Birthday to me” celebrating his 80th birthday on April 30th to “Whiskey River” and beyond, Willie Nelson delivered a great concert for those who came. No doubt they went home soaked but there is also no doubt they went home happy in the knowledge they has seen a country legend deliver another great performance.

andrewsnook12


Photo of Bobbie Nelson, by Andrew Snook