Archive for the ‘Duets and collaborations’ Category

Willie Nelson and Paul McCartney

Thursday, April 12th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Amos Lee, Mickey Raphael, “El Camino”

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

Willie Nelson and Lukas Nelson, “Just Breathe”

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018

Wynton Marsalis talks about 30 years of Jazz at Lincoln Center

Friday, March 30th, 2018

www.billboard.com
by:  Ron Hart

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra operating under the leadership of New Orleans trumpet great Wynton Marsalis, who co-founded the program in 1987 (the Orchestra was started the following year) and serves as both its managing and artistic director. And during that time, the JLCO has established a body of work that’s explored some of the deepest aspects of American history, from the country’s oldest Baptist church to New Orleans’ Congo Square to the roots of the nation’s most beloved children’s songs.

Between 2003 and 2007, Marsalis and his legendary septet hosted some of the biggest names in pop, rock, blues, country and R&B at the Jazz at Lincoln Center Spring Galas. Within that five-year stretch, the Wynton Septet jammed with an unparalleled cast of talent that included such names as Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Willie Nelson, Natalie Merchant, Lyle Lovett, John Legend, James Taylor, Lenny Kravitz, Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks and, in one of his final appearances onstage, the late Ray Charles.

United We Swing collects the cream of these gala performances for an album whose proceeds are going to Jazz at Lincoln Center’s much-needed educational programs. And much like his work with the JLCO, these songs — when sequenced together across this 16-track collection — tells the crucial American tale of the union between jazz and the blues, and the way by which both genres have served as spiritual turbines propelling the people’s history of this country through the generations. Marsalis took the time to speak with Billboard about releasing an album like United We Swingin a time when our nation has never felt more divided.

Even though they played different forms of music, they really were kindred spirits, Willie Nelson and Ray Charles, huh? The soul they projected in their music, I’m talking about.

‘Hey, if you think about Willie Nelson, Ray Charles and Louis Armstrong, the three of them have something in common, which is that all three of them are credible in the blues, they could swing the gospel tradition, they can sing from the Great American Songbook, they can play jazz and improvise incredibly and they can sing country songs. It’s incredible.’

Read entire article here. 

Recorded between 2003 and 2007, United We Swing: Best of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Galas finds an unparalleled array of music talent that collectively boasts 94 Grammy Awards joining Jazz at Lincoln Center Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis (a nine-time Grammy Award winner himself) and some of the world’s top jazz musicians to perform blues-inflected versions of iconic American repertoire.

Those one-night-only, live performances have never been released before. They include Willie Nelson on “Milk Cow Blues, Lenny Kravitz performing Marsalis’s hypnotizing, New Orleans-inflected arrangement of Kravitz’s own song, “Are You Gonna Go My Way”; Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks uniting for a stirring, infectious take on Civil Rights anthem “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free”; Bob Dylan adding harmonica licks to a deeply felt, in-the-pocket rendition of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”; and Ray Charles taking the stage for one of his final performances to play “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town.”

Together these artists raise their voices to highlight jazz’s importance to America’s cultural heritage and to remind us that, even in divided times, music can unite us all. All proceeds from the album will go toward Jazz at Lincoln Center’s education programs, which introduce thousands of children to jazz each year.

Congratulations, Johnny Gimble, 2018 Inductee into Country Music Hall of Fame

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

www.tennessean.com

Ricky Skaggs, Dottie West and Johnny Gimble achieved country music’s greatest honor on Tuesday morning when they were announced as this year’s inductees into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

The emotional event, hosted by Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood, was held in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum‘s rotunda, where plaques commemorating the Hall’s 133 previous inductees adorn the walls.

The Class of 2018, which was selected by an anonymous panel of industry leaders assembled by the CMA, will officially be inducted into the Hall of Fame during a medallion ceremony in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s CMA Theater later this year.

In 1949, he began playing with the king of Western Swing, Bob Wills, as part of his Texas Playboys band; three years later, Gimble fiddled on Marty Robbins’ debut single, “I’ll Go on Alone,” which topped the country charts.

He moved to Nashville in the late 1960s. In Music City, he was an in-demand session player. He appeared on now-classic recordings like Connie Smith’s “If It Ain’t Love,” Merle Haggard’s “If We Make It Through December,” Chet Atkins’ 1974 album “Superpickers” and George Strait’s version of “Right or Wrong.”

Over his 60-plus years in music, Gimble won two Grammys for his work with Western Swing outfit Asleep at the Wheel, five Instrumentalist of the Year Awards from the Country Music Association and Fiddler of the Year Awards from the Academy of Country Music. In 1994, he was awarded a prestigious National Heritage Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Arts.

He appeared multiple times on “A Prairie Home Companion” and “Austin City Limits. In 2010, released his final album “Celebrating with Friends,” a collection of collaborations with artists like Nelson, Haggard, Ray Benson, Dale Watson, Vince Gill and others.

Gimble died May 9, 2015 at the age of 88.

His son, Dick, and granddaughter Emily performed Gimble’s jaunty “Under the ‘X’ in Texas” in his memory during the induction announcement. Daughter Cyndy paraphrased her father: “The money, the awards, that stuff’s nice. But the magic, that’s what keeps you playing. That’s what never wears off.”

Read entire article:
https://www.tennessean.com/story/entertainment/music/2018/03/27/country-music-hall-fame-reveals-class-2018/431755002/

“This Land is Your Land” — Finale, Farm Aid 1987

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

“We close the show with Woody Guthrie’s love song to America.”
Farm Aid 1987

Waylon & Willie, “Just to Satisfy You”

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

Willie Nelson and Ray Benson and Asleep at the Wheel

Saturday, March 17th, 2018

Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, “Sitting on the Dock of the Bay”

Friday, March 16th, 2018

In 1982, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings took their version of the Otis Redding classic, “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,” to the country charts.

www.RollingStone.com
by: Stephen L. Betts

R&B singer Otis Redding played California’s Monterey Pop Festival in the middle of 1967’s hippie-and-flower-powered “Summer of Love,” he was one of only two soul singers to perform at the three-day festival. The event would be a turning point in Redding’s career, expanding his fan base to include white audiences throughout the U.S. and Europe. California would play a major role in the single that would become his biggest solo hit, an enduring R&B-pop classic which hit Number One 50 years ago today and has since been covered by dozens of artists, including a legendary pair of country outlaws. Redding, however, would not live to experience its success or its enduring legacy.

Days after the festival ended, Redding was on rock promoter Bill Graham’s houseboat, which was docked in Waldo Point Harbor in Sausalito, California. From the boat, looking out at Richardson Bay (not the more poetic-sounding “Frisco Bay” as depicted in the lyrics), Redding began writing the first verse to the tune that would become his signature song. Songwriter-musician Steve Cropper, guitarist with Stax Records house band Booker T. & the M.G.’s, co-wrote “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay” with Redding, but when the musicians went into the studio in late November of 1967 to cut it, the end result represented a stylistic change for Redding, veering into mellow, yet sophisticated, pop territory.

In early December, Redding and his backing band the Bar-Kays flew to Nashville for the first of three scheduled shows that weekend. On the morning of December 10th, Redding and all but two of the Bar-Kays were killed when their twin-engine plane plummeted into Lake Monona, just three minutes from their destination in Madison, Wisconsin. Redding was 26 years old.

“(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay” was released in January 1968 and would become the first posthumous single to top Billboard‘s Hot 100, ascending to Number One on March 16th and holding the top spot for four consecutive weeks. Other contemporaneous versions, by King Curtis and Latin-flavored band Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66, were minor hits, while artists including Cher, Peggy Lee and Glen Campbell also covered it at the time. Others who have cut it include David Allan Coe and Garth Brooks.

Willie Nelson and Sheryl Crow, “City of New Orleans”

Saturday, March 10th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Wynton Marsalis, Nora Jones, “Hit the Road Jack”

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Wynton Marsalis, Nora Jones, “Here We Go Again” (celebrating the genius of Ray Charles)

Tuesday, March 6th, 2018

01. Hallelujah I Love Her So (Gospel 2-beat / Boogaloo / 4/4 Swing)
02. Come Rain or Come Shine (Walking Ballad)
03. Unchain My Heart (Bolero with Habanera bass)
04. Cryin’ Time (Country Ballad)
05. Losing Hand (Dirge with Chain-Gang Shuffle)
06. Hit The Road Jack (Gospel 2-beat / 4/4 Swing)
07. I’m Moving On (Boogaloo with Afro-Latin Backbeat / 4/4 Swing)
08. Busted (Gospel 12/8 Shuffle)
09. Here We Go Again (Rhythm & Blues 12/8 Shuffle)
10. Makin’ Whoopie (Hard-Bop 2-beat / 4/4 Swing)
11. I Love You So Much (It Hurts) (Waltz)
12. What’d I Say (Boogaloo)

Willie Nelson and Glen Campbell nominated for ACM Award for Vocal Event of the Year, “Funny, How Time Slips Away.”

Saturday, March 3rd, 2018
Image may contain: 1 person, on stage, playing a musical instrument and guitar
www.broadwayworld.com

Music legends Willie Nelson and Glen Campbell have been nominated for the Academy of Country Music Award for Vocal Event of the Year for their poignant duet “Funny How Time Slips Away.” The 53 rd Academy of Country Music Awards will air live on Sunday April 15, at 8 PM ET/PT on the CBS Television Network.

“I’m so proud of my dad and so glad his music is still being enjoyed and recognized in the music community. He always put his heart and soul into every song he ever sang,” said Ashley Campbell.

Written by Nelson 57 years ago, “Funny How Time Slips Away” was recorded for Campbell’s Grammy -nominated farewell album, Adis, released in June 2017 via UMe to rave reviews. The collaboration between longtime friends takes on a new gravitas as the two trailblazers reflect back together on where the years went. Hailed by Rolling Stone as “a marvelous, albeit heartbreaking, tribute to their enduring love and respect for one another,” the song is even more significant following Campbell’s death last year from Alzheimer’s. In November, the collaboration won the Country Music Association Award for Musical Event of the Year.

Adis capped off an extraordinary career for Campbell that spanned more than six decades and 50 million albums sold. Hailed as one of the best of his career, the album received an incredible reaction around the world from the likes of Rolling Stone, USA Today, NPR, Uncut and many others. It debuted in the Top 40 of the Billboard 200 garnering Campbell his 16th Top 40 album and his 19th Top 10 Country Record.<

The album Campbell had always wanted to do, Adis was recorded following his “Goodbye Tour” which he launched after revealing he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Produced by longtime friend and bandmate, Carl Jackson, the 12-track collection features Campbell singing songs from some of his favorite songwriters like Jimmy Webb, his longtime collaborator behind some of his biggest hits like “Wichita Lineman,” “By The Time I Get To Phoenix,” and “Galveston,” and the title track. Other songwriters featured include Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Fred Neil, Roger Miller, Jerry Reed and Dickey Lee.

Last year, their collaboration won the 2017 AMA Award for Musical Event of the Year.

Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash, “Storytellers”

Saturday, March 3rd, 2018

Willie Nelson, Kimmie Rhodes, “Til I Can Gain Control Again”

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018