Archive for the ‘Kinky Friedman’ Category

Monday, June 9th, 2014

williekinky

Willie Nelson & Kinky Friedman phone in their support for legalization of marijuana

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

Willie Nelson campaigning for Kinky Friedman during a 2009 stop in Plano.
Credit:  starlocalmedia.com

Icons Willie Nelson and Kinky Friedman recently conducted a Texas Herbal Radio Network tour live from Willie’s bus, chatting about a passionate topic for the two Texans – Pot.

The legalization of marijuana, the cultivation of hemp, and the potential benefits to Texas’ small farmers were the main topics of discussion.

As the host of Notably Texan,  I jumped at the opportunity to speak briefly with these two legends about their favorite green, leafy subject.

Willie Nelson’s new album “Band Of Brothers” is set to release in June, and Kinky Friedman’s hat is in the political arena once more with a runoff bid for Texas Agriculture Commissioner on May 27.

Notably Texan is heard weekdays from Noon-3pm, and Saturdays 7-Midnight on KETR.

 

Willie Nelson will jam with Kinky Friedman TONIGHT! @ Charley’s, Pa’ai, (Kinky’s spreading Texas Liberation Across the Pacific)

Saturday, December 7th, 2013

Kinky Friedman's Liberation Tour Poster
www.KinkyFriedman.com

Kinky Friedman’s Texas Liberation Tour Heads to Australia and Hawaii

Saturday, December 7th
Charley’s
142 Hana Highway
Pa’ai, Maui, Hawaii
(808) 579-8085
Tickets:  $30.00
Doors:  7:30 p.m.; Show:  8:30 p.m.

Why Not Kinky? (How hard can it be)

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

kinky2

By Anna M. Tinsley

FORT WORTH — Kinky Friedman doesn’t know whether he’s ready to jump back into Texas politics.

But the cigar-chewing humorist and musician — known for the black attire and cowboy hats he normally dons — said he may soon create an exploratory committee to help him decide whether to run for office again.

And if so, for which one.

“Maybe I should do what Rick Perry does and pray for an answer on what to do,” Friedman, 68, said with a chuckle Tuesday during a telephone interview with the Star-Telegram.

Some political observers say they wouldn’t be surprised to see Friedman run for nearly any statewide office.

“A comedian needs an audience,” said Harvey Kronberg, editor and publisher of the Austin-based Quorum Report, an online political newsletter.

Friedman said he probably will run as a Democrat, as he did during his unsuccessful 2010 bid for Texas agriculture commissioner, rather than as an independent, as he did in his failed 2006 gubernatorial bid.

“I’m keeping my options open,” said Friedman, a self-proclaimed Jewish cowboy who lives in the Hill Country.

Friedman may talk some about politics during a scheduled Saturday night performance at the Queen City Music Hall in Fort Worth with Joe Bill Rose and Charla Corn.

During past campaigns, Friedman became known everything from his one-liners — “I can’t screw things up any worse than they already are” — to the fact he had a talking action figure doll to help raise funds for his 2006 gubernatorial bid.

On Tuesday, he outlined his top two political priorities if elected: legalizing marijuana use and casino gambling.

“Texas is going to do all this in the next 10 to 15 years,” he said. “But by then, he will be the caboose on the train.”

Making his top two priorities reality, Friedman said, will provide a key boost for Texas’ economy.

Legalizing casinos in Texas would “stop the bleeding from all the billions of dollars that are walking out of the state for gambling,” he said.

And making marijuana use legal in Texas, he said, “would put a real crimp in the Mexican drug cartels — and make Willie Nelson very happy.”

“There is a constituency for both of his issues,” Kronberg said. “Neither one seems as revolutionary or as anti-establishment as they might have seemed 10 years ago.

“Virtually every poll shows voters at least want the right to vote on casino gambling. And there’s a huge untapped group of supporters for marijuana” legalization,” he said. “Maybe he’s on to something.”

Friedman said he was impressed by state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, this summer after her lengthy filibuster temporarily killed a comprehensive abortion bill Republicans supported. The measure ultimately passed during a second special session.

“I haven’t met Wendy yet, … but I’m a big fan of filibusters — the ones that are charismatic,” he said. “And she did a great one.”

Davis, he said, faces a tough decision in the next few months: whether to run for another term representing state Senate District 10 or take advantage of the worldwide attention she has received since her filibuster and seek a higher office.

“She’s a smart cookie,” he said. “There’s a great draft movement for Wendy, but if she runs, this isn’t a great time for Democrats to run for governor, especially since the other candidates have all the money.”

The key to a 2014 victory for any Democrat, he said, is motivating Texas independents to head to the polls and vote.

But some Democrats haven’t forgotten that Friedman picked up nearly 550,000 votes in his independent 2006 gubernatorial bid, which could have gone to Democrat Chris Bell, who lost to Republican Gov. Rick Perry by 406,455 votes.

Friedman said an “old-style Democrat” such as Harry Truman or Dolph Briscoe could win a statewide office — something no one else in the party has been able to do since 1994.

“Democrats have got to think two moves ahead. They need to expand the party,” he said. “There’s a huge number of disgruntled voters.

“Before the state turns blue, it has to go purple. There are a hell of a lot of purple people out there.”

Anna Tinsley, 817-390-7610 Twitter: @annatinsley

Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/07/23/5022661/humorist-kinky-friedman-considering.html#storylink=cpy

Willie Nelson, “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die:. (Forward by Kinky Friedman)

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

http://blog.sfgate.com
by: David Downs

Poet-philosopher and outlaw country music legend Willie Nelson released memoir Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die Nov. 13 in hardcover. The breezy, funny chapbook mixes never-before-heard stories, life lessons, and loads of jokes; with a foreword by author, singer, and cult provocateur Kinky Friedman.

An author of 35 books himself, Kinky took a few minutes to chat with Smell the Truth via phone from his ranch in Texas, where he was preparing for the second phase of his Bi-Polar Tour, which starts Nov. 30 in Kansas City, MO. and ends Dec. 20 in Eugene, OR.

Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die began as a co-writing project with Willie, Kinky says, but Nelson’s editor wanted one star, and Willie didn’t want an editor at all.

“The editor only wanted one voice, then Willie says ‘I’m not going to write it if you’re not going to write it’. It was like Tom Sawyer painting a fence. I had to write 27,000 words of which the foreword is all that survived.

“But that title makes sense and is brilliant and a great statement,” Friedman says. “The book gives you some insights into Willie’s actual mind, which are always interesting and diverting and funny and enlightening. It’s music. It’s jokes. It’s a story about farting on an airplane – things like that. And it’s kind of where he is today.

“He is pushing 80 and he was concerned about his mortality – as anybody would be,” Friedman said. “God knows how you feel at that age. Most of Willie’s friends and contemporaries are dead. He’s got some real wisdom.”

“Something about what he is doing is working. He is really honestly connecting with people in a way that’s different than most artists or entertainers. Everybody thinks that they’re Willie’s friend and that’s true, from the doorman, to the guy loading the garbage truck. I’ve been around with Dylan. People are in awe of Bob Dylan, but they certainly don’t come over and say, ‘Hey, Bob, how are you? My name’s Bill.’ And it’s a good thing they don’t.”

Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die is easy to pick up and put down, making it great light reading over the holiday vacation. Here’s Nelson:

on exercise:
“Work out, work out, and work out.”

on drug legalization:
“Addiction should be treated as a disease.”

and on President Obama:
“I think that once you become President, the first thing you realize is that you can’t do shit.”

Friedman shares Nelson’s point of view on legalized pot, saying “we got prisons full of people that shouldn’t be there, meanwhile all the pedophiles and politicians run around free.”

And Friedman echoes Nelson’s contempt for corporate Nashville country music.

“Somebody is recording this shit and somebody is listening to it, I guess, and it must be making money, but I can’t think of any classics, anything great that have been written in the past 30 years in Nashville,” Friedman says.Like the book, Friedman’s Bi-Polar tour – which pulls into San Francisco Dec. 18– mixes songs, stories, jokes, and politics. Friedman says exploring another run for Governor of Texas.

“I think we really got a good shot at it. It’s a giant step down from musician to politician and I would only take it for Texas.”

Friedman’s also hawking a new solo CD, Live From Woodstock, a new tequila Kinky Friedman’s Man in Black Tequila, and branded cigar the Kinky Cristo. The music, the tequila, and the cigar all pack Kinky’s trademark punch and sting.

“It’s something that really got to zing for me to feel it,” he said. “We’re a homogenized, sanitized, trivialized culture already. I only have two tastebuds left but they are having a hell of a party.”

Kinky Friedman talks about Willie Nelson, and “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die”

Friday, November 30th, 2012

http://blog.sfgate.com
by: David Downs

 Poet-philosopher and outlaw country music legend Willie Nelson released memoir Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die Nov. 13 in hardcover. The breezy, funny chapbook mixes never-before-heard stories, life lessons, and loads of jokes; with a foreword by author, singer, and cult provocateur Kinky Friedman.

An author of 35 books himself, Kinky took a few minutes to chat with Smell the Truth via phone from his ranch in Texas, where he was preparing for the second phase of his Bi-Polar Tour, which starts Nov. 30 in Kansas City, MO. and ends Dec. 20 in Eugene, OR.

Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die began as a co-writing project with Willie, Kinky says, but Nelson’s editor wanted one star, and Willie didn’t want an editor at all.

“The editor only wanted one voice, then Willie says ‘I’m not going to write it if you’re not going to write it’. It was like Tom Sawyer painting a fence. I had to write 27,000 words of which the foreword is all that survived.

“But that title makes sense and is brilliant and a great statement,” Friedman says. “The book gives you some insights into Willie’s actual mind, which are always interesting and diverting and funny and enlightening. It’s music. It’s jokes. It’s a story about farting on an airplane – things like that. And it’s kind of where he is today.

“He is pushing 80 and he was concerned about his mortality – as anybody would be,” Friedman said. “God knows how you feel at that age. Most of Willie’s friends and contemporaries are dead. He’s got some real wisdom.”

“Something about what he is doing is working. He is really honestly connecting with people in a way that’s different than most artists or entertainers. Everybody thinks that they’re Willie’s friend and that’s true, from the doorman, to the guy loading the garbage truck. I’ve been around with Dylan. People are in awe of Bob Dylan, but they certainly don’t come over and say, ‘Hey, Bob, how are you? My name’s Bill.’ And it’s a good thing they don’t.”

Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die is easy to pick up and put down, making it great light reading over the holiday vacation. Here’s Nelson:

on exercise:
“Work out, work out, and work out.”

on drug legalization:
“Addiction should be treated as a disease.”

and on President Obama:
“I think that once you become President, the first thing you realize is that you can’t do shit.”

Friedman shares Nelson’s point of view on legalized pot, saying “we got prisons full of people that shouldn’t be there, meanwhile all the pedophiles and politicians run around free.”

And Friedman echoes Nelson’s contempt for corporate Nashville country music.

“Somebody is recording this shit and somebody is listening to it, I guess, and it must be making money, but I can’t think of any classics, anything great that have been written in the past 30 years in Nashville,” Friedman says.Like the book, Friedman’s Bi-Polar tour – which pulls into San Francisco Dec. 18– mixes songs, stories, jokes, and politics. Friedman says exploring another run for Governor of Texas.

“I think we really got a good shot at it. It’s a giant step down from musician to politician and I would only take it for Texas.”

Friedman’s also hawking a new solo CD, Live From Woodstock, a new tequila Kinky Friedman’s Man in Black Tequila, and branded cigar the Kinky Cristo. The music, the tequila, and the cigar all pack Kinky’s trademark punch and sting.

“It’s something that really got to zing for me to feel it,” he said. “We’re a homogenized, sanitized, trivialized culture already. I only have two tastebuds left but they are having a hell of a party.”

Kinky Friedman talks about writing a book with Willie Nelson

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012
 Curious how one writes a book with Willie Nelson, I spoke with Friedman over the phone at the Utopia Animal Rescue Ranch, a “never kill” sanctuary he founded in Medina, Tex.What was your role in co-writing the book “Roll Me Up And Smoke Me (When I Die) this book with Willie?

I just made sure it all rolled along. If Willie is really productive and creative, like he was this time, then it’s all good. If Willie disappears or decides he doesn’t want to do it, then I’m on the hook. I recently wrote a book with Billy Bob Thornton called The Billy Bob Tapes, which came out 4 or 5 months ago. Billy wound up doing it almost entirely by himself. He recorded it, and I helped guide it. I liked the way he did it, in that he had the word “fucking” in just about every sentence. Of course, editors and lawyers and agents sanitized it, and in doing so they homogenized it and trivialized it. But it’s still a very thoughtful book.

Did Willie write most of this one, too?

Willie wrote voluminously. And he got mad because I wasn’t. If I wrote 20,000 words, he wrote 27,000. It was like Tom Sawyer painting the fence.

Were you two traveling together on tour?

I’d travel on the bus with him. It was a rough time in a lot of ways, with the death of Bee Spears and Poodie, his stage manager who really embodied the spirit of whatever Willie Nelson represents. Here these younger guys are dying when everybody’s expecting Willie to die. But he’s still kicking strong.

How much does the book cover that hasn’t been covered before?

Well, writing about Willie is like writing about Jesus or Moses: You don’t want all the Biblical commentary because everybody already knows it. This book is postcards from the road. It’s Willie talking right to you. Willie writes obliquely, like Bill Clinton with the Democratic convention speech. Not once in that four and half hour speech did Bill mention that he was raised in poverty by a single mother in the south. Willie’s not trying to paint his masterpiece. The guy who sets out to do so never does. He has an artistic vision for just about everything. As Tom Waits said: How you do anything is how you do everything.

How concerned was Willie about maintaining control of the voice and the final product?

Things got a bit acrimonious now and then. At one point I said: “We gotta get this to the editor!” And Willie said: “What editor? We’re the editor. If you wrote a song, would you send it to me to edit it? I might have a suggestion, but that’d be it. I’m not going to edit your song.”

What would you say the—

The point is: The first half of Willie’s life, people were telling him what to do and how to do it, like Chet Atkins at the record company. They were convinced the guy couldn’t sing. He was a songwriter, they said, not a singer. But those same people that couldn’t hear the biggest single of the year: “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.” Red-headed Stranger didn’t catch on until it got to the D.J. level. Too many told him, “Do wear a turtleneck,” “Don’t wear a turtleneck.” That’s where the “outlaw” Willie came from. He wasn’t going to let the record companies hand-pick the songs, the musicians, the clothing anymore. That spirit lives on in this book.

How long have you guys known each other?

I‘ve known him since Christ was a cowboy. I say we met on the gangplank of Noah’s Ark. But honestly, I don’t remember how or when I met anybody.

Neil Young stopped smoking pot for his book. I can’t imagine Willie did.

You can pretty well bet your ass he did not. In this book we really wanted to get a glimpse of who Willie is. I’ve traveled with Bob Dylan as well as Willie. With Willie, everybody thinks they’re his friend, which they are. Garbage collectors, doormen: they all approach and say hello. With Bob, no one approaches. There’s a certain distance there. But my hats off to both of them for just being out there.

Has Willie Nelson given you any advice that sticks with you?

Before I ran for governor of Texas in 2005, Willie told me: “If you’re going to have sex with an animal, always make it a horse. That way, if it doesn’t work out, you’ll always have a ride home.” That has served me very well in politics and in life.

read entire article here. 

Kinky Friedman, backstage at a Willie Nelson Show

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Austin 4-21 182

Kinky Friedman hung out with fans and friends backstage at the Back Yard on April 21, 2012.

Austin 4-21 184
Kinky and CherieAustin 4-21 181
with Mickey Raphael

Kinky Friedman’s ‘Willie Nelson’ cigars

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Willie Nelson’s birthday is in April, so it only seems right that our Cigar of the Month for April is a stick with a pigtail twist, The Willie. In honor of the Red Headed Stranger, we’re offering an exceptionally-priced Cigar of the Month trial pack, free shipping, and special savings on full boxes and, The Willie gifts with purchase deals all in the Kinky Friedman Cigars store.


www.kinkyfriedmancigars.com

You rarely see a shaggy foot on a cigar, and The Willie is nothing if not unusual. The uncut end makes for an easy light, and the first few puffs explode with smoke, awakening the palate before mellowing into ultra-creamy coffee with vanilla and a hint of spice, and then later, chocolate flavors.

The Willie is hand-rolled to 6 x 48, with a beautiful Honduran wrapper draped over choice Costa Rican binder and fine long-leaf Honduran and Nicaraguan filler tobaccos.

The cigar is finished with a pigtail; the end of the wrapper is expertly rolled into a tight scroll and then tied in a knot at the head. Pigtails don’t have a cap and can easily be bitten off instead of cut (we’re pretty sure that’s what Willie would want).Billy Joe Shaver may be Kinky’s Spiritual Advisor, but Kinky’s long-time friend and would-be Energy Czar, Willie Nelson, has also been known to wax philosophical. Here are some of our favorite words of wisdom from Willie:

Let the jerks of the world serve as the perfect example of what you don’t want to be.
Don’t let your thoughts think you.
If everyone just takes care of their own area then we won’t have any problems.
Be here. Be present. Wherever you are, be there.
The wisdom is in the moments when the madness slips away and we remember the basics.
Cruelty is all out of ignorance.
Smoke a Kinky Friedman Cigars cigar every day (OK, maybe he didn’t exactly say this one – we still think it’s good advice)!

Good advice

Friday, December 9th, 2011

“Willie Nelson gave me some good advice once: If you’re going to sleep with an  animal, make it a horse. That way, if things don’t work out, you can always get  a ride home.”

— Kinky Friedman

Kinky Friedman talks about new album with Willie Nelson

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011


www.theaustralian.com.au
by Ian Cuthbertson

Musician, writer and two-time aspirant for governor of Texas Kinky Friedman is touring with Van Dyke Parks, of Beach Boys fame.

“A lot of things I’m doing lately just seem to be working out,” the veteran country singer says. He’s talking about Kinky Willie, a forthcoming album of covers of his satirical songs performed by old friend Willie Nelson. Then there’s Becoming Kinky: The World According to Kinky Friedman, a play about his life that opened in his native Texas in March.

He’s also halfway through a book project with actor and fellow country music performer Billy Bob Thornton, with the entirely Friedman-esque title Hey Me, I’m Talking to You.

Friedman found fame with country comedy songs such as Asshole from El Paso (a parody of Merle Haggard’s Okie from Muskogee) and They Ain’t Makin’ Jews like Jesus Anymore, in which the protagonist beats up a drunken white racist who berates blacks, Jews and Greeks in a bar.

But even if you’re not a fan of his music, mostly recorded as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, or of his very successful line in detective novels, chances are the name will ring a bell.

That’s because the 66-year-old Texan (“I’m too young for Medicare and too old for women to care”) is something of a latter-day Mark Twain, dispensing epigrams and getting quoted in the world’s press on everything from politics to gay rights.

He once offered Bill Clinton a Cuban cigar but the president refused, citing a US boycott of Cuban goods. “Don’t look at it like we are supporting their agricultural products,” Friedman told Clinton. “Think of it as we’re burning their crops.”

And Friedman’s is very likely the most quoted line on gay marriage: “Why shouldn’t gays be allowed to be as miserable as everybody else?”

Now, the two-time aspirant for governor of Texas, crime novelist, cigar manufacturer and country singer is on his way here for a national tour, performing as a duo with Van Dyke Parks, surely the oddest pairing in popular music history since David Bowie and Bing Crosby got together to sing The Little Drummer Boy.

Parks, 68, is best known for his work as a lyricist on the lost Beach Boys album Smile, which he finally toured with Brian Wilson in 2004. However, Parks began his career as a child actor, appearing with Grace Kelly in the 1956 film The Swan. He has also worked extensively as an arranger, producer and player on albums by artists including the Byrds, Loudon Wainwright III and Ry Cooder. He worked with Silverchair as orchestral arranger on its 2001 album Diorama and again on 2006’s Young Modern.

Though Friedman admits he is not entirely sure what the two will be doing on their upcoming tour, other than playing separately and together, he has no doubt about their compatibility.

“We’ve been friends since Christ was a cowboy,” Friedman tells The Australian. “We met on the gangplank of Noah’s Ark.”

The two first played together in the 1980s when Parks, for a time, joined the Jewboys. They played again recently in Los Angeles, with Parks sitting in on accordion and keyboards, and both found the experience enjoyable.

“Van Dyke has mostly been conducting orchestras in Europe lately,” Friedman says. “So on this tour he’ll be drinking Australian wine and I’ll be drinking Mexican mouthwash.”

One of the secrets of Friedman’s appeal is his willingness, not entirely common among American country singers, to be the butt of his own jokes. “My oeuvre consists of 31 books that I’ve churned out, I mean carefully crafted,” he says of his literary output.

Friedman promises to bring copies of his latest work, Heroes of a Texas Childhood, first published in 2009, to Australia with him.

“I’ll be signing copies after the show and I’ll be doing readings from the books as part of the show, so it’s kind of a literary, Mark Twain moment there,” Friedman says. “And, of course, after the show I will sign anything but bad legislation.”

This is surely a reference to the singer’s former political aspirations. His failed tilt for governor of Texas in 2006 with the campaign slogans “How Hard Could It Be?”, “Why The Hell Not?” and “He ain’t Kinky, he’s my Governor”, and as a Democrat last year (he failed to gain the party’s nomination) have scarred him. But the party’s loss is concert-goers’ gain. After his political and literary years, Friedman has taken to touring again with a vengeance.

“I was very fed up with politics. I wanted a purer art form and there is almost no higher calling than being a musician on the road,” the singer says.

“Sometimes it is art. Of course my definition of an artist is someone who is ahead of his time and behind on his rent.”

Asked if he comes from a stand-up comedy background, he says “No. I come from a stand-up tragedy background.”

The singer says being funny may have hurt him politically. “But, you know, that’s changing because on the current tour people are listening to every word,” he says. “Which just goes to show that if you fail at something for long enough eventually you become a legend.”

Never one to stand still, Friedman is keeping up with the times by releasing e-books on his website. “One of them is a collection of all my old columns that I wrote for the Texas Monthly,” he says.

“It’s called Drinker with a Writing Problem.”

Shhhh…. Willie Nelson and Kinky Friedman working on secret project

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

www.PopMatters.com
by Peta Anderson

Richard “Kinky” Friedman is a modern Renaissance man — he’s an author, comedian, politician, musician, animal-rights activist and cigar salesman. He’s been endorsed by Willie Nelson and is famous for his politically incorrect song “They Ain’t Making Jews Like Jesus Anymore.” Now, he’s touring the West Coast for the first time in almost 20 years, singing, talking and signing copies of his latest book, “Heroes of a Texas Childhood.”

In a quiet corner of a New Mexico casino, Friedman talks about Mexican mouthwash, Winston Churchill and Australia.

Popmatters: The latest book or movie that made you cry?

Friedman: Well, I’ve always said that there’s two things I can’t stand, and that’s a baby with a loaded diaper and a crying man. That’s what a bum told me in Nashville many years ago, Patrick O’Malley. Today we would call him a homeless person. As I would say, homeless go home. Maybe “Winston Churchill,” his biography, by Martin Gilbert.

Popmatters: The greatest album, ever?

Friedman: “Sweetheart of the Rodeo” by the Byrds.

Popmatters: Your ideal brain food?

Friedman: Well, I wouldn’t be spitting it, but it’d be Mexican mouthwash, Tequila.

Popmatters: You’re proud of this accomplishment, but why?

Friedman: Probably running for governor as an independent for four years before everybody came around to thinking the way I do. I was ahead of my time. And behind in my rent. So that makes me an artist.

Popmatters: You want to be remembered for … ?

Friedman: (Being) a drinker with a writing problem.

Popmatters: Of those who’ve come before, the most inspirational are?

Friedman: I like Moses and Jesus, who were two good Jewish boys who got in a little trouble with the government.

Popmatters: The creative masterpiece you wish bore your signature?

Friedman: That’s a tough one. Maybe the volume “Love is a Dog from Hell” by Charles Bukowski.

Popmatters: Your hidden talents … ?

Friedman: Hidden talents? It’s not so hidden, but irritating people. I think it’s a very good thing. It’s very Christ-like in a way. You know, he never had a home and never had a job, wasn’t married and traveled around the country with a band of long-haired friends irritating people. That was Jesus.

Popmatters: The best piece of advice you actually followed?

Friedman: Well, nobody takes good advice, but I like Winston Churchill’s “Keep calm and carry on.” And my best advice to people is to find what you like, and let it kill you.

Popmatters: Essential to life: coffee, vodka, cigarettes, chocolate, or … ?

Friedman: The essentials are Kona coffee, Cuban cigars, women. And, of course, bottled water. The last is a joke, yeah.

Popmatters: Environ of choice: city or country, and where on the map?

Friedman: Let’s go with Australia, definitely. Any place. I think that’s far enough away … (Australians) are great because they don’t have all the hangups Americans do. Not yet, anyway.

Popmatters: What do you want to say to the leader of your country?

Friedman: Stop this government by ego. And try to have some of the imagination and courage and generosity of spirit that Winston Churchill had. But that of course is impossible because I think you have to be born with those things.

Popmatters: Last but certainly not least, what are you working on now?

Friedman: I’m working on a secret project with Willie Nelson, and I’m working on a book with Billy Bob Thornton. And there’s a play called “Becoming Kinky: The World According to Kinky Friedman,” which was written and directed by Ted Swindley, who did “Always … Patsy Cline,” which was a huge hit. And I’ve seen this play, which features a young Kinky, a middle-aged Kinky and an older Kinky, and it’s very, very funny and wise and poignant. ’Course, I’m saying this, and I’m trying to be subjective. I had nothing to do with the play; I only saw the staged reading of it. But soon it should be coming to a theater near you. “Becoming Kinky” — if that thing hits, I think I’ll finally be able to resign from the human race.

Happy Birthday, Kinky Friedman

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Willie Nelson autographs guitar for Kinky Friedman Halloween party, with Pauline Reese (10/29/2010)

Saturday, October 16th, 2010

Willie Nelson has donated a personally signed guitar as the killer-bee door prize. In other words, for a mere 20 bucks, everyone has an even-steven chance at owning a guitar played and signed by a true Texas hero, in fact a legend.

First Annual Monsters Ball of Salado
hosted by Kinky Friedman with Pauline Reese
Friday, November 29, 2010
Salado Springs Music Hall
200 Royal Street, Salado, TX
www.oldsaladospringsmusichall.com
214-537-2943

SALADO, Texas — Yes, something wickedly fun and funny is coming to the Salado Springs Music Hall in downtown Salado, Texas on Friday, October 29. It’s the First Annual Monsters Ball of Salado, and none other than Kinky Friedman, Texas’ best-known author, songster, humorist and wicked political gadfly, will host. Joining Kinky on stage will be Texas Music Awards’ Entertainer of the Year, Pauline Reese.

Festivities, including a high dudgeon costume contest, a reading and brief performance from the Kinkster, and a sensational door prize, begin at 7 p.m. Ticket price is $20.00. Tickets can be purchased on-site at the Salado Springs Music Hall, through the website at www.oldsaladospringsmusichall.com or at 214-537-2943.

The Monsters Ball, a Halloween tradition throughout the world, will be the grand opening event at the brand-new Salado Springs Music Hall (200 Royal Street, Salado, TX), the area’s hottest new first-class restaurant and top-shelf bar. Sitting on fourteen acres on Salado Creek, the Music Hall is already considered the finest dance- and music-hall complex in Central Texas. No less than Jenna Bush held her wedding party on the property, which also includes an outdoor grotto, a B&B and a cigar bar. There will be a buffet with food service and a full bar at the Monsters Ball.
(more…)

“My Willie,” by Kinky Friedman

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

 

Backstage at any show has its similarities, whether it’s Broadway or the circus or the meanest little honky-tonk in Nacogdoches — the palpable sense of people out there somewhere in the darkness waiting for your performance, or being able to pull a curtain back slightly and experience the actual sight of the audience sitting there waiting to be entertained by someone who, in this case, happens to be you. Standing alone in the spotlight, up on the high wire without a net, is something Willie Nelson has had to deal with for most of his adult life.

One night at Billy Bob’s in Fort Worth, I was standing backstage in the near darkness when a voice right behind me almost caused me to drop my cigar into my Dr. Pepper. It was Willie, “Let me show you something,” he said, and he pulled a curtain back, revealing a cranked-up crowd beginning to get drunk, beginning to grow restless, and packed in tighter than smoked oysters in Hong Kong. Viewed from our hidden angle, they were a strangely intimidating sight, yet Willie took them in almost like a walk in the trailer park.

“That’s where the real show is,” he said.

“If that’s where the real show is,” I said, “I want my money back.”

“Do you realize,” Willie continued in a soft, soothing, serious voice, “That ninety-nine percent of those people are not with their true first choice?”

“Do you realize,” I said, “that you and I aren’t with our true first choice either?  I mean, a latent homosexual relationship is a nice thing to have going for us, but sooner or later…”

Willie wasn’t listening to my cocktail chatter.  He looked out at the crowd for a moment or two longer and then let the curtain drop from his hand, sending us back into twilight. “That’s why they play the jukebox,” he said.

Kinky Friedman
September 1997
Texas Monthly