Archive for the ‘Kris Kristofferson’ Category

Willie Nelson & Family with Kris Kristofferson (May 19, 2016)

Saturday, May 19th, 2018

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Willie Nelson featured in new Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s new exhibit, “Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ‘70s”

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

www.Tennesseean.com
by:  Juli Thanki

“Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s”
Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
(222 5th Ave. S)
Nashville

May 25, 2018 – Feb. 14, 2021. 

General admission tickets ($25.95 for adults, $23.95 for seniors and students, $22.95 for military personnel and $15.95 for youths 6-12 years old) can be purchased online at the museum box office or online at countrymusichalloffame.org. Admission is free for children five years old and younger and museum members.

Information about upcoming exhibit-related programs can be found on the museum website

On May 25, the museum will celebrate its newest exhibition with a sold-out concert in the museum’s CMA Theater. The super-sized lineup, led by musical directors Shooter Jennings and Dave Cobb, features Joe Ely, Jessi Colter, Bobby Bare, Billy Joe Shaver, Kimmie Rhodes and Delbert McClinton, Michael Martin Murphey, Gary P. Nunn, Tanya Tucker and Bobby Earl Smith, several of whom have artifacts in the exhibit. They’ll be joined by Jason Isbell, Jack Ingram, Ashley Monroe, Jamey Johnson, Amanda Shires, Jason Boland and Colter Wall, a new generation of musical renegades who, decades from now, might be featured in a museum display of their own.

One of the most vibrant and creative eras in country music history began with a fire at a pig farm.

In December 1970, the 400-acre spread in Ridgetop, Tenn., belonged to Willie Nelson, a singer and songwriter who had found more success as the latter than the former during the years he spent rattling around Nashville. After the blaze destroyed his house, Nelson returned to his native Texas.

The fire and Nelson’s relocation serve as the beginning of the story told in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s new exhibit, “Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ‘70s,” which opens Friday, May 25, and is scheduled to run until February 2021. The exhibit focuses on “Nashville and Austin, the blossoming of those music scenes, what was happening in each city and the interaction between them,” said exhibit co-curator Michael Gray.

Austin had a thriving creative scene, with artists and musicians making their mark all over town. There, Nelson grew his hair long, traded his turtlenecks for T-shirts and found a community of like-minded musicians. At venues like Armadillo World Headquarters and the Broken Spoke, audiences comprised equally of hippies and cowboys grooved to the progressive country sounds of Nelson, the Sir Douglas Quintet and Jerry Jeff Walker, to name just a few.

“In Nashville, there was a system for a lot of sessions where people like Nelson and Waylon Jennings would go into the studio with company producers and it was almost like they had to take a passenger seat in their own car,” said Peter Cooper, who co-curated the exhibit. “They weren’t able to make creative decisions about what musicians would and would not play on the records, or how the records would sound. They chafed at that.” When artists like Jennings, Nelson, Bobby Bare and Kris Kristofferson fought to gain creative control, Cooper added, it “opened up Nashville’s recording system in a really interesting way.”

While some previous depictions of Austin and Nashville have pitted the two music-heavy towns against one another, museum CEO Kyle Young describes the interaction as a “cultural exchange.”

“Tom T. Hall was coming down to Willie’s Fourth of July Picnic and taking his shirt off and saying how it was country music’s Woodstock. Waylon and Willie were in Nashville studios a lot, as were Michael Murphey and Kinky Friedman,” said Cooper. “It’s a little bit like what was happening at the Armadillo, where people that think they may not be on the same side of things wind up finding out they were playing for the same team.”

“Outlaws and Armadillos” features more film than any of the museum’s previous exhibit thanks to co-curator Eric Geadelmann, an Austin-based filmmaker who has spent the last several years working on a documentary about the outlaw movement. “Based on the narrative we’re telling, we ordered up eight short films (from Geadelmann), six to eight minutes each … These shorts are going to be a centerpiece of the exhibition,” said museum Young. The films include exclusive performance footage and interviews, some of which were conducted with artists, such as Guy Clark, who’ve since died.

That’s not the only thing that may surprise visitors.

Yes, there’s the usual museum fare: stage wear, awards and instruments galore. But there’s also the blade that inspired Clark’s masterpiece “The Randall Knife,” a set of Ringling Bros. coveralls worn by Joe Ely when he left music to join the circus, and a copper moonshine still — parts of it covered in the same green oxidization that blankets the Statue of Liberty — that was used by singer-songwriter Tom T. Hall and the Rev. Will D. Campbell, a self-described “bootleg preacher” and important figure of the Civil Rights Movement who also served as pastor to several country artists.

“Will Campbell was part of our family for years,” Hall told The Tennessean after Campbell’s death in 2013. “He married those who were in love, tried to reconcile those with hate, buried our dead and tolerated the rest of us.”

The exhibit isn’t limited to those who stood behind the microphone, either. Several gig posters designed by Texas artists like Jim Franklin and Micael Priest are featured. One glass case includes a windbreaker that belonged to Darrell Royal, the former University of Texas Longhorns football coach who’s credited with developing the wishbone offense and introducing Willie Nelson to harmonica player Mickey Raphael. Raphael has now been an integral part of Nelson’s Family band for over 40 years, and has a diamond-encrusted ring, which is also adorned with Nelson’s tiny, gold face, to prove it. (That ring? It’s in the exhibit, too.)

By the second half of the 1970s, the outlaw movement had captured the attention of the mainstream. However, “By the time ‘Wanted! The Outlaws’ (a compilation record featuring Jennings, Nelson, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser) comes out in ’76 and is the first certified platinum country record, our story’s almost over,” said Gray. “We’re talking about everything that leads up to the moment when (‘outlaw’) becomes a big marketing term.”

“Outlaws and Armadillos” begins with a pig farm fire, and concludes with artwork. Artist and songwriter Susanna Clark’s rendering of the Pleiades constellation will be on display. The painting was used on the front cover of “Stardust,” Nelson’s sophisticated and sentimental album of pop standards. The 1978 release of “Stardust,” along with two other events that year — Jennings’ arrest at a Nashville recording studio for possession of cocaine (charges were later dropped) and subsequent single, “Don’t You Think This Outlaw Bit’s Done Got Out of Hand” — marks the end of the exhibit.

Read rest of article here, see more pics and videos

Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, “Loving Her Was Easier”

Monday, May 7th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Kris Kristofferson, in concert (April 4, 2015)

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

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WILLIE NELSON, MERLE HAGGARD & KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
Sat Apr 4, 2015

WinStar World Casino and Resort

“Loving Her Was Easier (than anything I’ll ever do again)” — The Highwaymen (1992)

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

“This Land is Your Land” — Finale, Farm Aid 1987

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

“We close the show with Woody Guthrie’s love song to America.”
Farm Aid 1987

Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson honor Johnny Cash, “Forever/I Still Miss Someone”

Monday, March 26th, 2018
Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson recollect on the influence of Johnny Cash in a new video for the Cash project ‘Forever Words.’

It’s more than two decades since the Highwaymen regrouped for The Road Goes on Forever, the final album from the country supergroup. Even so, three of the band’s members – two living and one deceased – team up in a way on “Forever/I Still Miss Someone,” the kickoff track from next month’s Johnny Cash: Forever Words.

A uniquely collaborative album, Forever Words matches Cash’s elegiac poetry – much of which was discovered after his death in 2003 – with musical performances from his contemporaries, followers and family members. Opening the album is a moving performance from Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, both of whom collaborated with Cash throughout their careers. Led by Nelson’s acoustic guitar and Kristofferson’s narration, the song features an instrumental version of Cash’s 1958 single “I Still Miss Someone,” which is repurposed as the backdrop for the final poem the Man in Black ever wrote.

“My father, toward the end of his life… was dealing with the loss of my mother, and was very much alone,” says Cash’s son, John Carter Cash, who co-produced the record with Steve Berkowitz. “There was a folder of letters that my father had written for my mother, and within this folder, there were a few poems, many of them very sad. But right in the middle of them was this poem ‘Forever,’ that spoke of life continuing on. Even in the face of my father’s own mortality, he still saw the vision ahead for where his legacy would go.”

Honest and unflinching, “Forever/I Still Miss Someone” contrasts the finite nature of one’s life with the indestructibility of one’s art. “The songs that I sang will still be sung,” Kristofferson reads during the final moments of the video above, which takes a quick look at the song’s creation. The clip also finds Cash’s fellow Highwaymen talking candidly about their bandmate.

“He may be the most spiritual person I’ve known,” Kristofferson adds, “because he was conscious of his own mortality and his own weaknesses, but used his life to raise the perception of other people into the infinite.”

Johnny Cash: Forever Words, featuring contributions from Chris Cornell, Elvis Costello and others, will be released April 6th.

 

Concert for Our Lives Maui (March 24, 2018)

Monday, March 26th, 2018

On Saturday, March 24th, people all over the country made a stand to end gun violence in schools at March for our Lives events at over 30 locations nationwide. In Hawai’i artis joined students, musicians and local community members for ‘The Concert for Our Lives Maui’, a star-studded event in support of ending gun violence in schools at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center.   Performances included Willie Nelson, Jack Johnson, Kriistofferson, Mick Fleetwood, Steven Tyler , Landon McNamara, Lily Meola.

The Highwaymen, “Me and Bobby McGee”

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

“Concert for Our Lives” in support of common sense gun laws, with Willie Nelson, Jack Johnson, Kris Kristofferson, Landon McNammara, Willie K, Lily Meola (March 24, 2018)

Sunday, March 11th, 2018

As if living on Maui wasn’t great enough — here’s news of a free event on March 24th at Maui Arts & Cultural Center for Students (must have Eventbrite ticket).  Only $10  for the General Public Concert for Our Lives with Willie Nelson Jack Johnson Kris Kristofferson Landon McNamaraWillie K. Lily Meola and more…

Coming together with Students of Maui to #standwithparkland in support of common sense gun laws #neveragain We will be giving away a signed Tony Hawk skateboard, Surfboards and lot’s of stuff from RVCA Outerknown Sanuk Mizu Life THE LUCKY HONEY ALOHA Collection KIPA BEACH please go to Eventbrite for important information https://www.eventbrite.com/e/concert-for-our-lives-tickets-… \

“Big River” — The Highwaymen

Sunday, March 11th, 2018

“I’ve Always Been Crazy” — The Highwaymen, Farm Aid 1993

Monday, March 5th, 2018

The Highwaymen perform “I’ve Always Been Crazy” at Farm Aid VI in Ames, Iowa on April 24, 1993.

Farm Aid was started by Willie Nelson, Neil Young and John Mellencamp in 1985 to keep family farmers on the land and has worked since then to make sure everyone has access to good food from family farmers. Dave Matthews joined Farm Aid’s board of directors in 2001.

For more information about Farm Aid, visit: http://farmaid.org/youtube

Farm Aid’s performances are donated by the artists in order to raise funds and raise awareness for family farmers. They’ve raised their voices to help — what can you do?

www.FarmAid.org

Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson

Friday, February 23rd, 2018

The Highwaymen

Friday, February 16th, 2018

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This day in Willie Nelson History: “The Last Days of Frank & Jesse James” (2/16/1986)

Friday, February 16th, 2018

This 1986 movie looks at the last years of famous outlaws, Frank and Jesse James. The film opens in 1877 with the brothers trying to settle down after 15 years of thievery. Frank (Johnny Cash) is shown to be a book-loving and family-oriented man, while brother Jesse (Kris Kristofferson) is a money-hungry womanizer. The movie follows their lives through Jesse’s death at the hands of the “rotten little coward” Bob Ford (Darrell Wilks) and Frank’s death in 1892. Willie Nelson also makes an appearance as a former member of the James gang.

On February 16, 1986, the NBC-TV movie “The Last Days of Frank & Jesse James” aired, staring Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Ed Bruce, David Allan Coe and June Carter Cash.