Archive for the ‘marijuana, NORML, hemp’ Category

New Nathaniel Rateliff strains for Willies Reserve

Monday, May 11th, 2020

Willie Nelson defines American Music

Tuesday, April 21st, 2020

photo: Robert Mora/Getty Images

www.cmt.com/news
by: Edward Norris

Willie Nelson grew to greatness while country music was also maturing as a distinct art form. He was born in 1933, a month before Jimmie Rodgers, the Father of Country Music died, and the same year Bob Wills formed the Texas Playboys. Nelson’s arrival into the world came a decade before the Carter Family disbanded and Ernest Tubb joined the Grand Ole Opry.

Born in Abbott, Texas and raised by his paternal grandparents, Nelson was learning the guitar and writing songs before he reached his teens. He would go on to become one of the most recorded and recognizable figures in the history of American music, regardless of genre. Along the way he would record 70 studio albums, 33 live albums, 25 albums with other artists, and soundtracks for movies he appeared or starred in. The number of singles he’s done for and with other artists are beyond counting.

Between 1962, when he charted his first single, and 2000, by which time his chart appearances as a singles artist had become rare, Nelson charted 117 songs.

Here’s a quick look at the Old Master’s contributions, honors and impacts during eight decades.

The 1950s

Nelson plays in local bands, books artists, promotes shows, and works as a DJ at stations in Texas and Vancouver, Washington. In 1957, he releases “No Place for Me,” his first self-written, self-recorded and self-promoted single. It’s issued under the Willie Nelson Records label. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1960s

In 1960, Nelson moves to Nashville and signs his first publishing deal. He begins getting major cuts from prominent country artists. Faron Young has a No. 1 in 1961 with “Hello Walls.” Billy Walker takes “Funny How Time Slips Away” to No. 23 the same year. Patsy Cline rings up a No. 2 with “Crazy,” also in 1961.

Nelson signs with Liberty Records in 1962 and proceeds to have a Top 10 that year with “Willingly,” a song recorded with his future wife, Shirley Collie. He does even better with his next single, “Touch Me,” his own composition, which rises to No. 7. That will be his biggest chart success as a recording act for the rest of the decade. But he has accumulated enough stature to join the Grand Ole Opry in 1964. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1970s

This is the decade that Nelson develops into full bloom. Chastened by his lack of success as a recording artist in Nashville, Nelson moves back to Texas, where he gradually evolves from the clean-cut, turtle-neck wearing dandy into the hippie persona he will inhabit for the rest of his life.

He stages the first of his cross-cultural music festivals July 4, 1973, in Dripping Springs, Texas. In 1975, he releases his bare bones concept album, Red Headed Stranger (which producer Billy Sherrill described as sounding like “a bad demo”). It becomes a big hit and yields Nelson — by now 44 years old — his first No. 1 single, “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.” The landmark song also nets him his first Grammy. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
The next year, RCA, Nelson’s former label, assembles an album of formerly unreleased tracks by Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jennings’ wife Jessi Colter, and Tompall Glaser of the Glaser Brothers. It’s titled Wanted! The Outlaws and launches the “outlaw” movement.

With future classics like “Good Hearted Woman,” it not only romanticizes Waylon & Willie, but inspires other artists to exert more control over the music they record, including writing or choosing the songs and, often, recording with their own bands rather than with studio musicians. The project becomes country’s first platinum album. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
Nelson turns out six more No. 1s during the 1970s, two of them with Jennings. In 1978, with his recording success to give him leverage, Nelson records an entire album of pop songs he’d loved in his youth — Stardust. It, too, becomes a bestseller and stays on the country chart for 10 years!

Nelson becomes something of a movie star in 1979 via his supporting role in the Robert Redford-Jane Fonda film, The Electric Horseman. By the end of the decade, he has a total of three Grammys on his shelf, all for his vocal performances. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1980s

This might be described as the “Willie & Me” decade because it’s bursting with duet efforts. During it, he records albums with Ray Price, Roger Miller, Webb Pierce, Waylon Jennings (2), Merle Haggard (2), Kris Kristofferson, Faron Young and Hank Snow.

Then there are his collaborative No. 1 hits: “Just to Satisfy You” (with Jennings), “Pancho and Lefty” (Haggard), “To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before” (Julio Iglesias), “Seven Spanish Angels” (Ray Charles), “Highwayman” (Jennings, Kristofferson, Johnny Cash) and “Mind Your Own Business” (Hank Williams Jr., Reba McEntire, Tom Petty, Reverend Ike). Embedded from www.youtube.com.
May of his own solo hits during this era are now considered classics: “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys,” “On the Road Again,” “Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground,” and “Always on My Mind,” to name a few.

Concerned about the number of American family farms going into bankruptcy, Nelson co-founds Farm Aid in 1985. Except for two years, it has been held annually ever since, always with Nelson co-headlining it. Nelson also acts in several movies during the 1980s, notably Honeysuckle Rose (1980), Barbarossa (1982), The Songwriter (1984) and Red Headed Stranger (1987). He adds three more Grammys to his collection, including the President’s Merit Award in 1986. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1990s

Talk about emotional extremes! Discovering that his accountants have failed to pay his taxes, Nelson begins the ’90s deep in debt and stripped of most of his assets. With typical resourcefulness, he sits down with just his guitar and records the ironically titled 1991 album The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories? It doesn’t settle his debt, but it helps, and it nets him tons of useful publicity.

Then, only two years later, he’s inducted the Country Music Hall of Fame. Among the 14 studio albums he turns out during this decade are two with his piano-playing sister, Bobbie Nelson: the gospel collection How Great Thou Art and Hill Country Christmas. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
His choice of material ranges from Paul Simon’s “Graceland” on 1992’s Across the Borderline to his own self-written, self-produced tracks on 1996’s Spirit. In 1999, he turns to producer Daniel Lanois to create the more musically adventurous collection, Teatro, with Emmylou Harris guesting. It features several of Nelson’s earlier but less known compositions.


The 2000s

Nelson begins the new century receiving a lifetime achievement Grammy, then collects another Grammy for “Mendocino County Line,” a duet with Lee Ann Womack. In 2003, he and Ray Price release the album Run That By Me One More Time. The same year, he joins admirer Toby Keith for the single “Beer For My Horses,” which promptly gallops into No. 1. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
SiriusXM rebrands its classic country station in 2006 from Hank’s Place to Willie’s Place (and, in 2011, Willie’s Roadhouse). Nelson, Price and Merle Haggard return to the studio to record the poignant 2007 collection Last of the Breed, with its pensive track “Lost Highway” winning a Grammy.

In 2009, Nelson tips his hat to fellow Texan and Hall of Fame songwriter with the tribute album You Don’t Know Me: The Songs of Cindy Walker. In a more lively turn, he teams up in 2009 with the western swing band Asleep at the Wheel to pump out Willie and the Wheel. As he periodically does, he returns to the Great American Songbook for his final album of the decade, American Classics. It features guest appearances by Norah Jones and Diana Krall. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
The 2010s

Nelson continues to try his hand with new producers and new backup musicians in 2010 when he pairs with T. Bone Burnett for the album Country Music. (Burnett had worked his career-revivalist wonders earlier in the decade with Ralph Stanley.) The album digs deep in the traditional country repertoire to spotlight such great perennials as “Dark as a Dungeon,” “Freight Train Boogie,” “House of Gold” and “I Am a Pilgrim.”

Nelson reunites with Merle Haggard in 2015 for Django & Jimmie, a loving tribute to Nelson’s idol, the gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt and Haggard’s chief inspiration, Jimmie Rodgers. Haggard dies the following year. Two albums earn Nelson best traditional pop vocal Grammys: Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin (2016) and My Way (2018), his hat-doffing to the songs of Frank Sinatra. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 2020s

Earlier this year, Nelson won his 10th career Grammy Award for the title track of his 2019 album, Ride Me Back Home, in the category of best country solo performance. He promises his 70th studio album for July 2020, First Rose of Spring. It rings out with such eternals as “I’ll Break Out Again Tonight,” “Just Bummin’ Around,” “I’m the Only Hell My Mama Ever Raised” and “Yesterday When I Was Young.”

Willie Nelson IS American music — and he’s got the records to prove it.

Willie Nelson interview on hemp

Sunday, March 1st, 2020

“I’m not smoking any more but I’m not smoking any less” — Willie Nelson

Saturday, February 8th, 2020

Willie Nelson honored with the Willie Nelson award at 2018 Emerald Cup (12/16/18)

Monday, December 16th, 2019

www.leafly.com
by:  David Downs

You know the old cliché: “Everyone who entered is a winner.”

But that was the stone cold truth last weekend north of San Francisco at the 15th annual Emerald Cup cannabis competition, expo, and smoke-out.

Every single entrant in the massive contest survived the test of California adult use cannabis legalization and implementation. It was a year where more than half of the pre-existing medical cannabis industry got wiped out by local regulations. Three-quarters of the cities in the state have banned legal cannabis activity.

“We have gone through quite a whirlwind,” said Carter Lash, founder of award-winning topical maker C.A.D. “But we’re happy to be here. It’s a big change for everyone and we’re trying to stay positive. A lot of people weren’t able to be here.”

Multi-generational farmers as well as industry newbies traded war stories and harvest buds with thrilled attendees Saturday and Sunday.

An award ceremony Sunday afternoon doled out trophies to the best California cannabis products in 24 categories. Willie Nelson popped in for a lifetime achievement award and director Kevin Smith busted up the crowd with a NSFW podcast taping.


Willie Nelson holds up his award, a custom Bluegrass “lamp” bubbler. Cup organizer Tim Blake has been trying to book Willie for years. (David Downs/Leafly)

Willie Nelson, Nathanial Rateliff team with cannabis line #WilliesReserve

Sunday, December 15th, 2019

photo: Janis Tillerson

theknow.denverpost.com

Singer-songwriter Willie Nelson and Denver’s own Nathaniel Rateliff have teamed up to promote a new line of cannabis products ahead of Rateliff’s annual holiday concerts, cannabis PR agency Grasslands said this week.

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The new strain of cannabis flower is part of Willie’s Reserve: The Nightstache Collection, which also includes a vaping cartridge that launched in August just before Rateliff’s annual Red Rocks concerts. The strain is “hand-selected from local grower AJ’s Craft Cannabis,” according to Grasslands, and was made available starting Dec. 11 to promote Rateliff and his band The Night Sweats’ Dec. 13-14 concerts at Mission Ballroom. 

williesreserve.com

“I’m not smoking anymore, but I’m not smoking any less either.” — Willie Nelson

Saturday, December 7th, 2019

Willie squashes the rumors.

Willie says no to tobacco

Wednesday, December 4th, 2019
 
www.People.com
By:  Julie Mazziotta

Willie Nelson told a Texas TV station that he no longer smokes, sparking speculation that he stopped smoking marijuana.

Nelson’s publicist Elaine Schock tells PEOPLE he does indeed “still taste the flower.”  “Willie doesn’t smoke any more or any less [weed],” Schock says.

Schock confirmed that he no longer smokes cigarettes, clarifying what Nelson told KSAT in San Antonio on Monday.

“I don’t smoke anymore. I take better care of myself,” the 86-year-old country music legend said.

Over the summer, he had to cancel his tour due to a “breathing problem.”

“I have abused my lungs quite a bit in the past, so breathing is a little more difficult these days and I have to be careful,” he said. “I’ve mistreated my lungs since I was [young]. I started smoking cedar bark, went from that to cigarettes to whatever. And that almost killed me.”

But Nelson is still very much alive, even if rumors started circulating that he was near death after he had to cancel his shows.
“I don’t give a s—,” about the rumors, Nelson said. “I’m here, I’m glad to be here. I’m lucky to be here.”

And continuing to tour is actually helping him, Nelson said.
“Singing out there for an hour is a good workout,” he said. “Your lungs are the biggest muscle you’ve got. So when you’re out there working, you are working out.”

Nelson is a well-documented fan of weed, and even has his own curated line of marijuana called Willie’s Reserve.

“I feel like I bought so much, it’s time to start selling it back!” he said in 2015.

He even convinced Woody Harrelson to start smoking pot again after the actor took a 2-year break.

“He was never comfortable with me quitting, it just bothered him,” Harrelson said in May 2018. “I would always say, ‘Willie you know I’m not smoking,’ He would always do the same thing like he was hearing it for the first time, ‘Oh really? Sorry!’ This happened like 500 times.”

But after a poker game, Nelson got Harrelson to smoke up.

“I was in a celebratory mood and he hands me that pin and I was just snatched and it was like ‘ah, f— it,’ ” Harrelson said. “I take a big draw of it and he says ‘Welcome home, son.’ ”

Willie’s Reserve partners with Nathaniel Rateliff, on “Nightstache” cannabis

Tuesday, August 27th, 2019
photo: Janis Tillerson

www.DenverPost.com
by: John Wenzel

Willie’s Reserve, the Denver-based cannabis brand from singer-songwriter Willie Nelson, recently unveiled its first partnership with a Colorado musician.

Soul-revival band Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats has lent its name to a line of Willie’s Reserve vape pens made with “a high-quality strain of cannabis, known as Cherry AK.” The 500-milligram distillate cartridges are available at eight LivWell shops in Denver, Garden City and Fort Collins, according to Willie’s Reserve.

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“(Willie) met the guys at Farm Aid 2016, which was their first year playing that event, and that day was all a conversation about agriculture. And nothing has energized agriculture in America like the legalization of cannabis,” said Elizabeth Hogan, a co-founder of GCH Inc., the company that owns and runs the Willie’s Reserve and Willie’s Remedy brands. “Ever since then, we’ve talked about what it means, and they’ve expressed interest along the way in doing this.”

Willie’s Reserve was looking to partner with a band making an impact with both its music and its advocacy, Hogan said. Rateliff’s act — which rose to national prominence in 2015 with the upbeat single “S.O.B.” — fit that bill, thanks in part to The Marigold Project, a nonprofit Rateliff founded to work for social and economic justice.

“We are such fans of what those guys are doing in the world,” Hogan said. “It’s impressive that this band on the big rise is taking the time and effort to have those conversations.”

The timing of the Cherry AK cartridge debut is no accident, either. Having released a pair of studio albums and a live album from Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Rateliff and his band also opened for The Rolling Stones at Broncos Stadium at Mile High on Aug. 10 and have an already sold-out two-night headlining stint at Red Rocks on Aug. 21 and 22. Harnessing the publicity surrounding those events helps not only potential Colorado sales but also sales in future markets.

“They’re excited to launch their project in Colorado because it’s their home, but the intention is to bring this collection to other states,” Hogan said.

Colorado is currently the No. 1 market for Willie’s Reserve products. Since launching in August 2016, more than 1.2 million Willie’s Reserve Ready Roll joints have been sold here, and the brand is currently available in about 180 shops statewide, according to the company. Moreover, the volume of Willie’s Reserve vape products sold in Colorado has grown 120 percent year-over-year, the company said, although it declined to share revenue numbers.

“Our best-moving items are half-gram vape cartridges and eighths of packaged flower, but ready-rolls have been really, really popular, and we’re bringing new edibles pretty soon,” Hogan said.

Willie Nelson Busted at 61 (Star Magazine May 24, 1994)

Friday, May 24th, 2019

Star Magazine
by Alex Burton
May 24, 1994

Willie Nelson was arrested in Hewitt, Texas, on May 10, after police found him asleep in the back of his Mercedes and discovered a bag of marijuana in his car.

Nelson, 61, claims he was returning home after a poker game when he pulled off the road due to bad weather.

“I played all night and was driving back to Austin,” says Nelson.  It was foggy, so I pulled to the side of the road to sleep, and the policemen found me.”

A Hewitt police report says officers “saw a man lying in the back seat who appeared to be asleep.  While looking in the vehicle, officers observed a hand-rolled cigarrette in the ashtray.”

“The officers tapped on the window.  The subject sat up, opened the door and identified himself as Willie Nelson.”

The report adds, “The officers believed the cigarette in the ashtray to be marijuana, and Mr. Nelson was placed under arrest for possession of marijuana under 2 ounces.”

“Mr. Nelson advised the officers there was additional marijuana in the vehicle.  A bag was found which contained a substance believed to be marijuana.”

Nelson was taken to the McLennan County Jail in Waco and held for two hours before posting bail.

“Mr. Nelson was turned over to the booking officers there.  Standard procedure is to fingerprint and photograph the individual and collect the person’s property,” says Hewitt Police Lt. Wilbert Wachtendorf.

“After his release, he returned to the station here in Hewitt, and retrieved his car, credit cards and cash.

“I was in the station when Mr. Nelson returned.  He actually shook the hands of the two arresting officers.  He was in good spirits, and seemed to be a nice individual.”

The charge against Nelsion is a Class B misdemeanor and the case will be referred to the local district attorney.

Willie Nelson featured in hemp pop-up book

Saturday, April 20th, 2019

It’s 2019, and cannabis is finally becoming accepted as a recreational activity worthy of one of the fastest growing business industries in the country. With more states legalizing the medical and recreational use of weed, filmmakers, musicians, agriculturalists, entrepreneurs, and even artists are using their skills to pay tribute to the world’s most wonderful plant.

With this year’s 4/20 holiday quickly approaching, it’s okay to take some time out of the day to think of what kind of gifts one might want to give their cannabis-loving roommate or co-worker. One gift that stands out–or pops out, one could say–from the rest, is Dimensional Cannabis: The Pop Up Book of Marijuana, the world’s first cannabis pop up book.

The art featured in the book was designed by renowned illustrator, graffiti writer, and tattoo artist, Mike Giant, and covers various aspects of cannabis culture. Dimensional Cannabis was produced by Poposition Press, an independent press company which designs, publishes, and distributes unique limited edition pop up books which are created in collaboration with contemporary artists.

Readers will notice in the video below that there’s an entire pop-up page dedicated to some of the more well-known figures who have stood as champions for the cannabis cause, including Jerry Garcia, Snoop Dogg, Willie Nelson, Jimi Hendrix, and many more.

Avid readers and cannabis connoisseurs alike will have the option to purchase three different editions of the book. There’s the $42 Standard Edition, which includes a complimentary 2? Dimensional Cannabis pin; the $240 Collector’s Edition, which comes in a gold foil case wrap along with a mix of enamel pins, four-pack of stickers, art print on hemp paper; and finally the $420 Connoisseur Edition, featuring a wooden laser etched slipcase, pins, stickers, multiple works of art on hemp paper, an etched joint case, and more. The estimated delivery date for all three editions of the book is fall 2019.

Pre-order options and more information on Dimensional Cannabis can be found here.

Happy 420

Saturday, April 20th, 2019

Willie Nelson Quits Weed

Monday, April 1st, 2019

Willie Nelson lauches CBD Coffee

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

Willie Nelson launches CBD infused cofffee

Wednesday, February 6th, 2019