Archive for the ‘marijuana, NORML, hemp’ Category

Willie on Weed (High Times, October 2005)

Sunday, July 4th, 2021

Willie on Weed
High Times Magazine
October 2005
by Richard Cusick

When it comes to grass, Willie’s fans divide into three distinct camps:  stoners like myself who view Willie Nelson as a sterling example of humanity; politically conservative country folks who dislike the pot thing but cry in their beers whenever he sings “Crazy”; and finally, fans who don’t smoke and don’t care, but remain mildly amused by Shotgun Willie’s outlaw ways.  So, unlike most marijuana activists, Nelson doesn’t preach merely to the converted.  Arguably, on the strength of his art and his living example, he’s helped change more minds about marijuana than any other American.

“They’re watching me,” Nelson acknowledges.  “I’m like the canary in the coal mine.  As long as I can remember the words to my songs and do a good show, they say:  “Well, it may not be affecting them so much.”

And so, despite incessant interview request, HIGH TIMES has always been treated like a red-headed stranger by the managers, press agents, record companies, road managers and assorted family members who get paid to look out for Willie Nelson’s best interests.  Frankly, I don’t think the man himself gave a shit one way or the other.  We were all waiting for the right moment to make it happen.  The release of Willie’s long-delayed reggae CD, Countryman, turned out to be the right moment.  One look at the cover art proved that.  There are actually two covers:  “One for Wal-Mart,” Willie noted, and one for every fan of the singer’s favorite plant — with a big pot leaf commanding the center.

It’s the hottest day of the year.  The temperature on the field of Prince Geroge’s Stadium in Bowie, MD, reaches triple digits, but the Bob Dylan – Willie Nelson show has attracted a particular rugged type of music fan willing to roast for hours in the sun to secure a good seat on the general admission lawn.  I’m scheduled to meet with the American music legend for an hour and a half, but a family member’s illness delays Willie by nearly an hour.  How to stuff 30 years worth of interview into 30 minutes?  My strategy involves breaking the ice by bringing the musician’s old friend Keith Stroup, founder of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, and Allen St. Pierre, NORML’s executive director, along for the ride.  Willie has been a member of NORML’s advisory board for 22 years, and so I assumed their reputations would precede me…

The familiar sound of his guitar floats softly from a state-of-the-art sound system shelved above our heads on board one of the world’s most widely travelled and legendary tour buses.  A copy of Bob Dylan’s autobiography sits on the soft brown-leather couch in the front, while Willie holds court from a corner booth.  We will talk for the next 40 minutes without interruption — save for one very unusualy exception.

HT:  You’ve done reggae songs before, but Countryman is your first full-blown reggae album.  How did that happen?

WN:  Ten years ago, I went to see Chris Blackwell when he was the head of Island Records in Jamaica, and we talked about putting out a reggae album, Chris loved the idea, but I also played him a CD I produced called Spirit, and he said, “I love Spirit.  Let’s put that out now and y’all go finish the reggae and then we’ll put it out.”

But they had a shakeup, and he left the label.  So for 10 years it kinda laid there, until the good folks after at Lost Highway picked it up and ran with it.

Keith Stroup:  Does the title Countryman refer to the ganja growers up in the mountians?

WN:  Yeah.  That’s right.

HT:  I’ve always thought reggae and country gospel are very similar, not in sound so much as in spirit.

WN:  The way the musicians tell me, reggae took off – Peter Tosh, Toots and those guys — was that reggae came basically from country music, from listening to the radio in the United States and hearing WSM play ’em some Grand Old Opry.  When they told me that, I started thinking about how country songs just naturally lend themselves to a reggae rhythm.

HT:  Does marijuana help your songwriting?

WN:  I wrote most of my good songs before I ever heard of marijuana or used it, and I’m not sure that it doesn’t slow down your writing.

HT:  Really?

WN:  Well, if you’re hungry or on edge and you’re writing, you could always just sit down and smoke a little joint and not worry about it.  But some things you need to worry about.

HT:  So taking that edge off sometimes isn’t a good thing.

WN:  Yeah.  You need that age.

(Bob Dylan quielty enters the front of the bus — Yes, really.)

WN:  Hey! Bob! (rising from booth)  C’mere.  (A brief hug and Willie returns to the corner booth.)Â

Bob Dylan:  They gotcha trapped.

HT:  We got him now.

BD:  I’ll come back.

WN:  All right.

(exit Bob Dylan)

HT:  You know, I named my daughter after than man!

WN:  You did?

HT:  We figured the name works for either a boy or a girl.

WN:  Yeah, that’s true.  Well, he’s a good guy.  Believe it or not, that’s the first time I’ve seen him this tour.  We’ve been out two weeks.  He was gonna play some chess.  He asked me if I want to play some chess, so we can do it tomorrow or the next day.

HT:  I believe we were talking about songwriting.

WN:  I started writing songs a long time before I started smoking.  Well, I started smoking cigarettes when I was 4.  I started smoking something when I was 4.  Cedar bark, Grapevines, Cotton leaves, Coffee leaves.  I even tried Black Drop one time.

HT:  Black Drop?

WN:  It was an old laxative in powder form.  Cedar bark, I smoked that.  And then I used to raise hens, so I would trade a dozen eggs for a pack of cigarettes back in those days.  About 18 cents, I think.  About 18 or 20 cents for a pack of cigarettes.  Lucky Strikes.  Camels.

HT:  In your autobiography, you said that marijuana got you off cigarettes and drinking.

WN:  Yeah.  I knew I was killing myself with cigarettes, and I knew I was really putting myself in danger with drinking so much, so somewhere along the way I decided.  “Wait a minute!  You know, do what you can do.”  In the early years, I drank all the time.  Mainly before pot.  Up until then, I was into whiskey and uppers.  You know, that’s the deal.  Truck drivers had the bennies when they made those LA turnaounds, and all that stuff was going around.  All the guitar players had it.

HT:  Fred Lockwood.  He was the first guy to ever turn you on to pot?

WN:  Yeah. A Fort Worth musician.  That’s right.

HT:  Fred Lockwood was not only the first person to give you a joint, as I understand it, he’s always the guy who gave you the line.  “I Gotta Get Drunk and I Sure do Regret It.”

WN:  There was two.  There was Fred Lockwood and there was Ace Lockwood.  They were brothers.  Fred was the one who gave me the line, “I Gotta Get Drunk and I sure Do Regret It” and his brother Ace went and gave me a itty bitty little snuff can full of pot one time.

HT:  So that was your first ime around the block?

WN:  I played a club there, and we played together.  These guys were musicians, so we went over to their house, and Fred and I were playing dominoes.  That was the first time I ever smoked it.  I think I smoked it about six months before I ever got high.  And then, all of a sudden:  “Oh yeah –that’s what that is.”

HT:  Willie, you’re a musician known for making political stands.  Not every musician does that.

WN:  I’ve let my beliefs be known and they turned out to be political.  I didn’t start out taking any political stands — just taking stands.

HT:  You just think a certain way and…

KS…groups like NORML start using you politically.

HT:  You’ve also been out front about your use of cannabis for a long time.  Have you taken a lot of flak for it over your career.

WN:  Zero that I know of.

HT:  It’s amazing how you get buy.

WN:  Well, I got busted.

HT:  750,000 people got busted for marijuana last year.

KS:  Yeah, but none of them got busted because they slept on the side of the highway and then raised the “hand-rolled cigarette defense.” Which I don’t believe has worked for anybody else — wasn’t that it?

WN:  You can’t assume that a rolled-up cigarette in an ashtray, looking through the window, is a marijuana cigarette.

KS:  In Texas, in particular!  I think of that as the Willie Nelson Defense.

WN:  I thought it was brilliant.

KS:  I did, too.

HT:  I hope you don’t mind my blazing, but I’m about to see Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan play.

WN:  You’ve gotta get there.

HT:  Well, I know you recommend moderation.

WN:  Moderation is always the key, even for pot.  You can over-do pot.  And it’s not for the kids… After they get 18, 21 years old, they’re going to try whatever they’re gonna try…

HT:  What’s the difference smoking pot 50 years ago and now?

WN:  It costs more money.

HT:  People say it’s better now, but I don’t remember not getting high 25 years ago.

WN:  No, I don’t either.  You know, it’s kind of like sex — there’s none bad, but there’s just some that’s better.  I think our tolerance is pretty good, too.

HT:  I ususlaly stop for a month every year or so.

KS:  I usualy stop for a few days every now and then — because I run out.

WN:  I intentionally let myself run out every now and then.

KS:  A couple of days into that, I usually say, “Let me rethink that decision.”

WN:  Either that or one of the guys’ll bring me one and say, “Here, don’t you think it’s time?

Willie’s Reserve

Saturday, July 3rd, 2021

Willie quashes rumors

Monday, June 7th, 2021

“I’m not smoking anymore, but I’m not smoking any less either.” — Willie Nelson

Saturday, December 7th, 2019

Willie Nelson’s cannabis conference

Sunday, May 2nd, 2021

www.austin360.com
by: Deborah Sengupta Stith

On Willie Nelson’s 88th birthday and the final day of his inaugural cannabis conference, the Texas Senate began work on a House-passed bill allowing holstered handguns to be carried in public without a state-issued permit.  

The country music legend reflected on the development with wry humor during his keynote interview on April 29.

“I just saw where in Texas now, it’s going to be legal to carry a gun around openly. I said, ‘Well, at least now let us light up a joint so we won’t be armed and dangerous,’” Nelson quipped. 

Nelson’s remarks during Luck Summit: Planting the Seed came at the end of a virtual birthday bash that recapped highlights from three days of panels, musical performances, sketch comedy and more. The closing event was an even mix of entertainment and call-to-action.

read article here

Luck Summit

Monday, April 26th, 2021

Willie Nelson’s Team Luck works to make 4/20 National Holiday

Friday, April 23rd, 2021
Willie Nelson organization petitions Biden to make April 20 a national holiday

© Getty Images

www.TheHill.com

Country music legend Willie Nelson’s organization, Luck Reunion, has started a petition for President Biden to make April 20 through April 29 a national holiday for marijuana.

“The fine people of Luck, Texas, and supporters of the great Willie Nelson, on behalf of cannabis users around the nation, are writing today to ask you to consider declaring the 9 days spanning April 20 to April 29 an official national holiday: the ‘High Holidays,’” the petition states

The petition was started by Luck Reunion and has over 2,200 signatures. The goal is to get 2,500 signatures. 

The holiday would end on April 29 in honor of Nelson’s birthday.

The real purpose, the group says, of the request is to educate people about marijuana and attempt to de-stigmatize it.

“We believe that recognition of the ‘High Holidays’ opens the door to much needed dialogue supporting the many benefits of cannabis while helping to remove the unjustified stigmas currently surrounding this amazing plant,” the petition says.

The petition comes before Luck Reunion hosts their first annual cannabis convention called “Planting the Seed.”

“Please puff, puff, and pass this to your friends in Congress for consideration,” the petition says.

Nelson has been an advocate for marijuana and education around the topic for much of his musical career.

Line up announced for Luck’s Marijuana Summit (4/26 – 4/29, 2021)

Wednesday, April 21st, 2021

www.Luck

Luck Presents is proud to announce the lineup for their first annual cannabis convention, Luck Summit: Planting the Seed, which benefits HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project.

Presented by Rocket Seeds and hosted by Nathaniel Rateliff, the multi-day virtual summit seeks to destigmatize, educate, and promote cannabis culture in an informative and entertaining way. During the summit, which runs virtually April 26-29, Luck and fellow cannabis-advocate partners will showcase the cannabis plant through the lenses of history, science, entertainment, and culture. 

Matt Bizer, co-founder of Luck Presents, says of the programming, “It was important to us in this first year event that we created a bi-partisan, stigma free conversation around cannabis in its many forms. We truly believe that Willie has been a unifier for so many in his years as both a cannabis activist and humanitarian. With Willie as our landlord we are able to set a stage and a platform for this conversation in a unique way here in Texas and throughout the country.” 

Today, team Luck unveiled a highly curated lineup that is both entertainingly enlightening and recreationally educational, a sample of which is listed below. 

To register or view the full summit schedule, please click here

Planting the Seed will feature something for everyone—from the cannabis curious to the long-time 420-friendly—on all aspects of the cannabis plant: economics, logistics, agriculture, legalities, legislative approaches, culture, and revenue streams.

A sample of panel topics and speakers is listed below:
Texas State Agricultural Commissioner Sid Miller on Hemp for Texas, a conversation with Lisa Pittman (Zuber Lawler, LLP) and Sid Miller (Commissioner).

Beto O’Rouke: An Argument for Ending the Prohibition of Marijuana, a discussion with former Congressman O’Rouke and Shawn Hauser (Partner, Vicente Sederberg LLP).

Diversity & Equity in the Cannabis Culture.A fact-based national panel of experts discussing the real numbers of representation in cannabis. This panel will dive into how diverse representation—or lack thereof—impacts the emerging cannabis market. 
Moderator: Gaynell Rogers (Treehouse Global Ventures)Panelists: Opehlia Chong (Consultant), Dr. Janice M Vaghn Knox, Khadijah Adams (Girl Get That Money) 

Cannabinoids 101: Delta 9 THC vs CBD. What’s a cannabinoid and will it get me high?Whether you’re a lifelong fan of cannabis or you’re just dipping your toe into the CBD craze, in this discussion we’ll dive into what actually is a cannabinoid (there are over 160 of them!) and how these different cannabinoids can work in YOUR BODY. From the more popular Delta 9 THC and CBD cannabinoids to newer cannabinoids like Delta 8 THC and CBG, our expert panel is here to touch on all of them, and leave you with a better understanding of how and what to consume to best help your specific needs. Knowledge is power, and cannabis is powerful, so knowing what cannabinoids do will help guide you towards the best experience with this plant.

Moderator: Shayda Torabi (RESTART CBD)Panelists: Franny Tacy (Franny’s Farmacy), Jocelyn Sheltraw (headset.io), Leah Lakstins (Higher Ed Hemp Tours) 

Indica, Sativa, Hybrid: Terpenes: How to control your effects.

Whether you’re a lifelong fan of cannabis or you’re just dipping your toe into the CBD craze, in this discussion we’ll dive into what actually is a cannabinoid (there are over 160 of them!) and how these different cannabinoids can work in YOUR BODY. From the more popular Delta 9 THC and CBD cannabinoids to newer cannabinoids like Delta 8 THC and CBG, our expert panel is here to touch on all of them, and leave you with a better understanding of how and what to consume to best help your specific needs. Knowledge is power, and cannabis is powerful, so knowing what cannabinoids do will help guide you towards the best experience with this plant.

Moderator: Shayda Torabi (RESTART CBD)Panelists: Andrew Marlatt (Pharmlabs Texas), Rachelle Gordon (Cannabis writer), Anita Sommers (M(ASCP), CBD Genie, Cannabis Science Communicator)

Where’s The Money? Access to Capital, Opportunities for Investment.

An experienced panel of fund managers and active investors discuss opportunities, resources and reality checks. For entrepreneurs and investors, this panel promises to provide helpful insights for navigating the newly established legal cannabis financial market. 
Moderator: Gaynell Rogers (Treehouse Global Ventures)Panelists: Joyce Cenali (Big Rock Partners), Al Foreman (Tuatara)

How Hemp Helps Around the Farm: Hemp, Animals & Agriculture.The Nelsons have long rallied support for the American family farmer. No Luck Summit would be complete without a conversation around hemp and its benefits for animals and agricultural practices. We’ll explore the history of hemp usage as animal feed and soil replenishment while diving into the ways hemp is being reintegrated into modern day agriculture practices.
Moderator: Hunter Buffinton (Hemp Feed Coalition) Panelists: Dan Hunter (Assistant Commissioner, TX Dept. of Agriculture), Dr. Clair Thunes, Vanessa Snyder (Eurofins Hemp & Botanics), Morgan Ellioit (IND HEMP)

Musical performances by Early James, Devon Gilfilian, Marcus King, Jonathan Tyler, Aaron Lee Tasjan, The Nude Party, and more. 

To register or view the full summit schedule, please click here. To read Variety’s take on the lineup and summit, please click here

Additionally, team Luck has partnered with the much-loved podcast, Great Moments in Weed History. The episodes released in partnership with Planting the Seed will dive deep into humanity’s 10,000+ year relationship with cannabis to find the humor, heart, and historical importance of this very special plant. As part of the Luck Summit, hosts Abdullah Saeed and David Bienenstock proudly present five short films tracing Willie Nelson’s sixty-year love affair with cannabis—from his first toke in Fort Worth, Texas in 1954 to the creation of his very own cannabis company. The first episode, “Willie and Weed: The Origin Story,” is available now, and features Ethan Hawke and Charlie Sexton. 

Click here to watch. 
A special thanks to our sponsors: Rocket Seeds, Koan, Willie’s Reserve, GRAV, Greenbelt Botanicals, Gibson, Clay Imports, Dad Grass and Weed, and Whiskey News.
Sign up:Planting the Seed is a donation-based ticketed event raising money for HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project, an organization that informs, registers and turns out voters who are interested in cannabis policy. To register or for more information on the High Holidays as a whole, please click here

Join the Luck Seed Summit Cannabis Convention, presented by Willie Nelson and Luck (4/26 – 4/29)

Wednesday, April 7th, 2021

Willie Nelson and Luck Presents announce first annual cannabis convention, Luck Summit: Planting the Seed, benefiting HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project.

The Virtual programming begins on 4/26 and will air through Willie Nelson’s birthday on 4/29

“I think people need to be educated to the fact that marijuana is not a drug. Marijuana is an herb and a flower. God put it here. If He put it here and He wants it to grow, what gives the government the right to say that God is wrong?”-Willie Nelson

Hosted by Nathanial Rateliff, the multi-day virtual summit seeks to destigmatize, educate, and promote cannabis culture in an informative and entertaining way. During the summit, Luck and fellow cannabis-advocate partners will showcase the cannabis plant through its many lenses including history, science, entertainment, and culture. In addition to panel discussions and keynote speakers, attendees will be treated to musical collaborations, comedy sketches, cooking demonstrations, health-focused activities, and more. 

Additionally, team Luck is pleased to announce a partnership with the good folks at HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project, an organization that informs, registers and turns out voters who are interested in cannabis policy. “Willie Nelson is a music and cannabis icon, so of course we’re thrilled to partner,” says Sam D’Arcangelo, Director of HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project.

“Texas and the rest of the United States are sitting at a cannabis crossroads right now. There’s no better time to celebrate how far we’ve come and have a conversation about where cannabis legalization goes from here.” All ticket proceeds from the summit will be donated to the Voter Project to aid in their efforts. 

Who is Planting the Seed for? The summit will hold space for honest, stripped down dialogue between industry veterans, casual connoisseurs, activists, artists, and everyone in between. Have something to say or questions about the benefits and opportunities surrounding hemp and cannabis as a commodity, and as medicine? This summit is for you.

What’s on the discussion docket? Civil discourse, building community, legalization through policy amendments, science, de-stigmatization, hemp and cannabis as commodity products and cash crops, taxation that aids the economy, decriminalization and pathways toward freeing non-violent offenders for cannabis convictions, de-stigmatizing cannabis in industries weary of engaging, cannabis history and prohibition, and so much more. 
The mission of the Luck Summit is to create a community discussion around destigmatizing, decriminalizing, and legalizing hemp and cannabis in the state of Texas and beyond. 

Sign up: Planting the Seed is a donation-based ticketed summit raising money for HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project. To register or for more information on the High Holidays, please visit high.holiday
Planting the Seed is the marque event of Luck’s “High Holidays,” a 9 day celebration of the cannabis plant and its many benefits which begins on 4/20 and ends on Willie’s birthday, 4/29.

Additionally, Luck Presents is petitioning the Biden Administration and Congress to make 4/20 to 4/29 the “High Holidays” in honor of the cannabis industry, and to celebrate Willie’s birthday.

Sign the petition here

Visit high.holiday for more information. 
Luck Presents is a rogue cultural collective headquartered in Willie Nelson’s Luck, TX. Anchored by its flagship event, the annual Luck Reunion, Luck Presents creates experiences that embrace our past while cultivating new traditions in American roots culture. 

HeadCount’s Cannabis Voter Project informs, registers, and turns out voters who want to see cannabis policy move forward. We believe cannabis reform is a unique issue with the power to turn large numbers of people into active participants in our democracy.

Wednesday, April 7th, 2021

Willie’s Reserve Now Available in Arizona

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

www.MarijuanaTimes
by: Ashley Oakes Scott

Willie Nelson, an award-winning musician and activist has partnered with Hana Meds to bring his legendary stash of cannabis pre-rolls, Willie’s Reserve, to Arizona. Willie Nelson has been a true supporter of the cannabis industry, speaking up about the benefits through responsible and regulated cultivation and sale. 

The three products from Willie’s Reserve that are now available in the Arizona market are sativa-dominant Golden Goat, hybrid Headband, and indica-dominant Bubba Kush. The three strains come in “High Five Packs” and will contain five whole-flower, no-trim, half-gram pre-rolls in a collectible branded tin. 

In order to bring the brand to another state due to federal regulations, Willie’s Reserve sought one of the best vertically integrated cannabis companies, Hana Meds, to partner with. Hana Meds brought the first pre-roll brand to the legalized Arizona cannabis market, Dutchie. Dutchie is known for its classic vibe but plethora of unique, potent, and consistent strains.

Read article here. 

“I don’t smoke weed to get high,” — Willie Nelson

Saturday, December 5th, 2020

“I channeled my Willie Nelson”

Thursday, November 19th, 2020

Rob The Original

” I Drank some @rebelcoastwinery and channeled my inner Willie Nelson today.”

New Nathaniel Rateliff strains for Willies Reserve

Monday, May 11th, 2020

Willie Nelson defines American Music

Tuesday, April 21st, 2020

photo: Robert Mora/Getty Images

www.cmt.com/news
by: Edward Norris

Willie Nelson grew to greatness while country music was also maturing as a distinct art form. He was born in 1933, a month before Jimmie Rodgers, the Father of Country Music died, and the same year Bob Wills formed the Texas Playboys. Nelson’s arrival into the world came a decade before the Carter Family disbanded and Ernest Tubb joined the Grand Ole Opry.

Born in Abbott, Texas and raised by his paternal grandparents, Nelson was learning the guitar and writing songs before he reached his teens. He would go on to become one of the most recorded and recognizable figures in the history of American music, regardless of genre. Along the way he would record 70 studio albums, 33 live albums, 25 albums with other artists, and soundtracks for movies he appeared or starred in. The number of singles he’s done for and with other artists are beyond counting.

Between 1962, when he charted his first single, and 2000, by which time his chart appearances as a singles artist had become rare, Nelson charted 117 songs.

Here’s a quick look at the Old Master’s contributions, honors and impacts during eight decades.

The 1950s

Nelson plays in local bands, books artists, promotes shows, and works as a DJ at stations in Texas and Vancouver, Washington. In 1957, he releases “No Place for Me,” his first self-written, self-recorded and self-promoted single. It’s issued under the Willie Nelson Records label. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1960s

In 1960, Nelson moves to Nashville and signs his first publishing deal. He begins getting major cuts from prominent country artists. Faron Young has a No. 1 in 1961 with “Hello Walls.” Billy Walker takes “Funny How Time Slips Away” to No. 23 the same year. Patsy Cline rings up a No. 2 with “Crazy,” also in 1961.

Nelson signs with Liberty Records in 1962 and proceeds to have a Top 10 that year with “Willingly,” a song recorded with his future wife, Shirley Collie. He does even better with his next single, “Touch Me,” his own composition, which rises to No. 7. That will be his biggest chart success as a recording act for the rest of the decade. But he has accumulated enough stature to join the Grand Ole Opry in 1964. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1970s

This is the decade that Nelson develops into full bloom. Chastened by his lack of success as a recording artist in Nashville, Nelson moves back to Texas, where he gradually evolves from the clean-cut, turtle-neck wearing dandy into the hippie persona he will inhabit for the rest of his life.

He stages the first of his cross-cultural music festivals July 4, 1973, in Dripping Springs, Texas. In 1975, he releases his bare bones concept album, Red Headed Stranger (which producer Billy Sherrill described as sounding like “a bad demo”). It becomes a big hit and yields Nelson — by now 44 years old — his first No. 1 single, “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.” The landmark song also nets him his first Grammy. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
The next year, RCA, Nelson’s former label, assembles an album of formerly unreleased tracks by Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jennings’ wife Jessi Colter, and Tompall Glaser of the Glaser Brothers. It’s titled Wanted! The Outlaws and launches the “outlaw” movement.

With future classics like “Good Hearted Woman,” it not only romanticizes Waylon & Willie, but inspires other artists to exert more control over the music they record, including writing or choosing the songs and, often, recording with their own bands rather than with studio musicians. The project becomes country’s first platinum album. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
Nelson turns out six more No. 1s during the 1970s, two of them with Jennings. In 1978, with his recording success to give him leverage, Nelson records an entire album of pop songs he’d loved in his youth — Stardust. It, too, becomes a bestseller and stays on the country chart for 10 years!

Nelson becomes something of a movie star in 1979 via his supporting role in the Robert Redford-Jane Fonda film, The Electric Horseman. By the end of the decade, he has a total of three Grammys on his shelf, all for his vocal performances. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1980s

This might be described as the “Willie & Me” decade because it’s bursting with duet efforts. During it, he records albums with Ray Price, Roger Miller, Webb Pierce, Waylon Jennings (2), Merle Haggard (2), Kris Kristofferson, Faron Young and Hank Snow.

Then there are his collaborative No. 1 hits: “Just to Satisfy You” (with Jennings), “Pancho and Lefty” (Haggard), “To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before” (Julio Iglesias), “Seven Spanish Angels” (Ray Charles), “Highwayman” (Jennings, Kristofferson, Johnny Cash) and “Mind Your Own Business” (Hank Williams Jr., Reba McEntire, Tom Petty, Reverend Ike). Embedded from www.youtube.com.
May of his own solo hits during this era are now considered classics: “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys,” “On the Road Again,” “Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground,” and “Always on My Mind,” to name a few.

Concerned about the number of American family farms going into bankruptcy, Nelson co-founds Farm Aid in 1985. Except for two years, it has been held annually ever since, always with Nelson co-headlining it. Nelson also acts in several movies during the 1980s, notably Honeysuckle Rose (1980), Barbarossa (1982), The Songwriter (1984) and Red Headed Stranger (1987). He adds three more Grammys to his collection, including the President’s Merit Award in 1986. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 1990s

Talk about emotional extremes! Discovering that his accountants have failed to pay his taxes, Nelson begins the ’90s deep in debt and stripped of most of his assets. With typical resourcefulness, he sits down with just his guitar and records the ironically titled 1991 album The IRS Tapes: Who’ll Buy My Memories? It doesn’t settle his debt, but it helps, and it nets him tons of useful publicity.

Then, only two years later, he’s inducted the Country Music Hall of Fame. Among the 14 studio albums he turns out during this decade are two with his piano-playing sister, Bobbie Nelson: the gospel collection How Great Thou Art and Hill Country Christmas. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
His choice of material ranges from Paul Simon’s “Graceland” on 1992’s Across the Borderline to his own self-written, self-produced tracks on 1996’s Spirit. In 1999, he turns to producer Daniel Lanois to create the more musically adventurous collection, Teatro, with Emmylou Harris guesting. It features several of Nelson’s earlier but less known compositions.


The 2000s

Nelson begins the new century receiving a lifetime achievement Grammy, then collects another Grammy for “Mendocino County Line,” a duet with Lee Ann Womack. In 2003, he and Ray Price release the album Run That By Me One More Time. The same year, he joins admirer Toby Keith for the single “Beer For My Horses,” which promptly gallops into No. 1. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
SiriusXM rebrands its classic country station in 2006 from Hank’s Place to Willie’s Place (and, in 2011, Willie’s Roadhouse). Nelson, Price and Merle Haggard return to the studio to record the poignant 2007 collection Last of the Breed, with its pensive track “Lost Highway” winning a Grammy.

In 2009, Nelson tips his hat to fellow Texan and Hall of Fame songwriter with the tribute album You Don’t Know Me: The Songs of Cindy Walker. In a more lively turn, he teams up in 2009 with the western swing band Asleep at the Wheel to pump out Willie and the Wheel. As he periodically does, he returns to the Great American Songbook for his final album of the decade, American Classics. It features guest appearances by Norah Jones and Diana Krall. Embedded from www.youtube.com.
The 2010s

Nelson continues to try his hand with new producers and new backup musicians in 2010 when he pairs with T. Bone Burnett for the album Country Music. (Burnett had worked his career-revivalist wonders earlier in the decade with Ralph Stanley.) The album digs deep in the traditional country repertoire to spotlight such great perennials as “Dark as a Dungeon,” “Freight Train Boogie,” “House of Gold” and “I Am a Pilgrim.”

Nelson reunites with Merle Haggard in 2015 for Django & Jimmie, a loving tribute to Nelson’s idol, the gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt and Haggard’s chief inspiration, Jimmie Rodgers. Haggard dies the following year. Two albums earn Nelson best traditional pop vocal Grammys: Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin (2016) and My Way (2018), his hat-doffing to the songs of Frank Sinatra. Embedded from www.youtube.com.


The 2020s

Earlier this year, Nelson won his 10th career Grammy Award for the title track of his 2019 album, Ride Me Back Home, in the category of best country solo performance. He promises his 70th studio album for July 2020, First Rose of Spring. It rings out with such eternals as “I’ll Break Out Again Tonight,” “Just Bummin’ Around,” “I’m the Only Hell My Mama Ever Raised” and “Yesterday When I Was Young.”

Willie Nelson IS American music — and he’s got the records to prove it.

Willie Nelson interview on hemp

Sunday, March 1st, 2020