Archive for the ‘Songs’ Category

Willie Nelson, “Still is Still Moving to Me”

Thursday, December 12th, 2019

When people ask me which of the songs Ive written are my favorites, “Still is Still Moving” always comes up near the top of the list. The band and I play it at almost every concert, and I’ve recorded it countless times, as well, so you have got to figure the song means something important to me.

Sometimes I wonder if perhaps the song is me.

Whether you look at the song from the point of view of ancient philosophies or from the modern knowledge of quantum physics, there is great motion in all stillness, and true stillness at the heart of all action.

The early Chinese philosophers referred to hits in the concept of something called wu wei, which suggests fulfilling every task with the least necessary action. Two notes are not required when one will suffice. Twenty words may not say something better than ten, or one. For me, that word is stillness.

No matter how still I am, the world around me is abuzz with activity, and the world within me as well. Modern physics tells us that the atoms in our body ” and all the particles and forces that make up those atoms ” are never at rest. While our bodies and the world around us seem solid, that physical appearance is merely an illusion, for each of our atoms is comprised primarily of empty space.

If your life in this modern world seems to pass you by at the speed of light, perhaps you could consult Einstein, who proved that the faster we travel, the more time is compressed. That’s right, the faster we go, the less time we have. So what is your hurry?

This may not mean much to you, but it must be quite traumatic for the atoms. Would you like to hear an atom joke? I didn’t think so, but here is one anyway:

A neutron went into a bar and says, “How much for a beer?”

The bartender says, “For you, no charge.”


The Tao of Willie: A Guide to the Happiness in Your Heart

The Tao of Willie Nelson
by Willie Nelson, with Turk Pipkin

Congratulations, Johnny Bush, “Whisky River” sung 2,000,000 times

Monday, November 11th, 2019

I think Willie has sung it that many times himself.

Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline and “Crazy”

Wednesday, November 6th, 2019
Photo credit: Michael Ochs

How Patsy Cline and Willie Nelson Teamed up for Her Hit Song “Crazy”

The up-and-coming songwriter and country music singer found common ground on a crossover classic that cemented both artists’ reputations.

www.biography.com
by: Tim Ott

While he is hailed today as one of the iconic musicians of his time, there was a time when Willie Nelson was trying to sell his songs for meal money like a fruit vendor on the streets.

Such was the case when he arrived in Nashville, Tennessee in 1960, a broke balladeer armed with a trove of songs that would eventually become hits for other artists, including a yearning ballad for a lost lover that was originally called “Stupid,” before getting retitled as “Crazy.”

At the time, country singer Patsy Cline was enduring her own professional and personal difficulties, her momentum stalled since her 1957 breakthrough with “Walkin’ After Midnight.” In June 1961, as she was finally making headway with a much-needed follow-up hit, “I Fall to Pieces,” she was in a horrific car accident that left her hospitalized in critical condition.

Nelson brought a demo to Cline’s home but wouldn’t go inside

Things were soon looking up for both artists. “I Fall to Pieces” reached the top spot on the country charts while Cline was recuperating, and word was out around Nashville’s music community that she was ready to make another splash. Meanwhile, Nelson had scored a gig with Pamper Music, his reputation as a gifted, albeit unorthodox, songwriter gaining steam thanks to his recent successes for Faron Young (“These Walls”) and Billy Walker (“Funny How Time Slips Away”).

There are differing accounts of how “Crazy” wound up with the chanteuse who delivered its definitive version. According to Willie Nelson: An Epic Life, Cline’s husband and manager, Charlie Dick, had irritated his wife by playing a Nelson song over and over, leaving a bad taste in her mouth when the songwriter’s name was mentioned. As a result, when Nelson and fellow Pamper Music scribe Hank Cochran arrived a few days later with a demo of “Crazy,” Nelson hid in the car until Cline went out to retrieve “that little son of a b***h” herself.

?In the alternate version relayed in It’s a Long Story: My Life, Nelson claimed he played the “Crazy” demo for Dick at the local hangout, after which Dick insisted on immediately bringing it home for his wife to hear. Because it was after 1 a.m., Nelson was hesitant to go inside, until Cline, a hospitable “sweetheart,” came to get him.

Cline’s reaction to “Crazy” is also disputed. Nelson recalled her saying she was “glad” he wrote the song and planned to record it, while other sources say she had her eye on different material and was loath to take on an aching heartbreaker of this type.

Cline nailed her recording performance in one take

Regardless, “Crazy” was placed on Cline’s recording schedule at producer Owen Bradley’s Quonset Hut Studio. Recognizing the potential in this piece of music, Bradley whipped up a lavish arrangement, focusing on instruments like the drums, electric guitar and piano, unusual for country music at the time. He also pulled in the Jordanaires, a quartet that found fame backing Elvis Presley, for an extra layer of harmonies.

The lead vocals were another story. Nelson’s demo, which featured his idiosyncratic sense of meter and phrasing, left everyone flummoxed as they tried to mold it into a number befitting Cline’s style. Furthermore, the singer was still in pain and unable to belt out certain notes with her customary vigor. After temporarily shelving her input, Cline returned to the studio a few days later and nailed her performance, with its melodic leaps and dramatic pauses, in one take.

There was one more obstacle to “Crazy” reaching the masses: Billy Walker, who valued Nelson after the success of “Funny How Time Slips Away,” had a “hold” on the song that gave him first rights to its release. That was quickly rectified, however, when Cochran promised to provide another hit song in its place.

“Crazy” became one of the biggest jukebox hits of all time

Released in October 1961 by Decca Records, “Crazy” became a No. 2 country hit and rose to No. 9 on the Hot 100, though its chart performance only tells a small part of its legacy. It became one of Cline’s signature songs, the torch of a life cut short by a plane crash a year and a half later, as well as a standard covered by the likes of Loretta Lynn, Linda Ronstadt and LeAnne Rhimes, among others. In 1988, as part of celebrations for the 100th-year anniversary of the jukebox, the Amusement and Music Operators Association named “Crazy” and Presley’s “Hound Dog” as the most-played jukebox hits of all time.

All it took were the combined powers of two legendary artists, one an out-of-the-box songwriter and the other a perfectionist, powerhouse singer, who were crazy enough to tap into the universal longing that made this song a classic for the ages.

Cline nailed her recording performance in one take.

Regardless, “Crazy” was placed on Cline’s recording schedule at producer Owen Bradley’s Quonset Hut Studio. Recognizing the potential in this piece of music, Bradley whipped up a lavish arrangement, focusing on instruments like the drums, electric guitar and piano, unusual for country music at the time. He also pulled in the Jordanaires, a quartet that found fame backing Elvis Presley, for an extra layer of harmonies.

The lead vocals were another story. Nelson’s demo, which featured his idiosyncratic sense of meter and phrasing, left everyone flummoxed as they tried to mold it into a number befitting Cline’s style. Furthermore, the singer was still in pain and unable to belt out certain notes with her customary vigor. After temporarily shelving her input, Cline returned to the studio a few days later and nailed her performance, with its melodic leaps and dramatic pauses, in one take.

There was one more obstacle to “Crazy” reaching the masses: Billy Walker, who valued Nelson after the success of “Funny How Time Slips Away,” had a “hold” on the song that gave him first rights to its release. That was quickly rectified, however, when Cochran promised to provide another hit song in its place.

“Crazy” became one of the biggest jukebox hits of all time
Released in October 1961 by Decca Records, “Crazy” became a No. 2 country hit and rose to No. 9 on the Hot 100, though its chart performance only tells a small part of its legacy. It became one of Cline’s signature songs, the torch of a life cut short by a plane crash a year and a half later, as well as a standard covered by the likes of Loretta Lynn, Linda Ronstadt and LeAnne Rhimes, among others. In 1988, as part of celebrations for the 100th-year anniversary of the jukebox, the Amusement and Music Operators Association named “Crazy” and Presley’s “Hound Dog” as the most-played jukebox hits of all time.

All it took were the combined powers of two legendary artists, one an out-of-the-box songwriter and the other a perfectionist, powerhouse singer, who were crazy enough to tap into the universal longing that made this song a classic for the ages.

Willie Nelson songs

Monday, July 29th, 2019
  • A Moment Isn’t Very Long
  • A Penny For Your Thoughts
  • Alice in Hulaland (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Albania Albania
  • Always Now
  • American Dream (co-written With Bob Dylan)
  • Amnesia
  • And So Will You My Love
  • Angel Flying Too Close To The Ground
  • Annie
  • Any Old Arms Won’t Do (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Are You Ever Coming Home (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Are You Sure (co-written With Buddy Emmons)
  • Ashamed
  • Au Jardin De Mes Reves (Albert Babin, rearranged)
  • Bach Minuet In G (rearranged)
  • Back On The Road (co-written With Nathan Mackey)
  • Back to Earth
  • Baja Oklahoma (co-written With Dan Jenkins)
  • Band of Brothers
  • Bandera
  • Bird (co-written With Robert Braddock, Hal Coleman, Barry Etris, Claude Putman, Jr. And John Bush Shinn III)
  • Bird Medley
  • Blame It On The Times
  • Bloody Mary Morning
  • Blue Rock Montana
  • Both Ends Of The Candle
  • Broken Promise
  • Bring it On
  • Buddy
  • Changing Skies
  • Christmas Blues (co-written With Booker Jones)
  • Christmas Prayer
  • Cling To The Spark
  • Cold Empty Spark
  • Come On Back Jesus
  • Congratulations
  • Country Willie
  • Crazy
  • Cry Softly Darling
  • Crying In The Heart
  • Darkness On The Face Of The Earth
  • Darling Are You Ever Coming Home
  • December Day
  • Denver
  • Devil In A Sleeping Bag
  • Did I Ever Love You
  • Do Your Thing You’re A Cowboy
  • Don’t Say Love Or Nothing
  • Down At The Corner Beer Joint
  • Dream Come True
  • Driving the Herd (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Ehrbares Madchen
  • El Niño
  • Electric Horseman
  • Eleven Dixie Mudcats
  • End Of Understanding
  • Everybody’s Baby
  • Everything But You
  • Everywhere I go
  • Face of a Fighter
  • Family Bible
  • Follow Me Around
  • Following Me Around
  • Forgiving You Was Easy
  • Funny
  • Funny How Time Slips Away
  • Ghost
  • Go Away
  • Goin’ Home
  • Good Hearted Woman (co-written With Waylon Jennings)
  • Good Times
  • Guitar in the Corner
  • Great Divide
  • Half a Man
  • Half Black Half Leopard
  • Happiness Lives Next Door
  • Hard Edge Texas (co-written With Kris Kristofferson)
  • He’s Not For You
  • Healing Hands Of Time
  • Heartaches Of A Fool
  • Heartland
  • Heaven And Hell
  • Heebie Jeebie Blues No. 2
  • Hej Meddig
  • Hello Darling
  • Hello Fool
  • Hello Wall Number 2
  • Hello Walls
  • Hero
  • Hint Of Song
  • Hold Me Tighter
  • Home Is Where You’re Happy
  • Home Motel
  • Homecoming In Heaven
  • Hot Blooded Woman
  • Hot Time In Music City Blues
  • How Does It Feel
  • How Long Is Forever
  • I Am The Forest
  • I Can Cry Again
  • I Can Get Off On You
  • I Can Still Reach Yesterday
  • I Can’t Find The Time
  • I Didn’t Sleep A Wink
  • I Don’t Feel Anything
  • I Don’t Know Where I Am Today
  • I Don’t Understand
  • I Feel Sorry For Him
  • I Gotta Get Drunk
  • I Guard The Canadian Border
  • I Guess I Ve Come To Live Here
  • I Just Can’t Let You Say Goodbye
  • I Just Don’t Understand
  • I Just Stopped By
  • I Let My Mind Wander
  • I Live One Day At A Time
  • I Never Cared For You
  • I Should Have Kissed Her More
  • I Still Can’t Believe You’re Gone
  • I Thought About You
  • I Thought I Left You
  • I Want A Girl
  • I Want To Be Alone
  • I Write You Letters
  • I’d Already Cheated On You
  • I’d Rather You Didn’t Love Me
  • I’ll Stay Around
  • I’m A Memory
  • I’m Building Heartaches
  • I’m Falling In Love Again
  • I’m Gonna Lose A Lot Of Teardrops
  • I’m Not Trying To Forget You
  • I’m So Ashamed
  • I’m Still Not Over You
  • I’m Waiting forever
  • I’ve Got A Wonderful Future
  • I’ve Just Destroyed The World
  • I’ve Loved You All Over The World
  • I’ve Seen All This World I Care to See
  • If You Could Only See
  • If You Really Loved Me
  • In God’s Eyes
  • In The Car Again
  • Is The Better Part Over
  • Is There Something On Your Mind
  • Island In The Sea
  • It Could Be Said That Way
  • It Should Be Easier Now
  • It’s A Dream Come True
  • It’s Not For Me To Understand
  • It’s Not Supposed To Be That Way
  • It’s Only Money (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Jimmy’s Road
  • Jingle Bells (James Pierpont, rearranged)
  • Just As I Am (Charlotte Elliott, William B. Bradbury)
  • Just For The Moment
  • Kneel At The Feet Of Jesus
  • Laying My Burdens Down
  • Laws of Nature
  • Lear And A Limo (co-written With Mickey Raphael)
  • Leave Alone
  • Let Me Be A Man
  • Let My Heart Be Broken
  • Let’s Pretend We’re Strangers
  • Little Old Fashioned Karma
  • Little Things
  • Local Memory
  • Loco
  • London
  • Lonely Little Mansion
  • Looking For A Place To Fall (co-written With Merle Haggard And Freddy Powers)
  • Makin’s Of A Song (co-written With Max Barnes, Waylon Jennings And Troy Seals)
  • Man With the Blues
  • Mariachi
  • Matador
  • Me And Paul
  • Mean Old Greyhound Bus
  • Message
  • Misery Mansion
  • More Than One Way To Cry
  • Mr. Record Man
  • My Kind Of Girl
  • My Love
  • My Love For The Rose
  • My Own Peculiar Way
  • New Way To Cry
  • Night Life
  • No Love Around
  • No Place for Me
  • No Tomorrow In Sight
  • Nobody Said It Was Going To Be Easy
  • Nobody Slides My Friend
  • O’er The Waves (Juventino Rosas, rearranged)
  • Old Age And Treachert
  • On the Road Again
  • On The Road Too Long
  • Once Along
  • One Day At A Time
  • One In A Row
  • One Step Beyond
  • Opportunity To Cry
  • Our Chain Of Love
  • Over You Again
  • Pages
  • Part Where I Cry
  • The Party’s Over
  • Permanently Lonely
  • Pet Wrangler
  • Phases, Stages, Circles, Cycles
  • Pick Up The Pieces
  • Pick Up The Tempo
  • Place To Fall Apart (co-written With Merle Haggard And Freddy Powers)
  • Precious Memories
  • Pretend I Never Happened
  • Pretty Paper
  • Pride Wins Again
  • Promises Promises
  • Pullamo
  • Rainy Day Blues
  • Raysha’s Theme
  • Remember The Good Times
  • Ridge Top
  • Right From Wrong
  • Road Happy (co-written With Dolly Parton)
  • Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die
  • Run Jody Run
  • Sad Songs And Waltzes
  • Save Your Tears
  • Send Me a Picture
  • Shall We Gather
  • She Always Comes Back To Me
  • She Is Gone
  • She Might Call
  • She’s Gone (co-written With Fred Foster)
  • She’s Not For You
  • She’s Still Gone (Shirley Nelson)
  • Shelter Of My Arms
  • Shotgun Willie
  • Sister’s Coming Home
  • Sit On My Lap
  • Sitting Here In Limbo (Written by Jimmy Cliff and Guilly Bright)
  • Slow Down Old World
  • So Much To Do
  • So You Think You’re A Cowboy
  • Solidarity
  • Some Other Time
  • Somebody Pick Up My Pieces
  • Someone Waiting For You
  • Something To Think About
  • Sometimes She Lies (Harlan Howard, rearranged)
  • Somewhere In Texas
  • Songwriter
  • Sorrow Tearing Me Apart
  • Sound In Your Mind
  • Spirit I-iii
  • Spirit Of E Nine
  • Stage Coach Score (co-written With David Alan Coe)
  • Still Is Still Moving To Me
  • Storm Has Just Begun
  • Storm Within My Heart
  • Suffer In Silence
  • Summer Of Roses
  • Sweet Bye And ByeTake My Advice (co-written With David Alan Coe)
  • Take My Word
  • Talk To Me
  • Tell It To Jesus
  • Texas
  • That’s What Children Are For
  • That’s Why I Love Her
  • The Wall
  • There Are Worse Things Than Be
  • There Goes A Man
  • There Is A Fountain
  • There Is No Easy Way
  • There Shall Be Showers Of Blessings
  • There’s A Way
  • There’s Gonna Be Love In My Home
  • There’s No Tomorrow In Sight
  • There’s Worse Things Than Being Alone
  • These Are Difficult Times
  • They’re All The Same
  • Things To Remember
  • Three Days
  • Time Of The Preacher
  • To Make A Long Story Short (She’s Gone)
  • Today’s Gonna Make A Wonderful
  • Too Sick To Pray
  • Too Young To Settle Down (co-written With Jack Rhodes)
  • Touch Me
  • Tougher Than Leather
  • Truth Will Set You Free
  • Turn Out The Lights (co-written By Hank Craig)
  • Twice The Man (co-written With Edwin Griens And Maribeth Murray)
  • Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  • Two Different Roads (Hank Cochran, Jan Crutchfield; rearranged)
  • Two Sides To Every Story
  • Two Stories Wide
  • Uncloudy Day ( THE UNCLOUDED DAY – Original Lyrics & Music: Josiah K. Alwood, circa 1880)
  • Under The Double Eagle
  • Undo The Right (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Used to Her
  • Valentine
  • Waiting Forever For You
  • Waiting Time
  • Wake Me When It’s Over
  • Walking
  • Wanted On Mother (co-written With Harlan Howard)
  • Wasted/Revenge
  • We Don’t Run
  • We Look For Love
  • We Wouldn’t Have It Any Other Way
  • What a Way to Live
  • What Can You Do To Me Now (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • What Do You Think Of Her Now (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • What Do You Want Me To Do
  • What Right Have I
  • When I’ve Sung My Last Hillbilly
  • When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder
  • When We Live Again
  • Where Do You Stand
  • Where Dreams Come to Die (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Where My House Lives
  • Where’s The Show
  • Whiskey River (by Johnny Bush, Paul Stroud)
  • White Cadillac Convertible Blue
  • Who Do I Know In Dallas (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Who’ll Buy My Memories (co-written With Eddie Noack)
  • Why Are You Picking On Me
  • Why Do I Have To Choose
  • Wilie Tuning
  • Will You Remember
  • Will You Remember Mine
  • Within Your Crowd
  • Wives and Girlfriends
  • Wonderful Future
  • Words Don’t Fit The Picture
  • Write Your Own Song
  • Yesterday’s Wine
  • You Don’t Think I’m Funny Anymore
  • You Dream About Me
  • You Left A Long Long Time Ago
  • You Memory Won’t Die
  • You Ought To Hear Me Cry
  • You Took My Happiness Away
  • You’ll Always Have Someone (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Your Country Boy
  • You Wouldn’t Cross The Street

Willie Nelson, “Whatever Happened to Peace on Earth?”

Saturday, June 1st, 2019

Wednesday, October 11th, 2006

I was at a concert this weekend in California to raise money for the National Veterans Foundation. I’m an Air Force veteran, and I have great respect for the military. I like to support the soldiers whenever I can. But I don’t support this war in Iraq.

I was against the war before it started. I always thought it was a terrible decision, badly thought out, badly planned, and then horribly executed.

I want to see our troops come home right away, and so do most Americans. Unfortunately, too many politicians in both parties refuse to listen.

So when will the troops come home? When we won’t put up with it anymore–when we change our government. And how will we do that? By voting the bastards out! On November 7th, you should vote for anyone who’s against the war and vote against anyone who’s for the war. It’s that simple.

When I wrote the song “Whatever Happened to Peace on Earth” (LYRICS) at Christmastime in 2003, a lot of people were for the war, a lot of people didn’t know the facts or the truth. But people are waking up now. They’re learning that they were lied to about the war. They’re feeling lied to about this Mark Foley scandal in terms of who knew what and when. They’re questioning the leadership in this country.

And that gives us new possibilities for November 7th. If we all go out and vote for peace candidates and get our friends to vote, and if our votes are really counted, it’s no contest. There’ll be a change in the Congress, and then we’ll just have to keep building so we can get a president who won’t send our soldiers to fight a war based on lies.

We should have thrown the bastards out years ago. Let’s do it now! Give Peace A VOTE!

Willie Nelson

Willie wrote this song on Christmas, 2003, and performed it for the first time at the Kucinich for President fundraising concert in Austin, Texas, on Jan. 3, 2004.

There’s so many things going on in the world
Babies dying
Mothers crying
How much oil is one human life worth
And what ever happened to peace on earthWe believe everything that they tell us
They’re gonna’ kill us
So we gotta’ kill them first
But I remember a commandment
Thou shall not kill
How much is that soldier’s life worth
And whatever happened to peace on earth(Bridge)
And the bewildered herd is still believing
Everything we’ve been told from our birth
Hell they won’t lie to me
Not on my own damn TV
But how much is a liar’s word worth
And whatever happened to peace on earth

So I guess it’s just
Do unto others before they do it to you


Willie Nelson, “Still is Still Moving To Me”

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

When people ask me which of the songs Ive written are my favorites, “Still is Still Moving” always comes up near the top of the list.  The band and I play it at almost every concert, and I’ve recorded it countless times, as well, so you have got to figure the song means something important to me.

Sometimes I wonder if perhaps the song is me.

Whether you look at the song from the point of view of ancient philosophies or from the modern knowledge of quantum physics, there is great motion in all stillness, and true stillness at the heart of all action.

The early Chinese philosophers referred to hits in the concept of something called wu wei, which suggests fulfilling every task with the least necessary action.  Two notes are not required when one will suffice.  Twenty words may not say something better than ten, or one.  For me, that word is stillness.

No matter how still I am, the world around me is abuzz with activity, and the world within me as well.  Modern physics tells us that the atoms in our body ” and all the particles and forces that make up those atoms ” are never at rest.  While our bodies and the world around us seem solid, that physical appearance is merely an illusion, for each of our atoms is comprised primarily of empty space.

If your life in this modern world seems to pass you by at the speed of light, perhaps you could consult Einstein, who proved that the faster we travel, the more time is compressed.  That’s right, the faster we go, the less time we have.  So what is your hurry?

This may not mean much to you, but it must be quite traumatic for the atoms.  Would you like to hear an atom joke?  I didn’t think so, but here is one anyway:

A neutron went into a bar and says, “How much for a beer?”

The bartender says, “For you, no charge.”

The Tao of Willie: A Guide to the Happiness in Your Heart

The Tao of Willie Nelson
by Willie Nelson, with Turk Pipkin

LeAnn Womack’s Willie Nelson Playlist

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

gary

www.Billboard.com

“Willie Nelson’s music is the great American soundtrack,” Womack says. “He’s an incredible writer and singer and his voice has become so recognizable. I’ve traveled all over the world and I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t know and love Willie’s music.”

Welcome back to Takeover Tuesday, where each week, Billboard taps chart-topping artists and tastemakers to compile their very own playlist exclusive to Billboard’s Spotify account. We give the artists free rein to base the list on whatever subject they choose. The only rule? Make it as creative and unique to them as possible.

Even more than 20 years into her career, Lee Ann Womack is still going strong. The country star received her 11th and 12th Grammy nominations for the 2019 awards, with her ninth studio album The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone receiving a nod for best Americana album and its lead single “All the Trouble” earning one for best Americana roots song.

But before she finds out her Grammy fate on Feb. 10, Womack will first be participating in a special tribute to Willie Nelson, “Willie: Life & Songs of an American Outlaw,” on Jan. 12 at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena. She’ll perform hits from the country legend alongside fellow country artists like Chris Stapleton, Emmylou Harris, Eric Church, Alison Krauss and George Strait; as well as stars of other genres such as The Avett Brothers, Jack Johnson, Jimmy Buffett and John Mellencamp. Ahead of the special night, Womack dedicates her Takeover Tuesday playlist to the country legend.

“Willie Nelson’s music is the great American soundtrack,” Womack says. “He’s an incredible writer and singer and his voice has become so recognizable. I’ve traveled all over the world and I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t know and love Willie’s music.”

Coincidentally, Womack won her sole Grammy with Nelson for their 2002 collaboration “Mendocino County Line,” which is one of the 24 songs Womack selected for her Willie Nelson-inspired playlist. The songstress also included some of Willie’s biggest hits such as “On the Road Again,” “Always on My Mind” and “Whiskey River,” along with some deep cuts such as “Hello Walls” and “The Great Divide.”
Get your Willie Nelson fix with Lee Ann Womack’s playlist below.

Willie Nelson: Just Plain Willie

Friday, July 13th, 2018

published: 1984

Willie Nelson Just Plain Willie Songbook

The Willie Nelson Just Plain Willie Songbook is a top-level instructional book for musicians wanting to learn how to play Willie Nelson music on guitar. This Hal Leonard release comes with a size of 9 x 12 inches and boasts a string of iconic songs, including Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys, You Wouldn’t Cross The Street, Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain, Home Is Where You’re Happy, and more. Mr. Nelson is a bonafide icon of American music, and this book offers one of the best ways to get to know the man – through the power of music.

The great thing about this publication is that it will save you time from those long web searches and lets you pay attention to your playing, making your practice hours far more effective and efficient. The songs are presented in tab and notation form, all of which  are 100 percent accurate and concise. If extra info and details is needed, feel free to contact us online or just come down to the store, we are always glad to be of service. The full list of tunes is available below.

Song list:

* Always On My Mind
* And So Will You, My Love
* Any Old Arms Won’t Do
* Blame It On The Times
* Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain
* Crazy
* End Of Understanding
* Everything But You
* Face Of A Fighter
* Healing Hands Of Time
* Home Is Where You’re Happy
* I Can’t Find The Time
* I Didn’t Sleep A Wink
* I Feel Sorry For Him
* I Hope So
* I Just Don’t Understand
* I Let My Mind Wander
* I’m Building Heartaches
* I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter
* Is There Something On Your Mind
* Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys
* Moment Isn’t Very Long
* My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys
* One Step Beyond
* The Shelter Of Your Arms
* Slow Down Old World
* Some Other Time
* Stardust
* Suffering In Silence
* Things To Remember
* Undo The Right
* Up Against The Wall Redneck
* Why Are You Picking On Me
* Will You Remember Mine
* Without A Song
* You Wouldn’t Cross The Street
* You’ll Always Have Someone

Willie Nelson Songs

Saturday, December 23rd, 2017

Not complete, but that list might be impossible to compile:

  • A Moment Isn’t Very Long
  • Ain’t It Funny How Time Slips Away
  • Alice in Hulaland (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Albania Albania
  • Always Now
  • American Dream (co-written With Bob Dylan)
  • Amnesia
  • And So Will You My Love
  • Angel Flying Too Close To The Ground
  • Annie
  • Any Old Arms Won’t Do (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Are You Ever Coming Home (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Are You Sure (co-written With Buddy Emmons)
  • Ashamed
  • Au Jardin De Mes Reves (Albert Babin, rearranged)
  • Bach Minuet In G (rearranged)
  • Back On The Road (co-written With Nathan Mackey)
  • Back to Earth
  • Baja Oklahoma (co-written With Dan Jenkins)
  • Band of Brothers
  • Bandera
  • Bird (co-written With Robert Braddock, Hal Coleman, Barry Etris, Claude Putman, Jr. And John Bush Shinn III)
  • Bird Medley
  • Blame It On The Times
  • Bloody Mary Morning
  • Blue Rock Montana
  • Both Ends Of The Candle
  • Broken Promise
  • Bring it On
  • Buddy
  • Changing Skies
  • Christmas Blues (co-written With Booker Jones)
  • “Christmas Prayer
  • Cling To The Spark
  • Cold Empty Spark
  • Come On Back Jesus
  • Congratulations
  • Country Willie
  • Crazy
  • Cry Softly Darling
  • Crying In The Heart
  • Darkness On The Face Of The Earth
  • Darling Are You Ever Coming Home
  • December Day
  • Denver
  • Devil In A Sleeping Bag
  • Did I Ever Love You
  • Do Your Thing You’re A Cowboy
  • Don’t Say Love Or Nothing
  • Down At The Corner Beer Joint
  • Dream Come True
  • Driving the Herd (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Ehrbares Madchen
  • El Niño
  • Electric Horseman
  • Eleven Dixie Mudcats
  • End Of Understanding
  • Everybody’s Baby
  • Everybody’s Talking At Me
  • Everything But You
  • Everywhere I go
  • Face of a Fighter
  • Family Bible
  • Follow Me Around
  • Following Me Around
  • Forgiving You Was Easy
  • Funny
  • Funny How Time Slips Away
  • Ghost
  • Go Away
  • Goin’ Home
  • Good Hearted Woman (co-written With Waylon Jennings)
  • Good Times
  • Guitar in the Corner
  • Great Divide
  • Half a Man
  • Half Black Half Leopard
  • Happiness Lives Next Door
  • Hard Edge Texas (co-written With Kris Kristofferson)
  • He’s Not For You
  • Healing Hands Of Time
  • Heartaches Of A Fool
  • Heartland
  • Heaven And Hell
  • Heebie Jeebie Blues No. 2
  • Hej Meddig
  • Hello Darling
  • Hello Fool
  • Hello Wall Number 2
  • Hello Walls
  • Hero
  • Hint Of Song
  • Hold Me Tighter
  • Home Is Where You’re Happy
  • Home Motel
  • Homecoming In Heaven
  • Hot Blooded Woman
  • Hot Time In Music City Blues
  • How Does It Feel
  • How Long Is Forever
  • I Am The Forest
  • I Can Cry Again
  • I Can Get Off On You
  • I Can Still Reach Yesterday
  • I Can’t Find The Time
  • I Didn’t Sleep A Wink
  • I Don’t Feel Anything
  • I Don’t Know Where I Am Today
  • I Don’t Understand
  • I Feel Sorry For Him
  • I Gotta Get Drunk
  • I Guard The Canadian Border
  • I Guess I Ve Come To Live Here
  • I Just Can’t Let You Say Goodbye
  • I Just Don’t Understand
  • I Just Stopped By
  • I Let My Mind Wander
  • I Live One Day At A Time
  • I Never Cared For You
  • I Should Have Kissed Her More
  • I Still Can’t Believe You’re Gone
  • I Thought About You
  • I Thought I Left You
  • I Want A Girl
  • I Want To Be Alone
  • I Write You Letters
  • I’d Already Cheated On You
  • I’d Rather You Didn’t Love Me
  • I’ll Stay Around
  • I’m A Memory
  • I’m Building Heartaches
  • I’m Falling In Love Again
  • I’m Gonna Lose A Lot Of Teardrops
  • I’m Not Trying To Forget You
  • I’m So Ashamed
  • I’m Still Not Over You
  • I’m Waiting forever
  • I’ve Got A Wonderful Future
  • I’ve Just Destroyed The World
  • I’ve Loved You All Over The World
  • I’ve Seen All This World
  • If You Could Only See
  • If You Really Loved Me
  • In God’s Eyes
  • In The Car Again
  • Is The Better Part Over
  • Is There Something On Your Mind
  • Island In The Sea
  • It Could Be Said That Way
  • It Should Be Easier Now
  • It’s A Dream Come True
  • It’s Not For Me To Understand
  • It’s Not Supposed To Be That Way
  • It’s Only Money (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Jimmy’s Road
  • Jingle Bells (James Pierpont, rearranged)
  • Just As I Am (Charlotte Elliott, William B. Bradbury)
  • Just For The Moment
  • Kneel At The Feet Of Jesus
  • Laying My Burdens Down
  • Laws of Nature
  • Lear And A Limo (co-written With Mickey Raphael)
  • Leave Alone
  • Let Me Be A Man
  • Let My Heart Be Broken
  • Let’s Pretend We’re Strangers
  • Little Old Fashioned Karma
  • Little Things
  • Local Memory
  • Loco
  • London
  • Lonely Little Mansion
  • Looking For A Place To Fall (co-written With Merle Haggard And Freddy Powers)
  • Makin’s Of A Song (co-written With Max Barnes, Waylon Jennings And Troy Seals)
  • Man With the Blues
  • Mariachi
  • Matador
  • Me And Paul
  • Mean Old Greyhound Bus
  • Message
  • Misery Mansion
  • More Than One Way To Cry
  • Mr. Record Man
  • My Kind Of Girl
  • My Love
  • My Love For The Rose
  • My Own Peculiar Way
  • New Way To Cry
  • Night Life
  • No Love Around
  • No Place For Me
  • No Tomorrow In Sight
  • Nobody Said It Was Going To Be Easy
  • Nobody Slides My Friend
  • O’er The Waves (Juventino Rosas, rearranged)
  • Old Age And Treachert
  • On the Road Again
  • On The Road Too Long
  • Once Along
  • One Day At A Time
  • One In A Row
  • One Step Beyond
  • Opportunity To Cry
  • Our Chain Of Love
  • Over You Again
  • Pages
  • Part Where I Cry
  • The Party’s Over
  • Permanently Lonely
  • Pet Wrangler
  • Phases, Stages, Circles, Cycles
  • Pick Up The Pieces
  • Pick Up The Tempo
  • Place To Fall Apart (co-written With Merle Haggard And Freddy Powers)
  • Precious Memories
  • Pretend I Never Happened
  • Pretty Paper
  • Pride Wins Again
  • Promises Promises
  • Pullamo
  • Rainy Day Blues
  • Raysha’s Theme
  • Remember The Good Times
  • Ridge Top
  • Right From Wrong
  • Road Happy (co-written With Dolly Parton)
  • Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die
  • Run Jody Run
  • Sad Songs And Waltzes
  • Save Your Tears
  • Send Me a Picture
  • Shall We Gather
  • She Always Comes Back To Me
  • She Is Gone
  • She Might Call
  • She’s Gone (co-written With Fred Foster)
  • She’s Not For You
  • She’s Still Gone (Shirley Nelson)
  • Shelter Of My Arms
  • Shotgun Willie
  • Sister’s Coming Home
  • Sit On My Lap
  • Sitting Here In Limbo
  • Slow Down Old World
  • So Much To Do
  • So You Think You’re A Cowboy
  • Solidarity
  • Some Other Time
  • Somebody Pick Up My Pieces
  • Someone Waiting For You
  • Something To Think About
  • Sometimes She Lies (Harlan Howard, rearranged)
  • Somewhere In Texas
  • Songwriter
  • Sorrow Tearing Me Apart
  • Sound In Your Mind
  • Spirit I-iii
  • Spirit Of E Nine
  • Stage Coach Score (co-written With David Alan Coe)
  • Still Is Still Moving To Me
  • Storm Has Just Begun
  • Storm Within My Heart
  • Suffer In Silence
  • Summer Of Roses
  • Sweet Bye And Bye
  • Take My Advice (co-written With David Alan Coe)
  • Take My Word
  • Talk To Me
  • Tell It To Jesus
  • Texas
  • That’s What Children Are For
  • That’s Why I Love Her
  • The Wall
  • There Are Worse Things Than Be
  • There Goes A Man
  • There Is A Fountain
  • There Is No Easy Way
  • There Shall Be Showers Of Blessings
  • There’s A Way
  • There’s Gonna Be Love In My Home
  • There’s No Tomorrow In Sight
  • There’s Worse Things Than Being Alone
  • These Are Difficult Times
  • They’re All The Same
  • Things To Remember
  • Three Days
  • Time Of The Preacher
  • To Make A Long Story Short (She’s Gone)
  • Today’s Gonna Make A Wonderful
  • Too Sick To Pray
  • Too Young To Settle Down (co-written With Jack Rhodes)
  • Touch Me
  • Tougher Than Leather
  • Truth Will Set You Free
  • Turn Out The Lights (co-written By Hank Craig)
  • Twice The Man (co-written With Edwin Griens And Maribeth Murray)
  • Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  • Two Different Roads (Hank Cochran, Jan Crutchfield; rearranged)
  • Two Sides To Every Story
  • Two Stories Wide
  • Under The Double Eagle
  • Undo The Right (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Used to Her
  • Valentine
  • Vir Ewig Is Ek Joune
  • Waiting Forever For You
  • Waiting Time
  • Wake Me When It’s Over
  • Walking
  • Wanted On Mother (co-written With Harlan Howard)
  • Wasted/Revenge
  • We Don’t Run
  • We Look For Love
  • We Wouldn’t Have It Any Other Way
  • What a Way to Live
  • What Can You Do To Me Now (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • What Do You Think Of Her Now (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • What Do You Want Me To Do
  • What Right Have I
  • When I’ve Sung My Last Hillbilly
  • When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder
  • When We Live Again
  • Where Do You Stand
  • Where Dreams Come to Die (co-written with Buddy Cannon)
  • Where My House Lives
  • Where’s The Show
  • Whiskey River (by Johnny Bush, Paul Stroud)
  • White Cadillac Convertible Blue
  • Who Do I Know In Dallas (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Who’ll Buy My Memories (co-written With Eddie Noack)
  • Why Are You Picking On Me
  • Why Do I Have To Choose
  • Wilie Tuning
  • Will You Remember
  • Will You Remember Mine
  • Within Your Crowd
  • Wives and Girlfriends
  • Wonderful Future
  • Words Don’t Fit The Picture
  • Write Your Own Song
  • Yesterday’s Wine
  • You Don’t Think I’m Funny Anymore
  • You Dream About Me
  • You Left A Long Long Time Ago
  • You Memory Won’t Die
  • You Ought To Hear Me Cry
  • You Took My Happiness Away
  • You’ll Always Have Someone (co-written With Hank Cochran)
  • Your Country Boy
  • You Wouldn’t Cross The Street

Willie Nelson, “Pretty Paper”

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017

Willie Nelson’s sad ‘Pretty Paper’ is a real story. And it’s set in downtown Fort Worth

Whiskey River: the story behind the song

Monday, November 13th, 2017

by David Scarlett
Country Weekley

Johnny Bush’s career as a solo artist was taking off in the early ’70s when he came to a disc jockey convention in Nashville to sign a deal with RCA records.  That’s where the Texas native met RCA executive Jerry Bradley, who planted the seed for “Whiskey River,” a song that would blossom into one of the best-loved — and most recorded — in all of country music.

At the time, Johnny had already experienced sucess with a series of hits including, “You Gave Me a Mountain” and “My CUp Runneth Over.”  Still, Jerry wanted him to write a very special song.

Johnny picks up the story.

“Jerry told me, ‘Johnny, what we’ve got to do now is, you’ve gotta write a hit.’   And I said, ‘Jerry, with all the songwriters in Nashville — Harlan Howard, Willie Nelson, Hank Cochran, Bill Anderson and people like that we can draw from — you want me to write the song?.”

But Jerry knew Johnny had a hit in him, and put the ball back in Johnny’s court.

“On my way back to Texas from Nashville,”  continues Johnny, “I was on my tour bus and when I woke up in Texarkana, I had the idea about ‘Whiskey River.’  And by the time I got home, I had it written.”

Johnny’s recording of the song went on to becoem a Top 15 hit, but his longtime Texas buddy, Willie Nelson, recorded it and made it a huge hit in 1978 — and his signature tune.  In fact, Willie has recorded the song over twenty times.

And it’s a good thing.  The royalty checks from the song helped sustain Johnny through some lean years that resulted from a rare vocal disorder.

“I’d jsut released ‘Whiskey River’ and it was climbing the charts when it struck,” he recalls.   As a result, Johnny’s career took a serious downturn and it would be years before his vocal problem was correctly diagnosed and treated.  Now he’s got a new album, Green Snake, and is back working as many dates as he wants to.

But ‘Whiskey River’ and his pal, Willie, were always there for him.  Willie even joined Trick Pony in recording the tune for the group’s upcoming album.

“I just hope it makes the cut,” says Johnny modestly.  “You know a lot of time songs are recorded that never make it onto the album.”

Don’t worry Johnny.  It’ll be there.

— David Scarlett

20 Great Willie Nelson Songs

Sunday, October 1st, 2017

www.wideopencountry.com
by:  Jonathan Frahm

There are many reasons why Willie Nelson is a revered name in country music. They range from his 1962 debut to his part in founding the outlaw movement with his partners Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson. Then there are tales that tell of his softer side with his sister Bobbie and the Family Band. The Red Headed Stranger’s legacy runs deeper than some might expect.

There are a slew of songs that Willie has undoubtedly made his own. Yet, it seems for every song he’s written that is undeniably a Nelson song, there’s another iconic tune he’s penned for another influential artist.

In other cases, it’s his own covers that Willie’s done particular justice. With a taste that ranges from Ray Charles to the Great American Songbook and Coldplay, you can bet this legend has made his mark on a wide spread of songs.

There’s just something everlasting about Willie Nelson’s talents. Since …And Then I Wrote was released 55 years ago, the Texas outlaw has released a whopping 172 albums. Among them are dozens of long-lasting hits that have secured his place as one of America’s finest singer-songwriters to ever live.

“Always On My Mind”

Although it’s arguably the song Willie Nelson is best known for, “Always On My Mind” isn’t even a tune that he’d written himself. It was penned by Denver songwriter Wayne Carson, Johnny Christopher and Mark James and was first recorded by Gwen Macrae in 1972. While Elvis Presley and Brenda Lee released their own versions that same year, it was Willie’s rendition that broke records and went platinum a decade later.

“Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground”

Near the peak of his popularity in the mid-1980s, Willie starred in a romantic drama called Honeysuckle Rose. Not only did he play the lead character, Buck Bonham, but he also wrote songs to feature in the film, including “Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground.” The heartbreaking love song remains a staple in country music today, from Austin to Nashville and all around the world.

“Bloody Mary Morning”

Willie originally wrote “Blood Mary Morning” in 1970 to reflect his worries about parenting. When it was reworked for his concept album 1974 cover album Phases and Stages, the song took on a whole new meaning, this time about heartbreaking rambler about a jilted man left by his lover.

“Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain”

Nelson hit his stride in the mid-70s, and it’s this song that is often credited for revitalizing his career. Originally written by Fred Rose in the 1940s, other country greats like Hank Williams had already recorded renditions of the song. But it’s Willie’s stripped-back take on this traditional country tune that resonates the most with listeners today.

“Blue Skies”

“Blue Skies” exemplifies Willie Nelson’s knack for taking a tune from the Great American Songbook, and transforming it into something that’s all his own. The song was written in 1926, as a last-minute addition to the musical The Jazz Singer. Nelson’s version gives the standard a bluesy, dreamy quality.

“City of New Orleans”

Nelson has covered a number of old folk songs in his day, the most notable being Steve Goodman’s “City of New Orleans.” Arlo Guthrie had the first notable cover in 1972, but Nelson’s 1984 recording brought the tune all the to No. 1 on the Billboard charts. Goodman even won a posthumous Grammy Award for writing the song in 1985 as a result.

“Crazy”

Most songs that Nelson writes are best associated with his own quirky twang and ability to sink just about any arrangement right into his offbeat phrasing. That said, “Crazy” is best known as Patsy Cline‘s breakout hit and for many a good reason.

“Funny How Time Slips Away”

Written by Willie all the way back at the start of his career in 1961, it wasn’t until 2001 that he released a studio version of the song alongside Juice Newton. However, he’s performed it for decades alongside many of his contemporaries. The track was received well by the country music community long before him and Newton’s rendition. It was recorded by 15 other artists prior to Nelson and Newton’s take, including George Jones and Al Green.

“Georgia On My Mind”

It may not be as iconic as Ray Charles‘ take in 1960, but Willie still offered enough gusto to this easygoing and soulful rendition that it’s often remembered by his fans as one of his very best covers.

“Good Hearted Woman”

Amongst all of The Highwaymen, it’s Willie’s relationship with Waylon Jennings that may well be the most warmly regarded. The two put out a string of hits together, and it all started with “Good Hearted Woman” in 1971.

“Hello Walls”

Near the very start of his career in the early 1960s, Willie Nelson was already exercising his songwriting muscle and shopping tunes around to other performers. Faron Young was one of the first to notably take on one of Willie’s tunes, with “Hello Walls” becoming a big success for him in 1961. It spent 23 weeks at the top of the Billboard charts. Willie released his own smooth-crooning version the following year.

“Last Thing I Needed the First Thing This Morning”

Unlike other songs written by other names in the business, Willie Nelson was the first to offer up his take on this “cover.” He once again proves that he’s just as prolific a songwriter as he is an interpreter, offering such a genuine take on heartbreak that one wouldn’t be remiss to assume he’d written it himself. More recently, Chris Stapleton took on his own soulful rendition on From A Room, Vol 1.

“Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys”

Another hit record of Waylon and Willie’s was featured on their 1978 duet album of nearly the same name. The anthemic country swing tune went on to win a Grammy for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

“Mr. Record Man”

At the start of his career, Willie Nelson was down on his luck. Finding himself in poverty, he tried selling “Mr. Record Man” to Larry Butler, who instead gave him as job as one of his songwriters. When his songs proved to be successes for other artists, Willie was recognized by Liberty Records and given his own gig as a country singer. Henceforth, his own take on “Mr. Record Man” was one of his first notable performances.

“My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys”

Honeysuckle Rose wasn’t the only film that Nelson wrote songs for. Although his buddy Waylon first put out his take on the song in 1976, it Willie’s version that was featured in The Electric Horseman film. It’s a reflection on the dream of being a cowboy set directly up against its reality that many listeners may be able to relate to.

“On the Road Again”

What might very well be Nelson’s most iconic song was written on a barf bag, of all things. Most noteworthy, though, is its rollicking “train beat” and enduring tale of travel. Those alone make it a country music chestnut for the ages.

“Pancho and Lefty”

Often seen as Townes Van Zandt’s most well-known song, several dutiful interpreters of song have covered it over the years. All the while, it’s Willie and Merle’s rendition that stands best alongside Townes’ as a stunning take on this classic outlaw ballad.

“Seven Spanish Angels”

After releasing his own take on a Ray Charles tune, the two musical megatons came together to perform a duet. The two artists crossover into each other’s lanes magnificently on the track, culminating into a ballad that is just as much country as it is gospel and soul.

“The Scientist”

Who knew that Willie Nelson and Coldplay would go together so well? At 76 years old in 2011, Willie brings a weathered and wizened version of this heart-wrenching contemporary classic. Consequently, it even rivals the quality of the original.

“Whiskey River”

Originally recorded by Johnny Bush, Willie Nelson put his stamp on this song back in ’73 on Shotgun Willie. Since then it’s become one of his go-to songs at live shows. This includes its sport as the opening track on the setlist for his live album Live at Billy Bob’s Texas. As always, he puts his own stamp on the song with this rollicking rendition worthy of any country road trip.

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Willie Nelson, “Still is Still Moving to Me”

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

When people ask me which of the songs I’ve written are my favorites, “Still is Still Moving” always comes up near the top of the list.  The band and I play it at almost every concert, and I’ve recorded it countless times, as well, so you have got to figure the song means something important to me.

Sometimes I wonder if perhaps the song is me.

Whether you look at the song from the point of view of ancient philosophies or from the modern knowledge of quantum physics, there is great motion in all stillness, and true stillness at the heart of all action.

The early Chinese philosophers referred to hits in the concept of something called wu wei, which suggests fulfilling every task with the least necessary action.  Two notes are not required when one will suffice.  Twenty words may not say something better than ten, or one.  For me, that word is stillness.

No matter how still I am, the world around me is abuzz with activity, and the world within me as well.  Modern physics tells us that the atoms in our body ” and all the particles and forces that make up those atoms ” are never at rest.  While our bodies and the world around us seem solid, that physical appearance is merely an illusion, for each of our atoms is comprised primarily of empty space.

If your life in this modern world seems to pass you by at the speed of light, perhaps you could consult Einstein, who proved that the faster we travel, the more time is compressed.  That’s right, the faster we go, the less time we have.  So what is your hurry?

This may not mean much to you, but it must be quite traumatic for the atoms.  Would you like to hear an atom joke?  I didn’t think so, but here is one anyway:

A neutron went into a bar and says, “How much for a beer?”

The bartender says, “For you, no charge.”


The Tao of Willie Nelson
by Willie Nelson, with Turk Pipkin

 

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Willie Nelson, “Living in the Promiseland”

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

Nora Jones’ favorite Willie Nelson songs

Monday, September 4th, 2017

www.wfuv.org
by: Kara Manning

Norah Jones might have broken into the mainstream consciousness as a jazz and pop artist, a path she followed on her most recent album, Day Breaks, but the Texas-raised musician has always been a country music aficionado at heart.

She co-founded the alt-country The Little Willies — named after Willie Nelson — nearly 15 years ago with fellow heartland music lovers Richard Julian, Jim Campilongo, Lee Alexander and Dan Rieser. On the Little Willies’ two albums, their eponymous 2006 debut and 2012’s For The Good Times, the group ebulliently covered songs by a large swath of American legends, like Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and, of course, Nelson, this week’s FUV Essentials artist.

Jones has performed with Nelson many times, in the studio on standards like “Baby It’s Cold Outside,” found on his 2009 album American Classic, or joining him live in 2010 at Farm Aid 25, singing songs like Alexander’s “Lonestar” (which appeared on Nelson’s 2002 live album, Willie Nelson & Friends – Stars & Guitars).

When FUV broadcast Willie Nelson and Family’s concert at the BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival in August 2015, Jones was there in the crowd, watching Nelson and his band with a broad smile on her face, reveling in his great classics. Their kinship is one of mutual admiration, humor, collaborative intuition and respect. FUV reached out to Jones to write about the recordings and songs that mean the most to her, by her friend and fellow Texan.

Norah Jones: Five Essential Willie Nelson Songs:

“Permanently Lonely,” Crazy: The Demo Sessions (2003)
This song is one of my favorites. The turn of phrase, melody, and chord changes. So beautiful and simple, yet very complex which I didn’t realize until I tried to cover it! He really cuts straight to the bone on this one.

“Funny How Time Slips Away,” VH1 Storytellers with Johnny Cash & Willie Nelson (1998)
There are so many great versions of this song but this is my favorite, just stripped down with Willie and Johnny Cash on guitar. This is also one of my favorite Willie guitar solos. As a song it’s biting, heartbreaking, and funny. It’s a good story song with a little knife-in-the-back at the end.

“Things to Remember,” The Demos Project, Vol. 1 (2003)
Great honky tonk song and vibe. And he sings so good.

“Washing the Dishes” into “Walking,” Phases and Stages (1974)
The first two songs go together so beautifully. It goes from this gorgeous jazz-tinged guitar ballad with moments of Brazil, and then the second part is a killer country song. He made some amazing concept albums and these two tracks really capture that magic.

“Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain,” Red Headed Stranger (1975)
From my favorite album of all time — Red Headed Stranger. A classic. It shows how he makes every song his own, even the ones he didn’t write.

– Norah Jones
August 2017

More:
The Little Willies: Live Concert 2011

The Little Willies: Words and Music 2012