Archive for the ‘television’ Category

Willie Nelson Tribute Concert on A & E (April 12, 2020)

Wednesday, March 4th, 2020

www.Tennesseean.com
by: Dave Paulson

See dozens of photos here.

Remember when more than two dozen big-time musicians — including George Strait, Dave Matthews, Sheryl Crow and Kris Kristofferson — gathered at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena to pay tribute to Willie Nelson? And then the country legend played a set of his own classics?

Well, for the last 14 months, we’d just say you had to be there — but soon, you’ll be able to see it on TV.

Cable network A&E will premiere “Willie Nelson: American Outlaw” on Sunday, April 12, at 9 p.m. CT. 

It’s part of A&E’s new slate of country music programming that also includes “Biography” editions on Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers.

“Biography: Dolly” premieres Sunday, April 12, at 7 p.m. CT, and “Biography: Kenny Rogers” will follow on Monday, April 13, at 8 p.m. CT.

Other performers at the 2019 tribute concert included Chris Stapleton, Alison Krauss, John Mellencamp, Lee Ann Womack, Eric Church, Jimmy Buffett, Emmylou Harris, the Avett Brothers and Jack Johnson. 

Believe it or not, before this show, Nelson and Strait — two giants of Texas country music — had never performed together.

That was made abundantly, amusingly clear with a brand-new original tune from the two, wherein the “King of Country” laments, “I ain’t never got to sing one with Willie.”

Willie Nelson to perform at Opening of Tribeca Film Festival, Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020

photo: Rick Diamond

www.RollingStone.com
by: Angie Mortoccio

The 19th Annual Tribeca Film Festival happens April 15-26 in NYC. While they haven’t announced this year’s slate of films, the opening night event will be the world premiere of new documentary Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President at Beacon Theatre on April 15. In addition to the screening, there will be live performances from Willie Nelson, Nile Rodgers, Paul Shaffer, and more to be announced. No word on tickets to this event but festival passes and bulk ticket packages for the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival are on sale now.

Read More: Willie Nelson, Nile Rodgers & more playing 2020 Tribeca Film Fest opening night | http://www.brooklynvegan.com/willie-nelson-nile-rodgers-more-playing-2020-tribeca-film-fest-opening-night/?trackback=tsmclip

Willie Nelson, Diana Ross, Dolly Parton appear in a teaser for Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President, a new documentary about the 39th President of the United States. The film will open the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival at New York’s Beacon Theatre on April 15th, followed by a performance by Nelson.

Directed by Mary Wharton — who helmed 2009’s Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound — the film focuses on the music that shaped Carter’s life. Vintage performances by Muddy Waters and the Allman Brothers Band can be seen in the clip, as Garth Brooks talks about Carter while Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Simple Man” plays in the background: “His love for music makes all kind of sense to me, because music is the voice of the heart,” Brooks says in the film. “Music is the voice of the soul.”

The 2020 Tribeca Film Festival runs from April 15th through the 26th in New York City. Ticket packages are on sale now, while single passes will go on sale March 17th.

This day in Willie Nelson history: “King of the Hill” (February 16, 1996)

Sunday, February 16th, 2020

Willie Nelson made a special guest voice appearance as himself on the ‘King of the Hill’ episode ‘Hank’s Got the Willies’ which aired Sunday, Feb. 16, 1996 on FOX.

Hank’s Got The Willies
Episode KH105

Bobby attempts to make amends after he accidentally wallops Hank’s idol, Willie Nelson, in the head with a golf club.

Hank catches Bobby furiously windmilling his beloved Guild guitar, “Betsy.” Bobby explains that he was playing the instrument with a piece of cheese, like his favorite comedian, Celery Head. After examining the guitar, Hank realizes his son chipped Betsy’s bridge. The next day, Bobby crashes Hank’s lawn mower into the front of his truck. Shortly thereafter, the boy uses Hank’s pitching wedge to hit clumps of dog excrement. When Hank tells his wife that their son seems bent on destroying everything he owns, Peggy suggests he take Bobby golfing. At first, Hank dismisses the idea outright. But when Bobby tells his father that his two heroes are Gameboy champ Eddie Stillson, and Howard Adderly, the father of bizarre worm-child Jason Adderly, Hank decides he needs to take his son golfing immediately.

Before he takes his son golfing, Hank drives Betsy to a local guitar shop. Along the way, Hank tries to think of a suitable hero for Bobby. Hank tells his son that his own idol has always been Willie Nelson, as he was born in Texas, plays the guitar, and loves to golf. After dropping Betsy off for repairs, Hank joins Dale, Bill and Boomhauer for a game of golf. Bobby pulls his father’s club from a bag and chips a ball right into a cup. Impressed, Hank allows Bobby to tee-off on the next hole. Bobby takes a mighty swing…and lets go of the club, which gracefully tumbles through the air until it strikes another golfer in the head. The foursome rush to the hapless victim’s side, only to discover the man is none other than Hank’s hero, Willie Nelson.

After apologizing for the accident, Hank asks Nelson for his autograph. Nelson takes a pencil in hand, but still suffering from his injury, he slumps forward into the steering wheel of his golf cart, leaving a signature that is nothing more than a straight line. Before Hank has a chance to tell Willie that he is his hero, the singer’s cart picks up speed and races down a hill.

Convinced he cost his father the opportunity of a lifetime, Bobby rides his bicycle (with a guitar case strapped to the handlebars) to Willie Nelson’s mansion (now property of the United States Government). He finds Nelson playing Gameboy in a nearby trailer. Bobby phones his father with news that Nelson has invited him to a barbecue party. When Hank arrives, he finds the singer strumming Betsy.

Willie flips the guitar around and shows Hank that he autographed the instrument (the signature is identical to the straight line autograph from the golf course). Hank telephones his wife and invites her over to the barbecue. When she arrives, Peggy meets Dennis Hopper, who begins to flirt. Furious at Hank for showing the guitar so much attention, Peggy stomps towards her husband. But she melts when she hears Hank singing a song about how much he loves her.

Willie Nelson and Austin

Sunday, February 9th, 2020

Willie Nelson on Real Time with Bill Maher (January 24, 2013)

Friday, January 24th, 2020
“There has never been a recorded instance of an overdose of marijuana. I have living proof sitting beside me.” — Bill Maher

Willie Nelson & Family, “Bloody Mary Morning” (Austin City Limits 1974)

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Willie Nelson on the Marty Stuart Show (January 8, 2011)

Wednesday, January 8th, 2020
Eddie Stubbs started the show by introducing the guests. “From Nashville, Tennessee, the country music capital of the world and home of the air castle of the south, it’s time for The Marty Stuart Show, featuring Marty Stuart, the Rolls Royce of country singers Miss Connie Smith, the ole Tennessee Slicker Leroy Troy, along with all the Fabulous Superlatives: Cousin Kenny Vaughan, Handsome Harry Stinson, the Apostle Paul Martin, plus Gary Carter on the steel guitar, and today’s special guest, Country Music Hall of Famer Willie Nelson. Join us now for 30 minutes of fun and great country music. I’m Eddie Stubbs. Now how ’bout a Superlative welcome for our host, a Mississippi-pedigreed guiter pickin’ man,. here is Marty Stuart.” Eddie added, “Got the pedigree.” Marty said, “Thank you, Mr. Stubbs.” Marty and His Fabulous Superlatives performed “Branded.”
To see lots more pictures from Willie’s appearance on the show, and read stories about the show, visit: http://www.martystuart.com/mss-1-8-11.htm.

Willie Nelson on CBS This Morning (January 2015)

Monday, January 6th, 2020

Ken Burn’s, “Country Music” airing again on Jan 3 on PBS

Tuesday, December 31st, 2019

Willie Nelson featured in “County Music” — by Ken Burns (episodes now streaming on PBS)

Saturday, October 26th, 2019

www.pbs.org

Stream them here at PBS site, also you can purchase the videos there.

Explore the history of a uniquely American art form: country music. From its deep and tangled roots in ballads, blues and hymns performed in small settings, to its worldwide popularity, learn how country music evolved over the course of the 20th century, as it eventually emerged to become America’s music.

Country Music features never-before-seen footage and photographs, plus interviews with more than 80 country music artists. The eight-part 16-hour series is directed and produced by Ken Burns; written and produced by Dayton Duncan; and produced by Julie Dunfey.

Country Music explores questions –– such as “What is country music?” and “Where did it come from?“–– while focusing on the biographies of the fascinating characters who created and shaped it — from the Carter Family, Jimmie Rodgers and Bob Wills to Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Loretta Lynn, Charley Pride, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Garth Brooks and many more — as well as the times in which they lived. Much like the music itself, the film tells unforgettable stories of hardships and joys shared by everyday people.

Very interesting Timeline of Country Music here.

The Voice contestants cover, “Always on My Mind”

Monday, October 21st, 2019


www.TasteofCountry.com

The Voice Season 17 continued Monday night (Oct. 21) with a full-on dive into the Battle Rounds, which features contestants going head-to-head and also receiving instruction from special guest star mentors as well as coaches Blake Shelton, Kelly Clarkson, Gwen Stefani and John Legend.

The first solidly country pairing of the night came not from Shelton’s team, but rather from Clarkson, who paired her straight-up country lane contestant Jake Hoot—a single dad from Tennessee whom she repeatedly claims sounds like Ronnie Dunn—with Steve Knill, who is a soulful, more adult contemporary-styled vocalist from San Francisco. With the help of pop star Normani as mentor, Clarkson put the two to work on Willie Nelson’s classic “Always on my Mind.”

“People might see that as a country song,” Clarkson noted, but added,  “Ray Charles has done it. Rod Stewart has done it.” She even encouraged Krill, who is engaged to marry his partner, to use the pronoun “boy” instead of “girl” while singing the song.

The pairing was an inspired one, as the two singers’ voices melded beautifully on the classic. Both Shelton and Legend preferred Hoot, with Shelton noting, “Jake has the most awesome, perfect amount of nasal to be a good country singer,” and adding that he will always go with the more traditional stylistic choice. Stefani leaned a little more toward Krill, calling his voice “extraordinary.”

The final decision came down to Clarkson, of course, who ended up going with Hoot. “I grew up hearing this song at 6:00 AM. every morning in our household,” she explained.  “I love Willie Nelson, and you both executed it perfectly… I am a sucker for straight-up, old-school country, and that’s what Jake is.”

Knill was not saved or stolen, so unfortunately will be heading

Willie Nelson on David Letterman Show (1984)

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Monk meets the Red Headed Stranger (October 11, 2002)

Friday, October 11th, 2019
monk7


www.usanetwork.com

Is country superstar Willie Nelson a cold-blooded murderer? The police think so – but Monk has other ideas.

SYNOPSIS:
An angry Willie Nelson accuses his road manager, Sonny Cross, of embezzlement just hours before making a San Francisco radio appearance. Sonny later arrives at the radio station to find a note summoning him to a side entrance. As Sonny disappears down an alley, two shots ring out, and an engineer throws open the side door to find a blind woman, Mrs. Mass, screaming hysterically – and Willie Nelson hovering over Sonny’s dead body.

An injured Captain Stottlemeyer decides to put Lt. Disher in charge of the investigation, and Disher loses no time in calling in Adrian Monk. Monk learns that only Sonny, Mrs. Mass, and Willie Nelson were in the alley, and even though he seems to be the most likely suspect. Monk can’t picture Willie – a favorite singer of his late wife Trudy – as a killer. Stottlemeyer arrives with his right arm in a sling. Mrs. Mass gently shakes his left hand, then identifies Willie’s voice as the one that threatened to kill her if she spoke to the police. Orphaned at 16 in a car accident that also robbed her of her sight, Mrs. Mass is a persuasive witness. Things look grim for the Red-Headed Stranger.

With Sharona gushing about her great new boyfriend Justin, and the SFPD occupied with trying to track down a persistent and elusive streaker, Monk starts to investigate. He begins by learning more about Sonny Cross. A reckless womanizer and boozehound, Cross had previously served two years in prison for vehicular manslaughter. Willie had been close to firing Cross on many occasions, but never had the heart.

For now, Willie Nelson is still the prime suspect, and the police arrest him and formally press charges. Meanwhile, Monk decides to go see Mrs. Mass again. He learns she received a concussion after falling in a wet supermarket aisle the year before, but never sued. As they say goodbye, she offers to shake his hand, and Monk suddenly remembers how she’d previously shaken Stottlemeyer’s hand – and offered him her left hand because his right hand was in a sling. How had she known that… unless she had somehow regained her sight!

The SFPD has finally caught the streaker, and Monk bails him out of jail so he can lay a trap for Mrs. Mass. From a place of concealment, Monk and Sharona watch Mrs. Mass turn her head in wonder as the nudist streaks by her ¿ and Sharona recognizes the streaker as her new boyfriend, Justin!

Once in custody, Mrs. Mass finally comes clean: the fall last year in the supermarket somehow reconnected her optic nerve, restoring partial vision in one eye. She’d kept this miracle to herself in order to be above suspicion when she took finally her revenge on Sonny Cross – the drunk driver that took away her family and her eyesight 30 years before.

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All charges against Willie Nelson are dropped, and on a crisp autumn sky under a sparkling blue sky, the two new friends play a soulful, moving duet together – Willie on guitar, Monk on clarinet – at the site of Trudy’s grave.

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Ken Burn’s “Country Music” on PBS tonight

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

www.abc30.com
by: Liz Harrison

The sixteen-hour film chronicles country music from its roots in hymns and blues in the early years in the 1920s through the period of rock and roll and finally into the 1990s.By Liz HarrisonThursday, July 25, 2019

Burns, along with his co-creators Dayton Duncan and Julie Dunfey have spent the last eight years interviewing more than 100 country music stars.

After recording 1,000 hours worth of footage, the three have put together the story of Country Music in America.

“You can dance to it, you can make love to it, you can play it at a funeral. It has something in it for everybody,” said Burns.

It’s a story the creators believe will resonate with everyone not just country music fans. Burns says each song describes some truth about the human experience.

“There’s nobody in the world that hasn’t fallen in love, there’s nobody that hasn’t fallen out of love,” said Burns. “There’s nobody that hasn’t been lonely at some point, and thee’s a country music song for all those emotions. And as Charlie Pride says in our film, ‘it might make you cry but you’ll feel better for doing it.’”

From Charlie Pride to Willie Nelson to Garth Brooks and Dolly Parton each songwriter has a unique voice to add to the documentary.

When Merle Haggard’s parents settled in the Valley during the Great Depression, another country music story was birthed.

Ken Burns says it’s Haggard’s songs of struggle that have made him such an important figure in country music history.

He and his team are grateful they were able to record Merle Haggard before his death three years ago.

“Merle Haggard is like God. I mean, he is one of the greatest. He’s been called the poet of the common man,” said Burns.

The sixteen-hour film chronicles country music from its roots in hymns and blues in the early years in the 1920s through the period of rock and roll and finally into the 1990s. You watch the “Country Music” documentary beginning on September 15th on Valley PBS.

Willie Nelson featured in Ken Burns’, “Country Music” on PBS (Sept. 15th)

Sunday, September 8th, 2019

Tune in or Stream Sunday, September 15 at 8/7c

Explore the history of a uniquely American art form: country music. From its deep and tangled roots in ballads, blues and hymns performed in small settings, to its worldwide popularity, learn how country music evolved over the course of the 20th century, as it eventually emerged to become America’s music.

Country Music features never-before-seen footage and photographs, plus interviews with more than 80 country music artists. The eight-part 16-hour series is directed and produced by Ken Burns; written and produced by Dayton Duncan; and produced by Julie Dunfey.

Country Music explores questions –– such as “What is country music?” and “Where did it come from?“–– while focusing on the biographies of the fascinating characters who created and shaped it — from the Carter Family, Jimmie Rodgers and Bob Wills to Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Loretta Lynn, Charley Pride, Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Garth Brooks and many more — as well as the times in which they lived. Much like the music itself, the film tells unforgettable stories of hardships and joys shared by everyday people.

No one has told the story this way before.

Soundtrack:

Ken Burns’ ‘Country Music’ is right on key (review)

www.madison.com
by: Bruce R. Miller

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE, SEE PHOTOS AND VIDEOS HERE

It’s the songs, stupid.

That’s what makes country music so popular. Able to tap into emotions many feel, the songs boast “three chords and the truth” and lifetimes of experience.

In Ken Burns’ stellar documentary, “Country Music,” we learn how the genre started, how it blossomed and how it’s faring, even now when overnight sensations are expected. Spread over 16 hours, the series gets dozens of artists, managers, writers and executives to distill the music and track its growth from southern Appalachia to the world.

Interestingly, those songs incorporate all kinds of instrumentation (and rhythms), but still have strong stories at their core and, usually, a singer who’s able to emote from experience. One by one, Burns and company tick off the big names – Jimmie Rodgers, the Carter Family, Bill Monroe, Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton – and show how they’re connected.

Country music, Burns and company contend, has a through line, one that binds its artists and fans as family. It’s easy to see how the Carters and Cash are connected (he married into the clan). But where does that leave someone like Parton or Garth Brooks? Writer Dayton Duncan does a masterful job connecting the dots and showing how an 11-year-old Marty Stuart was able to go from a local fair to the Grand Ole Opry. (Stuart vowed he was going to marry singer Connie Smith one day and, sure enough, he did.) Stuart, in fact, is the documentary’s best “witness,” able to demonstrate how sounds differed and tell stories about the folks who created them.

Parton, Brooks, Loretta Lynn, Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson get to chime in on their own piece of the puzzle (they’re great storytellers, obviously), but it’s someone like Brenda Lee who has even better observational skills. In the mix with the biggest names, she was able to see what was brewing. And she’s not afraid to say Lynn led the life Tammy Wynette sang about, while Wynette lived the life Lynn chronicled.

Drugs and booze are common denominators in many stories. Relationship problems are practically a given.

Country music reflects the times (it became a salve for money-tight folks following the Depression) and becomes a pawn for big business. It also serves as a lure for The Beatles, Bob Dylan and others. And, yes, “Country Music” details all of the back and side roads.

Read rest of article here.