Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Willie Nelson & Family play to sold out crowd in Modesto (5/8/2019)

Sunday, May 12th, 2019
photo: Andy Alfaro

www.modbee.com

Country icon Willie Nelson kicked off the first full season Wednesday evening for Modesto’s new amphitheater, bringing along other musicians to join him on stage.

son kicked off the first full season Wednesday evening for Modesto’s new amphitheater, bringing along other musicians to join him on stage.

Nelson, who turned 86 last week, played to a sell-out crowd as he brought his “Willie Nelson & Family” tour into the Fruit Yard Basi Insurance Nationwide Amphitheater.

Its marked the third time Nelson has visited the valley — but it’s been a while. He played at California State University, Stanislaus, in 1993 and at the State Theatre in 2003.

Sunday, May 12th, 2019

“Ninety-nine percent of the world’s lovers are not with their first choice. That’s what makes the jukebox play.” — Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, “Don’t Think Twice (it’s all right)”

Sunday, May 12th, 2019

New Album from Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

www.JamBase.com
by: Andy Kahn
Andy Kahn

Lukas Nelson & Promise of The Real’s new album, Turn Off The News (Build A Garden), will be released on June 14. The LP coming out on Fantasy Records features the lead single, “Bad Case.”

Co-produced by the band and John Alagia, Turn Off The News (Build A Garden) was recorded straight to analog tape at Shangri-La studio in Malibu and at the Village Studios in West Los Angeles. Guests who contributed to the record include Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Sheryl Crow, Margo Price, Micah Nelson, Kesha, Shooter Jennings, Randy Houser, Lucius, Madison Ryann Ward and Hunter Elizabeth.

“We wanted these songs to be fun and upbeat, but we also wanted to have something to say,” Lukas Nelson stated. “Rock ‘n’ roll began as a countercultural movement, so in the true spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, we’re trying to encourage a lifestyle where people can be active in their local communities, rather than glued to a device. We listen to so many artists – The Byrds, Tom Petty, Al Green, Neil Young, Little Feat, JJ Cale – and this album carries forth something they all represented, the idea of turning off the news and doing something constructive. It’s a statement about how you can live your life with your heart leading the way.”

“We wanted these songs to be fun and upbeat, but we also wanted to have something to say,” Lukas Nelson stated. “Rock ‘n’ roll began as a countercultural movement, so in the true spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, we’re trying to encourage a lifestyle where people can be active in their local communities, rather than glued to a device. We listen to so many artists – The Byrds, Tom Petty, Al Green, Neil Young, Little Feat, JJ Cale – and this album carries forth something they all represented, the idea of turning off the news and doing something constructive. It’s a statement about how you can live your life with your heart leading the way.”

Turn Off The News (Build A Garden) Tracklist

  1. Bad Case
  2. Turn Off The News (Build A Garden)
  3. Where Does Love Go
  4. Save A Little Heartache
  5. Lotta Fun
  6. Civilized Hell
  7. Mystery
  8. Simple Life
  9. Out In LA
  10. Something Real
  11. Stars Made Of You
  12. Turn Off The News (Build a Garden) [Acoustic]
  13. Consider It Heaven

Willie Nelson & family in Burbank

Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

Willie Nelson performs Tuesday, May 7, 2019 at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts.
photo: Will Bucquoy
www.pressdemocrat.com

Willie Nelson and Chip Carter get high on top the White House

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

Photograph by Bill Fitz-Patrick, via National Archives.

www.Washingtonian.com
by: Andrew Beaujon

Rolling Stone‘s new “weed issue” includes a well-told story that’s always worth retelling: The night in 1977 when Willie Nelson got high on the roof of the White House. In his profile of Nelson as a stonerPatrick Doyle places the music legend’s aerial adventure in context of a recent bust in the Bahamas:

Before the arrest, he had been invited by Jimmy Carter, for whom Nelson had performed during his campaign. Nelson was photographed arriving on the back lawn wearing tennis shoes and a bandanna. “Oh, he laughed about it,” he says of Carter’s reaction to his Bahamas bust. “Why not?”

That night, after singing in the Rose Garden, Nelson went to sleep with his wife, Connie, in the Lincoln Bedroom. Then one of the president’s sons knocked on his door.

“Chip Carter took me down into the bottom of the White House, where the bowling alley is,” Nelson says. Then they went up to the roof and smoked a joint. Nelson remembers Carter explaining the surrounding view — the Washington Monument, the string of lights on Pennsylvania Avenue. “It’s really pretty nice up there,” Nelson says.

Nelson’s free use of Chip Carter’s name followed years of silence about who exactly accompanied him upstairs. In 2015 both he and Chip Carter fessed up to Chris Heath, whose account of a phone call with Carter is an underappreciated nice moment in journalism:

At first Carter seems to, very briefly, laugh.

“Well,” he says, “he told me not to ever tell anybody.”

I tell Carter that I believe the cat is now out of the bag.

“Okay,” he says evenly.

Then I continue, inquiring whether I can ask him some more about what happened.

“No,” he says. “No, you can’t. Thank you.”

And that is when James Earl Carter III hangs up.

It’s now legal to use pot in private residences in DC, but if for some reason he were invited back during Donald Trump‘s presidency, Nelson would face a similarly tough enforcement climate to 1977’s: The White House is in a National Park and occupies a dark green rectangle on this map of where you very definitely should not get high in DC.

“No bad Days” — Poodie Locke

Monday, May 6th, 2019

Poodie Locke died ten years ago today on May 6, 2009. He’s still missed.

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Hard to believe, Poodie left us 8 years ago today. Still miss seeinghim at shows.

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DSC_0192 by you.

Country Line Magazine
June 2002
PoodieLocke: Country Music’s Backstage Legend
by Sheryl Bucsanyi

Poodie Locke, Willie Nelson’s stage manager for almost 30 years has heard and seen it all. And, he doesn’t mind telling it the way it is or the way it was.

Poodie is a nickname he ws branded with since he was a kid. “I guess, because I was a mess. I don’t know,” Poodie says.

I ask Poodie to describe himself in three words. “Pretty f#%*@ lucky.” He stops laughing, thinks, and decides to say, “A gifted life.”

In his spare time he likes to play golf, drink tequila, and chase women, but not necessarily in that order. His motto for life is “a fartin’ horse never tires.” He also claims that a rolling stone gathers neither moss nor dirt.

His proudest accomplishment is getting a job with Willie andstill being alive. “We’re still here. We’re the oldest band and crew alive who still travels. “We’ve outlived outlived the Beatles. We got underwear older than most of those kids who are playing right now,” Poodie confesses.

Poodie was 12 years old when he met Willie in Waco. ” Who is Willie Nelson?”, Poodie says, “The king of the common man.”

I asked him if he could tell me something about Willie that no one else knows. “Yes, but I can’t put it in print.” Poodie tells me how Willie is a national treasure, but that he’s definitely had his lower moments. “He’s had five wives, hell what do you think?”

Riding on the road for about 275 days a year, Poodie says keeps him young. When Poodie first started out on the road he says that every day was a story. Their first bus was previously owned by Porter Wagner and Dolly Parton. It had 6 bunks in the back and three private cabins. “We were in hog heaven. We were bullet proof. We were young.”

Poodieexplains, “Willie got real hot real fast. We did eight shows in eight days. Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain went from member 70 to number one in two weeks. And then, we didn’t come back for eight months. We had to buy new underwear in Arizona.

In the words of Willie according to Poodie, ‘Indecision may or may not be our biggest problem. Strive to be mediocre and those who contribute must leave.’ We are like the most unorganized bunch andpeople try to organize us. One guy from the Rolling Stones lasted only one gig because he couldn’t findthe gig or the band.”

Poodiesays that the band wasn’t hired. “It was conceived. The people in this organization stay.”

Willie is 69 years old. He jogs five miles a day, plays 18 holes of golf, does 2 1/2 hour shows, and then signs autographs for 2 hours. “The man is an animal,” Poodie says. I ask him what was Willie’s secret. Poodie insists that it’s the road. It keeps you alive and it keeps you going. I go home and see people my age, ones I went to school with ahd they’re old.” They look old.” Born in 1952 in Waco, Poodie’s birthday is the same day as Stevie Ray Vaughan – October 3.

Surrounded by gifted women in show business, Poodie has had flings or relationps with legendary Emmy Lou Harris, Tanya Tucker and Bonnie Raitt. “I was married to Bonnie Rait once, until we got sober,” Poodie admits. He has also shopped with Dolly once when she was wearing a t-shirt and no wig or makeup.

Austin area country western singer Kevin Fowler walks up, “I’m trying to find something good to say about you, Poodie,” Kevin jokes. “Nah, he’s a true friend to Texas musicians.”

Poodie comments, “He (Kevin) used to have hair on his ass, now there ain’t none at all.”

Kevin says that Poodie gave him a gig at the Hilltop when no one else would. First Kevin would play for tips and$50. Then he got a band and was paid $100. “Then,” Poodie says, “He started selling thongs and it was all downhill from there.” Kevin offers me an onion ring. “Sample this.” This is what it’s all about, Kevin insists.

There are two memorable moments that stick out in Poodie’s mind. The first one was when they played for the 92nd Airborne in North Carolina for 25,000 soldiers. “It was during the IRS ordeal.” According to Poodie, the general placed his hand on Willie’s shoulder and said, “Let me tell you something Willie Nelson. We know you’ve had a little trouble with the government, and I know it wasn’t your fault. Everyone here at the 82ndAirborne will defend you and build a perimeter aound you to protect you anytime, anywhere. You are what America is all about.”

Poodie says that they paid their taxes to a guy in Connecticut who didn’t pay their taxes nor filed them causing Willie a two and half million-dollar debt. Poodie says that they ended up filing suit.

The second unforgettble experience was playing at the Olympics. Willie wore his cowboy hat and black jacket. “Willie’s presence was not advertised before hand. He sang Bridge Over Troubled Waterstalking through the chorus saying, “That will ease our mind.” Poodie says that Willie signed about 2,000 autographs to Russians, Chinese, everybody. “He’s like the grandfather of the world.” Somebody told Poodie, “Ya know they’re taking medals away from these athletes for doing drugs, but they bring Willie Nelson to close the damn Olympics. What’s up with that?”

Poodie believes that marijuana should be legalized. “Nobody is going to smoke a joint and go kill 10 kids at McDonald’s”, Poodie preaches. “I never smoked any pot like that. And I’ve smoked a lot of pot in many different places all over the world.”

Flashing back to the fairgrounds in Baton Rouge, Poodie remembers when Wille’s crew played with Jimmy Buffet, Jerry Jeff Walker and Asleep at the Wheel. Willie’s time to perform was supposed to be at 9 p.m. They didn’t go on until 1 a.m. “We did everything we could waiting ” drank five cases of beer. We were toast. And Bee Spears, the bass player, walked over to Willie and goes, tell ya what Willie boy, you don’t have a hair on your ass if you don’t play until the sun comes up. Willie goes (Poodie playing an imaginary guitar) dair, dair and dair for 7 1/2 hours. It started out 50 to 60,000 people. When the sun came up, there was still about 20,000 people there,” Poodie tells. “Willie never peed. I couldn’t believe it. Bee just went over and peed off the side of the stage and never stopped playing.

The Caesar’s Palace in Vegas is not known for entertainers wearing blue jeans. However, Willie played two shows a day for two weeks. Bee and Poodie met a couple of riggers at 4.a.m. in a bar. “Bee is the craziest human being next to Dennis Hopper who is dangerously crazy,” Poodie claims. “The worst thing Bee can say to you is hey, I got this great idea.” Bee asked one of the riggers, whose father used to rig for Mary Martin on Broadway’s Peter Pan, if he could fly.

Willie had written this song, Angels Flying Too Close to the Ground, for his wife at the time named Connie. “We’ve been up for about a week. Bee’s hair looked like a firecracker hit it. He took off his boots andhad a mouth full of water Bee was flying up and around behind Wilie. The crowd started going crazy. Willie thought it was cause he was rockin. Bee is hilarious. Then Willie saw Bee and Bee spit water on him. The whole place cracks up. Willie thought it was funny and then made Bee sing a song in his socked feet because Bee hates to sing. You could do a whole book on Bee.”

The most interesting person Poodie has ever met is Dennis Hopper because “He was the 60s, 70s,80s, and the 90s,” Poodie claims. “Dennis is a time bomb fixin to go off. He would eat five pounds of mushrooms, get naked and scale the Golden Gate Bridge. One time in Peru in the 70s, he ate a bunch of mushrooms and climbed a high line pole naked. Every one of his wives would catch him doing something always when he was naked, and he never could defend himself.”

Poodie’s favorite famous person whom he has met is Walter Cronkite. “The only autographs that I’ve ever got was him and John Wayne,” Poodie says.

Poodie grew up with people like Johnny Cash, Kris Krisstofferson, and Waylon Jennings. According to Poodie, Waylon was a wild and crazy guy who did a lot of drugs and chased a lot of women. Back in the older days, most of the musicians Poodie was around popped pills. Until one day when the crew stopped at a honky tonk and somebody gave Waylon some cocaine.

“Waylon called his road manager over and said, “hey Johnny, that was some good stuff. How much is it?” Johnny said about $2,000 an ounce. Waylon goes, cool get me a pound. Johnny said, I can’t get that for you. I’m not carrying a pound of blow around with me!” Poodie informs.

Poodie describes Waylon as the macho man. “I loved Waylon. He loved to play. He would play for  1/2 horus and if you didn’t like him, he’d play for another hour.”

Kris was very ‘military-oriented and very opinioned.” Poodie remembers how Kris and Waylon used to argue all the time about politics.

I asked Poodie if the story was true about the day Kris andWillie ran out of gas somewhere around Austin and nobody would pick them up. Poodie says, “Yea, they looked to scraggily.”

One time Poodie played golf with Kris in Australia. “Kris hates to lose,” Poodie says. “And he lost $2. He cussed at me for about a week.”

Kris is the “black experience” In the 1984 movie Songwriter, Kris’ character’s name was Blacky Buck. According to Poodie he could get along with Kris’ military-style personality, so he was Kris’ driver. “We would have a 4:30 a.m. call for a 7:30 a.m. shoot. Kris is outside standing on the curb. I get there at 4:45. Now Kris, I say, how many movies have you’ve been in? Ah, 30 or 40 why? What time you actually think we’re gong to do anythinhg? He goes, ah, 5:30 or 7. Then why are we going anywhere at 4:30 a.m.? I just got home!”

Every day, about 200 girls would line up outside of Kris’ trailer. “They wren’t getting autographs or photos.” Poodie announces.

Poodie’s favorite song Kris has written is Sunday Morning Coming Down. Poodie begins singing, “Well I woke up Sunday morning with no way to hold my head that didn’t hurt. And the beer I had for breakfast wasn’t bad, so I had one more for dessert.” Johnny Cash leased this song.

The man in balck, Johnny Cash, is real “Stoic, humble, big and strong.” Poodie demonstrates how Cash could be sitting down andfrom his lap, throws a pill andcatches it in his mouth. “He would take a Percadan from right here and throw it andcatch it in his mouth like a frog. Never missed,” Poodie says.

The Cowboys flew Willie down to play after the Superbowl in Miami in 1976. “I was in the Cowboys’ dressing room with Billy Graham watching Pittsburgh beat their ass when it was like the Lord walked in. Johnny Cash is a huge man. His hands are big like Dennis Rodman big,” Poodie describes.

Dallas lost the game (21-17) but they still had a party. I ask why Billy Graham was there. Poodie answers, “Because he was a big Cowboys fan and Tom Landry was one of his disciples.”

Being raised in a religous family, Poodie believes in a supreme being. “I believe that everybody should have something to believe in. Everybody can have their own God as long as you are on the same track. I was taught to read the Bible. I can even recite the books of the Bible.”

Poodie’s advice to new country artists is to have your own identity, and don’t sound like everybody else.

During this interview Poodie’sfriends surroundhim. One friend, Stiffy Williams decides to demonstrate his talent by singing his song he wrote when they all were in Amsterdam. He sings, “Hey, hey Willie, what’s going on? We’re out on the road and a long ways from home. Smokin lots of week, the girls are fine. I need $20 so I get back in line.  Hot damn I’m in Amsterdam. Hot damn I’m in Amsterdam. Ain’t no body knows who I am. Kept my zipper zipped up, ani’t done nothing wrong….” The circle laughs and applauds.

His mother, Gloria Lock, comes down to Austin to visit her son whenever he’s off the road. She describes him as outspoken, well loved, helpful, and busy. She says that she has met many famous people including James Gardner and that they all call her Momma Locke.

“When I’m here I cook the boys five pounds of butter beans, five pounds of fried okra, smothered pork chops, a special relish, hot water corn bread, and peach cobbler. Sometimes it’s meat loaf, another liver.” I loved the butter beans myself.”

“In 1952, Poodie was voted Most Beautiful Baby in Waco,” Momma Locke proudly boasts. “I never had any problems raising him. When I would go shopping, he would squat down right beside me.”

Poodie has owned the Hilltop Bar and Grill for four years. It is known for the best cheesburgers in the world and great music. You never know who might walk in the door like Tracy Byrd did the other day.  Also, Merle Haggard played there once for 3 1/2 hours for free.

Besides Willie, his favorite all time musician he laughs is Stiffy Williams. Then he says no, it has to be the Eagles.

If he weren’t working for WIllie, he says that he would probably be dead. You would lthink it would be the opposite.

Towards the end of May, Willie’s crew will fly overseas to do 28 shows in 34 days all over Europe. Willie says he plans to stop touring in 15 years, according to Poodie.

There is not going to be a Willie Nelson 4th of July picnic this year, however, Pat Green will be having one at Waterloo Park in Austin. Nice trade off. Bet Poodies there.

Sheryl Bucsanyi

Saturday, May 4th, 2019

Willie Nelson & Family in San Angelo, Texas (8 times in 44 years)

Thursday, May 2nd, 2019

www.SanAngelo.com
by: Matthew McDaniel

Read article, see lots more photos at their website here.

One would be hard-pressed to find a major recording artist who has performed in San Angelo more often than Mr. Willie Nelson.

Willie, as he prefers to be called, first played in town back in 1967, as a fresh-faced country-music artist breaking out of Nashville’s confines to create a new sub-genre of music known as “Outlaw Country.”

According to an item from Page 12B of the May 18 edition of that year, Nelson, a composer-guitarist who hit bestseller lists with “The Party’s Over,” was among several performers who entertained audiences at the San Angelo Coliseum that day.

Willie Nelson first played in San Angelo in May 1967

It’s been almost 52 years since that inaugural San Angelo performance, and during his career, Nelson has recorded an impressive 69 solo records, 29 collaborative albums, a dozen live albums, and 42 compilation albums — in addition to the soundtracks for The Electric Horseman and Honeysuckle Rose motion pictures.

Nelson doesn’t appear to have any plans for going gently into retirement, as he recently celebrated his 86th birthday on April 29, and is releasing a new record soon with a big tour this summer.

The Standard-Times clippings file is barely contained by the little manila envelope, which is bursting at the seams from overcrowding.

A young Rick Smith caught up to Willie in Odessa during a concert in 1975. He talked with the singer about the new direction country music was taking, noting there was a very broad cross section in attendance that night, ranging from young hippies to self-proclaimed rednecks.

Two years later, Nelson was on stage at the San Angelo Coliseum with Dolly Parton, as 2,500 fans cheered for the performers on Jan. 26, 1977.

Willie also made appearances in San Angelo on May 13, 1981; Oct. 30, 1991; April 6, 1997; March 30, 2003; March 12, 2008; and Nov. 17, 2011 — giving him a total of eight San Angelo concerts during a 44-year period.

Willie also made appearances in San Angelo on May 13, 1981; Oct. 30, 1991; April 6, 1997; March 30, 2003; March 12, 2008; and Nov. 17, 2011 — giving him a total of eight San Angelo concerts during a 44-year period.

Nelson has made a lifelong habit of appearing for benefit concerts, including one concert near Mertzon that took two attempts to pull off, as the first date was flooded out by a massive downpour on March 16, 1987, which caused it to be rescheduled to June 8. The event had been organized by famous San Angelo entrepreneur Sam Lewis to benefit two people in need of organ transplants.

Lewis had previously worked with the San Angelo Chamber of Commerce to secure Willie’s presence at a benefit concert for the city of Lima, Ohio, on July 30, 1982.

The two cities became linked by a Wall Street Journal article comparing the two economies side-by-side, which cast San Angelo in a very positive light, while highlighting the Ohio town’s struggles with unemployment, which was above 15 percent at that time.

“Willie was really moved and agreed immediately to do the benefit in Lima,” Lewis told the Standard-Times. “A lot of people don’t know it, but Willie puts on benefits all the time.”

He also appeared at a benefit concert in Big Spring back in 1981 to raise money for a Jaycees-supported college for the handicapped in Gonzales. Nelson is nationally known for his support of Farm Aid through annual concerts going back to 1985.

Nelson’s new album, entitled “Ride Me Back Home,” is set to be released June 21, with two Texas tour dates.


Willie Nelson is on cover of “Freedom Leaf” Magazine (May 2015)

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019
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Willie Nelson is featured in the May 2015 edition of Freedom Leaf, the new magazine of the Marijuana Legalization Company.   The issue includes a preview of Willie Nelson’s new book, “It’s a Long Story:  My Life”

From their website:  www.freedomleaf.com

Freedom Leaf, The Marijuana Legalization Company™ is a multi-media, “movement marketing” business. We cover the latest news, art, fashion, lifestyle, entertainment and the cannabis industry in our print magazine, through social media and on our website.

Our publications are designed to empower a network of activists in the US and around the world. As a result, our brands will be rightly identified with the success of the drive to end marijuana prohibition. We support the two leading non-profits working towards our common goal: NORML; the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and SSDP, Students for Sensible Drug Policy.

We send free copies of our print magazine to the NORML and SSDP chapter network around the country in almost every state that they deliver into the community. Soon we will offer a retail line of “Hemp Inspired™” clothing, apparel and lifestyle products and services. Our publications and products are designed by and for the activists, and other Like-minded individuals making it possible for those involved in this movement to build a career in freedom, marketing Freedom Leaf products and services.

Along with direct fundraising we donate a portion of all of our advertising sales, event sales and other revenues to NORML and SSDP.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2019

Monday, April 29th, 2019

This day in Willie Nelson History: Austin City Limits Hall of Fame (April 26, 2014)

Friday, April 26th, 2019

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The first Austin City Limits Hall of Fame induction ceremony took place April 26, 2014. The Austin City Limits Hall of Fame is located at The Moody Theater and consists of a photo gallery, timeline/anthology mural and an interactive online library of Austin City Limits content.

It’s hard to imagine now, but there was a time when Willie Nelson was not an American icon.

In the early ‘70s, Nelson was best-known for writing hits for other people. The Abbott, Texas native had a successful career as a Nashville songwriter (“Crazy,” “Hello Walls,” “Night Life,” etc.) but had not yet achieved recognition under his own name. In 1974 all that would change. With the release of 1973’s Shotgun Willie and 1974’s Phases and Stages, two imaginative and successful LPs, the stage was set for his career to take off.

Then on October 17, 1974, Willie and his Family band entered Studio 6A to record the pilot for Austin City Limits. Broadcast as part of the national pledge drive in March 1975, the show was one of the top programs on PBS that year, securing a future for ACL as a series.

Willie has appeared on the show 16 times, with six headlining slots (most recently in 2009), seven songwriters specials and three guest appearances with Johnny Rodriguez, Roger Miller and Asleep at the Wheel. Not only is he the artist who launched Austin City Limits, he’s also one of our most frequent – and favorite – guests.

“That man is a natural treasure” — another Willie Nelson fan

Thursday, April 25th, 2019

Jeff Hephner talks about Willie Nelon in Parade Magazine Interview

www.parade.com
by: Riely Haven

Favorite band

“The band of angels that keeps Willie Nelson on tour! National treasure, that man!” — Jeff Hephner

Read entire interview here.

Happy birthday, Micah Nelson

Thursday, April 25th, 2019
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photos: Janis Tillerson

Janis Tillerson took this photo, in Luck, Texas

Micah and his big brother, at Red Rocks.

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Texas Music

November 2014

Micah Nelson: When It Comes to Willie Nelson’s Youngest Son, expect the unexpected
by Steve Uhler

Micah Nelson has been screwing with everyone’s expectations since before he was even born.

His dad originally wanted to name him Jake — a “cowboy name” — but the still-gestating prodigy had other ideas. “Apparently, when my mother was pregnant with me, she had a dream in which I came to her and said, “Hey, listen. I’m gonna be showing up soon, so I want to let you know ahead of time. My name is Micah. You can call me whatever you want, but that’s my name. Micah. OK, great — see you soon.” Then she woke up and turned to my dad and said, ‘Hey, uh… so his name is Micah, apparently.”

“That wasn’t enough convincing, however. “They settled on Jacob, Jake for short,” he continues. “But then I showed up and said my name is Micah. Only doctors and cops and people at the DMV call me Jacob.”

Anyone expecting Willie Nelson’s youngest son to reflect the spitting image of his iconic father is likely to be simultaneously disappointed and amazed. Flying in the face of preconceptions — ore -re-anything — is a lifelong motif for the 24-year-old musician. his music is as similar to his dad’s as John Cage is to Johnny Cash. Same canvas, wildly different colors. “Micah has never followed the herd in anything he odes,” says his older brother, Lukas. “To follow any formula would limit him, which he knows. He’s as unique as he is creative.”

Even as a toddler, Nelson was messing with people’s heads. “I started playing harmonica in my dad’s band when I was about three,” he recalls. “I thought I was just getting harmonica lessons. I was oblivious to the thousands of people watching. My Aunt Robyn asked me if I was nervous in front of all those people? I said, “If I don’t see them, they can’t see me.’ Eventually I got pretty decent at the harmonica, and my dad would throw me the nod to take a solo or two.”

Like his iconoclastic father, Nelson does things his own way — and he does a lot of things. In addition to being a full-time musician, both with his band, Insects vs Robots, and as a solo artist, he’s an accomplished painter, photographer, filmmaker and animator. Imagine H.R. Giger channeling John Audobon at a seance with David Lynch, and you’ll get some idea of Nelson’s vision.

As a musician, he eschews the formulaic and polished in favor of the ragged, unformed and spontaneous. As such a conduit as a creator, Nelson conjures “found sounds” into complex musical works of astonishing depth, imagery and surprising humor. An intuitive sonic forager, he finds inspiration in serendipitous places: the rhythm drip of a leaky faucet, the arthritic, groan of an old rocking chair, the distant howl of hungry coyotes in the night. “When I was in high school, every morning on Maui I’d wake up to the most psychedelic bird calls right outside my window,” he recalls. “the weirdest riffs. A human couldn’t write those melodies. I had a growing suspicion that all birds were just musical robots flying around with little tape decks built into them with old warped tapes that would loop the strangest, tweekiest sounds.”

So do inanimate objects, “I know a guy named Lewellyn with an old creaky rusty cat,” he continues. “Every time he opens his door it sings the strangest creaky melodies. I”ve ripped his car’s riffs off countless times. Sometimes I see music as this mysterious forest to be explored. Or like archeaology. You never know what treasures and artifacts you might find, but you can’t know unless you start digging.”

Nelson meticulously builds layers of tracks, weaving a tapestry of songs that are often otherworldly. Anyone expecting echoes of his dad’s distinctive voice and mainstream op sensibilities will find Nelson’s oeuvre disorienting. It’s a beguiling mash-up of traditional folk, psychedelia and world beat, peppered with guileless vocals, dissonant chordings and shifting time signatures. It’s musical Chaos Theory.

“A lot of popular music is so safe, so predictable, like it was processed in a factory,” he explains. “You can literally go in and buy it at Target next to the Tupperware. Not that there’s anything wrong with that .. except that a lot of it tends to sound like Tupperware. Some folks want ot make a pop hit that sells deodorant and plays every five minutes at Walgreens and gets them a Super Bowl halftime show. I tend to get bored with that intention. It spooks my horse.” Perhaps the closest he’s ever come to a traditional love song is “Mosquito,” his bizarre ode to the pesky insect.

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http://store.txmusic.com/Departments/TxM-Back-Issues.aspx?sortorder=2&page=4