Archive for the ‘Waylon Jennings’ Category

Willie & Waylon: Outlaws & Armadillos

Saturday, August 25th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings: Music City News (August, 1995)

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018

Willie & Waylon – “From Outlaws to Good Guys”
Music City News
August 1995
by Lydia Dixon Harden

Together and alone, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson stand tall in the eyes of country music fans.  They each stepped out of the mainstream of country music to put their own indelible brand to the genre — Waylon’s music with its walking bass and his growling voice; Willie with his unique phrasing and trademark guitar licks.

In 1970s, the two teamed together for a series of duets which fused their long-standing friendship.  They urged people to “get back to the basics of love” and extolled the virtues of a good hearted woman.  They have been tagged as outlaws, but in reality, they are also good hearted.  Willie has raised more than $12 million for American farmers.  Waylon has made adult literacy his cause.  For all their efforts through the years, each earned an honor during this year’s TNN Music City News Country Awards.

Now Waylon and Willie will work again this summer with Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson as the Highwaymen.  The foursome released their third Highwayman collaboration in the past ten years.

Individually, Willie is making plans for another Farm Aid and has released a new album for Justice Records, “Just One Love,” and Rhino Records is releasing “A Classic & Unreleased Collection.” Waylon is still writing songs and working to follow-up his “Waymore’s blues Part II” album.

Music City News took time to catch up with these two busy artists during the TNN Music City News Country Awards.

Willie Nelson

‘I love Minnie Pearl to death,” says Willie about the woman for whom his award was named.  “She is a wonderful person and we have been friends for many, many years.  I was a big fan before I ever met her.  But then through the years, we became great friends.  This is a great award, and especially great because of Minnie Pearl.”

Willie was chosen for the honor due to his efforts with Farm Aid.  “We are talking about doing another Farm Aid, maybe in September.  I have heard Louisville mentioned a couple of times.  We’ll see.  I never thought we would have to do more than one,” he adds.  “I figured that maybe once people realized, that something would be done.  This is the tenth anniversary and things are worse now than they were, what with the environmental disasters like floods and those things.  It’s pretty bad out there.  The situation started out as one thing and now it has grown into another.  Now farm aid is trying to help all those people who are going through all those different disasters much at the same time as their farm problems. Now they have all these environmental problems.’

Willie Nelson has a global outlook when it comes to his music.  He and his band recently returned from Europe.  The trip covered 23 cities in 12 countries in a span of 25 days.

‘It was a whirlwind tour, but a good one,” he says.  “There are a lot of fans over there.  I have been several times and each time I go back.  it seems to be growing a little bit more.”

Closer to home, Nelson has his own recording studio.  One of the real benefits of that is he gets to hear what other musicians are up to.  He was pleasantly surprised when he came home one day to find the members of his first band laying down tracks.  Willie joined in and they recorded a whole bunch of material.

“The Offenders is the name of the group that I first put together,” he tells.  “We went on the road and for some reason we decided to call ourselves the Offenders.  Johnny Bush, who has gone on to have a lot of record sales and hits on his own, played drums for me back then.  David Zettner played the bass and Jimmy Day played steel guitar.  I came home a few weeks ago and those guys were in the studio just recording this song.  We wound up doing a lot of the older songs and a couple of new things.  I’m trying to sell it to somebody.”

That project will be put to the back burner now that the Highwaymen tour is under full swing.  Does he think the Highwaymen concept would work with four other people?

“Would it work with any other configuration?  I didn’t think it would work with us!” he laughs.

“It is one of those miracles again.  Fortunately, we are not in control.  Each time it comes together, it is another miracle because we all come in from so many different directions.  But it is a good thing,” he states.  “Whether it could happen again with anybody else, I am sure it could.  There are four people around somewhere, I am sure, that they can get along a little while on the road. We get along amazingly well.

“It is a vacation for me.  I stand over there three-quarters of the time and listen to these guys sing and listen to a great band and usually a full house.  So I get to be entertained.  The rest of the time, I get to entertain.  So I am having a big time.  It is not work.  All I have to do is show up.”

Waylon and Willie due at ChicagoFest (August 9 1979)

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018

chicagofest

Two big stars for ChicagoFest will be country music singers Waylon Jennings on August 8 and Wiie Nelson on Aug. 9.  Willie, who likes only Southern cooking, is bringing his own chuckwagon and chef.  Joe drives the chuckwagon with his motorhome behind it.    The rock group Kiss will perform at the international Amphitheater on Sept. 22.

 

Willie and Waylon on Music City News (August 1995)

Saturday, August 4th, 2018

Willie & Waylon – “From Outlaws to Good Guys”
Music City News
August 1995
by Lydia Dixon Harden

Together and alone, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson stand tall in the eyes of country music fans.  They each stepped out of the mainstream of country music to put their own indelible brand to the genre — Waylon’s music with its walking bass and his growling voice; Willie with his unique phrasing and trademark guitar licks.

In 1970s, the two teamed together for a series of duets which fused their long-standing friendship.  They urged people to “get back to the basics of love” and extolled the virtues of a good hearted woman.  They have been tagged as outlaws, but in reality, they are also good hearted.  Willie has raised more than $12 million for American farmers.  Waylon has made adult literacy his cause.  For all their efforts through the years, each earned an honor during this year’s TNN Music City News Country Awards.

Now Waylon and Willie will work again this summer with Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson as the HIghwaymen.  The foursome released their third Highwayman collaboration in the past ten years.

Individually, Willie is making plans for another Farm Aid and has released a new album for Justice Records, “Just One Love,” and Rhino Records is releasing “A Classic & Unreleased Collection.” Waylon is still writing songs and working to follow-up his “Waymore’s blues Part II” album.

Music City News took time to catch up with these two busy artists during the TNN Music City News Country Awards.

Willie Nelson

‘I love Minnie Pearl to death,” says Willie about the woman for whom his award was named.  “She is a wonderful person and we have been friends for many, many years.  I was a big fan before I ever met her.  But then through the years, we became great friends.  This is a great award, and especially great because of Minnie Pearl.”

Willie was chosen for the honor due to his efforts with Farm Aid.  “We are talking about doing another Farm Aid, maybe in September.  I have heard Louisville mentioned a couple of times.  We’ll see.  I never thought we would have to do more than one,” he adds.  “I figured that maybe once people realized, that something would be done.  This is the tenth anniverary and things are worse now than they were, what with the environemental disasters like floods and those things.  It’s pretty bad out there.  The situation started out as one thing and now it has grown into another.  Now farm aid is trying to help all those peole who are going through all those different disasters much at the same time as their farm problems. Now they have all these environmental problems.’

Willie Nelson has a global outlook when it comes to his music.  He and his band recently returned from Europe.  The trip covered 23 cities in 12 countries in a span of 25 days.

‘It was a whirlwind tour, but a good one,” he says.  “There are a lot of fans over there.  I have been several times and each time I go back.  it seems to be growing a little bit more.”

Closer to home, Nelson has his own recording studio.  One of the real benefits of that is he gets to hear what other musicians are up to.  He was pleasantly surprised when he came home one day to find the members of his first band laying down tracks.  Willie joined in and they recorded a whole bunch of material.

“The Offenders is the name of the group that I first put together,” he tells.  “We went on the road and for some reason we decided to call ourselves the Offenders.  Johnny Bush, who has gone on to have a lot of record sales and hits on his own, played drums for me back then.  David Zettner played the bass and Jimmy Day played steel guitar.  I came home a few weeks ago and those guys were in the studio just recording this song.  We woujnd up doing a lot of the older songs and a couple of new things.  I’m trying to sell it to somebody.”

That project will be put to the back burner now that the Highwaymen tour is under full swing.  Does he think the Highwaymen concept would work with four other people?

“Would it work with any other configuration?  I didn’t think it would work with us!” he laughs.

“It is one of those miracles again.  Fortunately, we are not in control.  Each time it comes together, it is another miracle because we all come in from so many different directions.  But it is a good thing,” he states.  “Whether it could happen again with anybody else, I am sure it could.  There are four people around somewhere, I am sure, that they can get along a little while on the road. We get along amazingly well.

“It is a vacation for me.  I stand over there three-quarters of the time and listen to these guys sing and listen to a great band and usually a full house.  So I get to be entertianed.  The rest of the time, I get to entertain.  So I am having a big time.  It is not work.  All I have to do is show up.”

“Live Forever” — The Highwaymen

Friday, July 27th, 2018

Willie Nelson & Waylon Jennings (together again for the first time)

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Lee Ann Womack and others perform at “Outlaw: Celebrating the Music of Waylon Jennings” (July 6, 2015)

Friday, July 6th, 2018

outlawsw

Leon Russell, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson’s 4th of July Picnic (1974)

Thursday, June 28th, 2018

“I’m Gonna Live Forever” — The Highwaymen

Sunday, June 3rd, 2018

Red Rocks ’76 (Willie Nelson/Waylon Jennings/ Flying Burrito Brothers (June 1st)

Friday, June 1st, 2018

MariaMatteraredrocks76

Tickets: $6.00

Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings

Friday, May 18th, 2018

Bicentennial Outlaw Concert (Sept. 10, 1976)

Tuesday, April 10th, 2018

Waylon & Willie, “Just to Satisfy You”

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

The Highwaymen, “Me and Bobby McGee”

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, “Sitting on the Dock of the Bay”

Friday, March 16th, 2018

In 1982, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings took their version of the Otis Redding classic, “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,” to the country charts.

www.RollingStone.com
by: Stephen L. Betts

R&B singer Otis Redding played California’s Monterey Pop Festival in the middle of 1967’s hippie-and-flower-powered “Summer of Love,” he was one of only two soul singers to perform at the three-day festival. The event would be a turning point in Redding’s career, expanding his fan base to include white audiences throughout the U.S. and Europe. California would play a major role in the single that would become his biggest solo hit, an enduring R&B-pop classic which hit Number One 50 years ago today and has since been covered by dozens of artists, including a legendary pair of country outlaws. Redding, however, would not live to experience its success or its enduring legacy.

Days after the festival ended, Redding was on rock promoter Bill Graham’s houseboat, which was docked in Waldo Point Harbor in Sausalito, California. From the boat, looking out at Richardson Bay (not the more poetic-sounding “Frisco Bay” as depicted in the lyrics), Redding began writing the first verse to the tune that would become his signature song. Songwriter-musician Steve Cropper, guitarist with Stax Records house band Booker T. & the M.G.’s, co-wrote “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay” with Redding, but when the musicians went into the studio in late November of 1967 to cut it, the end result represented a stylistic change for Redding, veering into mellow, yet sophisticated, pop territory.

In early December, Redding and his backing band the Bar-Kays flew to Nashville for the first of three scheduled shows that weekend. On the morning of December 10th, Redding and all but two of the Bar-Kays were killed when their twin-engine plane plummeted into Lake Monona, just three minutes from their destination in Madison, Wisconsin. Redding was 26 years old.

“(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay” was released in January 1968 and would become the first posthumous single to top Billboard‘s Hot 100, ascending to Number One on March 16th and holding the top spot for four consecutive weeks. Other contemporaneous versions, by King Curtis and Latin-flavored band Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66, were minor hits, while artists including Cher, Peggy Lee and Glen Campbell also covered it at the time. Others who have cut it include David Allan Coe and Garth Brooks.