Archive for the ‘You Tube, Vimeo’ Category

Kenny Chesney, Willie Nelson, “That Lucky Ole Sun”

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Paula Nelson, “Angel from Montgomery” (on ‘Lucky 13’ album)

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Billy Bob’s Saloon le 11.3.11 avec une chanson de John Prine qui figure sur le 3eme CD “Lucky 13”

songs:
Fire Below
Standing Tall
Day to Day Love
Every Now and Then
Baby You’re Mean
Angel From Montgomery
Surrender
Bein’ Alone
Overboard
Find Your Way
Easy Money
Only You
Jackson

Paula Nelson: Vocals, Landis Armstrong: Guitar/ Vocals, George Devore: Acoustic Guitar/ Vocals, Matthew Hubbard: Keyboards/ Harmonica/ Vocals, Chris Johnson: Bass, Kevin Remme: Drums/ Vocals

Paula Nelson’s ‘Lucky 13’ album is such great listening.  If you don’t have it, you should.  You can get it on amazon, cdbaby, iTunes.  Here’s the Texas Monthly’s original review of the album:

She may have a famous name and famous father but Paula Nelson’s music and voice stands tall on its own. If anyone had any doubt, her new project Lucky 13 will soothe the most hardened of music critics. Let’s face it, sometimes talent is in the genes, and Paula has obviously gotten a good amount of whom and what her father is musically. However, she is not Willie light or really even Willie-ish. She has her own style and is different. In some of the guitar parts of Lucky 13 it is obvious that Willie’s fingers are on the frets but other than that this record is pure Paula.

Paula ranges from Blues to Beatles on Lucky 13 and the result is a fun musical ride with a little yodel mixed with jazz, blues, country, and kick butt rock and roll. Paula penned ten of the thirteen tracks and two of the covers are duets with vocal and musical star George Devore. The two collaborate on John Prine’s “Angel from Montgomery” and the June Carter and John Cash made famous Billy Wheeler and Jerry Leiber written “Jackson.” In both duets Devore and Paula’s voice match up perfectly. Those two tracks alone are worth the price of the CD and more. Devore can also be heard in many of the arrangements with his silky acoustic guitar work.

The absolute greatest joy of Lucky 13 is Paula’s keyboard work. She is a player of rare talent. The Keys are an instrument not used enough in Texas music but Paula’s uses them with masterful elegance. Keyboards are almost the backbone of Lucky 13. They are what make the record so different and unique. Use of the various keys allow Paula to move effortlessly through the genres while the listener is graced with audible nuggets and treats that keep them listening for more.

In addition to the duets with Devore the most notable tracks on the CD are “Fire Below,” “Baby You’re Mean,” “Find Your Way,” “Standing Tall,” and “Day to Day Love.” In all Paula Nelson delivers her own individual treat of a record in Lucky 13. At times it is more like Delbert (McClinton) than Willie but nevertheless it is a kick butt fun record and stands all on its own with or without a famous name. A must have.

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Beer for my Horses” wins Video of Year Award (5/26/2004)

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

On May 26, 2004, music video to Toby Keith and Willie Nelson song, ‘Beer For My Horses’ wins best video award at CBS’ 39th annual Academy of Country Music Awards at Las Vegas’ Mandalay Bay.

Country Weekly
October 14, 2003
by Chris Neal

Like a lot of great country music tales, this one begins with whiskey. Willie Nelson and Toby Keith were on Willie’s bus, passing the bottle back and forth — to be precise, a bottle of Willie’s own signature brand, Old Whiskey River. They were having fun, but Toby had a serious question for his hero.

“I’ve got a project I’d love to talk to you about,” he offered. “It’s singing the second verse on a song that I think fits you like a glove.”

“What’s the name of it?” asked Willie. “Whiskey for My Men; Beer for My Horses,” replied Toby.

“Hell, let’s go cut it!” Willie exclaimed with a laugh. “It’d be hard to have a bad song with a title that good.”

Many months later, Willie’s judgment turned out to be right on. “Beer for My Horses” shot to No. 1 and stayed there for six weeks.

“Johnny Cash said one time that all that’s wrong with any of us can be cured with a No. 1 song,” said Willie. “And I think he was about right. I’m almost cured of everything.”

The ride actually began many years ago, way back in mid-Sept. 1976. Toby, then 15, made his way backstage when Willie was appearing in concert at the Lloyd Noble Center in Norman, Okla., as part of an “Outlaws” tour with Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser.

At the time, Toby already idolized Willie, who was then riding high with the No. 1 Waylon duet “Good Hearted Woman” – a song Toby himself would sing with Willie months after Waylon’s death in 2002.

Toby still remembers meeting Willie that night, 27 years ago. “He was his usual polite self,” he smiles. “Willie is a real sweetheart. He takes care of everybody and wants everybody to have a piece of him.”

By the time they met again in the ‘90’s, Toby had followed in Willie’s footsteps to become a star himself. It happened that Toby’s guitarist, Joey Floyd, had played the part of Willie’s son in the 1980 movie Honeysuckle Rose, and still kept in touch. Joey made the introductions — and Toby and Willie’s friendship was off and running.

“I’d already heard his music before I met him,” recalls Willie. “I think he’s a great talent. He’s one of those guys coming along — well, I don’t know how young he is. Younger than me for damn sure.” (Toby is 42.)

“Probably the thing that ties us together most is the music,” says Toby. “But he’s got a great sense of humor, and so do I. We call each other all the time and tell our latest jokes, and we really have a good time when we’re hanging out.”

Perhaps the most notorious occasion the two spent “hanging out” was during this year’s ACM Awards. Tongues wagged after Toby was named entertainer of the Year at the evening’s end, but wasn’t around to accept it because he’d already left.

Where was he?

“I was up in my room, at the same hotel where the show was going on,” explains Willie. “I was watching it on TV. Next thing you know, there’s a knock on my door and there’s Toby. He said, “Hell, I ain’t gonna win.” I said, ‘OK, come in here and we’ll write a song or something.” So we got the whiskey bottle going around — again — and we were having some fun.”

“You can tell when it’s your night,” explains Toby, “And it didn’t feel like it was my night.”

So Toby figured that spending time with his friend and idol sounded better than waiting around to not win an award.

“That’s important to me, getting a chance to enjoy some of the stuff I grew up wanting to do,” he says. “But I did feel real bad when they said my name and “Entertainer of the Year.”

There’s always the upcoming CMAs, where “Beer for My Horses” is nominated for Single, Song, Vocal Event — and Music Video of the Year, for it’s imaginative clip featuring Willie and Toby as father and son police detectives chasing a killer.

The two are lining up tour dates together, including a New Year’s Eve show. Willie is currently making a new album with Toby’s producer, which will include at least one song Toby wrote. And both men say they’re reading and willing to duet again.

“I’ve had a lot of fun singing with Toby,” declares Willie. “He’s one of us.”

But one question remains: Do horses really like beer?

“Good God yeah” says Willie. “It’s got wheat, barley, corn — why wouldn’t a horse like it? It’s horse soup.”

Willie Nelson, “Always on My Mind”

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

In 1982, Willie Nelson’s album, “Always on My Mind”, and recording of title song, were #1 on Billboard Country Music Charts.

Willie Nelson & Family at the Pavillion, in Charlottesville, VA

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

www.newsplex.com
by: Kelsey Summer

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA  — Willie Nelson is bringing six decades of music to the Sprint Pavilion. Kelsey Summer was live Downtown as fans flocked in to see the icon take the stage.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA (NEWSPLEX) — Kelsey Summer was Downtown at the Sprint Pavilion where a legend was taking the stage. Willie Nelson’s career has spanned six decades. He’s won seven Grammys and numerous other awards. While the icon is most notably known for his music and songwriting, he also has a hand in a few other areas, including poetry, writing, and activism.

Nelson’s activism is playing a key role in Wednesday’s performance. The concert is in support of The Local Food Hub whose “mission is to partner with Virginia farmers to increase community access to local food.”

Bobbie Wilinski, a Nelson fan, says, “Farming is very, very important, and it doesn’t get the attention it needs, so I’m glad he’s supporting that…. Great guy, great music.”

Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016
willmerle

“Loving Her Was Easier” — The Highwaymen (Scotland) (1992)

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Happy 75th Birthday, Bob Dylan

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan, “Pancho and Lefty”

Willie Nelson with Jimmy and Rosylyn Carter at Chastain Park (Atlanta, GA)

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

The Message of the Highwaymen

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

highwaypbs

www.pbs.org

Director and producer Jim Brown talks about the making of The Highwaymen: Friends Til The End, his admiration for the musicians’ camaraderie, passion for music and having a clear purpose in their careers. American Masters — The Highwaymen: Friends Til The Endpremieres nationwide Friday, May 27, 2016, at 9/8c on PBS (check local schedule) as part of the 30th anniversary season of THIRTEEN’s American Masters series, exploring how these men came together and the fruits of their historic collaboration.

This day in Willie Nelson history, “Just to Satisfy You” (with Waylon Jennings) #1 (May 21, 1982)

Saturday, May 21st, 2016

President and Mrs. Carter sing with Willie Nelson & Family in Georgia

Saturday, May 21st, 2016

www.wsbtv.com
by:  Kimberly Richardson

 

Only 20 minutes into his set, Willie Nelson had already rolled through eight songs.  Delivering them with lean musicianship and the occasional mischievous grin, the 83-year-old musician was a model of stamina Friday night as he unfurled crowd favorites “Whiskey Rose,” “Still is Still Moving to Me,” “Beer for My Horses,” “On the Road Again” and “Always on My Mind” practically without pausing for a breath.

Mirroring Nelson in the endurance department was former President Jimmy Carter, who arrived at Chastain Park Amphitheatre a couple of songs into opener Kris Kristofferson’s performance with wife Rosalynn and a handful of casually dressed Secret Service men in tow.

Carter is an avowed Nelson fan, and he and Rosalynn were spotted standing throughout most of the Red Headed Stranger’s set, front row, stage left. When Nelson launched into a concert staple, his rendition of “Georgia on My Mind,” a spotlight caught the Carters smiling and singing along.

Along with the presidential couple, about 6,500 other fans tolerated the misty rain that persisted all evening – but not many seemed eager to leave once Nelson hit the stage, clad in black and waving his two arms overhead in greeting.

Nelson’s singing has always been more about character than technicality, so in that sense, his adenoidal tone hasn’t changed. But his spoke-sung delivery of most songs indicated his impatience to get to the good part for him – the guitar playing.

Nelson’s instrument was turned up a bit high in the mix and sometimes he played a step off the beat but always fell back into the groove provided by Billy English on his snare drum – yep, no kit, just a single drum – and bassist Bee Spears.

Harmonicist Mickey Raphael stayed busy on every song, while Nelson’s sister Bobbie added texture to “Always on My Mind” with her expert piano playing.

In addition to playing a generous set of songs from his 50-plus year career, Nelson asked fans, “What about some Hank Williams?” Before they could respond with a whoop, Nelson was halfway through the first verse of “Jambalaya (on the Bayou).”

During a jam in the song, Nelson edged toward English, swapped his black cowboy hat for a trademark red bandanna (he tossed several into the crowd throughout his set) and segued seamlessly into Williams’ “Hey Good Lookin’” and “Move it On Over.”

The memory of Waylon Jennings was conjured as well with “Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys” (Jennings and Nelson earned a No. 1 with their 1978 duet).

Nelson continued his rapid-fire blast of hits with “Shoeshine Man” and the song he said used to close his sets “100 years ago” – the aptly titled “The Party’s Over.”

After singing “Funny How Time Slips Away” with a wistful tinge to his voice, Nelson dovetailed into “Crazy,” which included some rough swipes at his guitar that morphed into a thoughtful solo.

When Nelson’s Chastain concert was announced earlier this year, he was set to share the bill with Merle Haggard.

After Haggard’s death last month,  Nelson pal Kristofferson stepped in to fill the opening slot, along with Haggard’s sons, Ben and Noel.

Backed by Kristofferson’s band, The Strangers, the front threesome alternated at the mic between Haggard classics (“I’m a Lonesome Fugitive” sung by Noel in a smooth country tenor and “Workin’ Man Blues,” handled adeptly by Ben, were standouts) and Kristofferson classics.

At this point, one goes to see Kristofferson to bask in his legacy, not listen to his voice, which vacillated between gruff mumbling on “Me and Bobby McGee” (which he penned in the late-‘60s) and a strained warble on “Sunday Morning Coming Down” and “Why Me.”

The Haggard boys and the band, though, sounded sturdy throughout.

Haggard even received an extra moment of remembrance when, during “Okie from Muskogee,” Noel missed his second verse cue, looked upward and joked, “Sorry, dad.”

He likely wasn’t the only one thinking of Merle at that moment.

Willie Nelson, “Turn Out the Lights (the Party’s Over)”

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Willie Nelson and Toby Keith, “Whiskey For My Men (and Beer for My Horses)

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash, “I Still Miss Someone”

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016