Archive for the ‘You Tube, Vimeo’ Category

Willie Nelson, “There’s Nothing I Can Do About it Now”

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Wanted the Outlaws” goes douple platinum (January 21, 1985)

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

on January 21, 1985: “Wanted: The Outlaws,” featuring Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser, certifies double-platinum, along with the “Waylon & Willie” album.

In 1976, the album was the first country album to receive the new platinum certification, signifying one million units shipped.

wanted

  1. My Heroes Have Always
  1. My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys (Waylon)
  2. Honky Tonk Heroes (Waylon)
  3. I’m Looking for Blue Eyes (Jessi)
  4. Suspicious Minds (Waylon and Jessi)
  5. Good Hearted Woman (Waylon and Willie)
  6. Heaven or Hell (Waylon and Willie
  7. Me and Paul (Willie)
  8. Yesterday’s Wine (Willie
  9. T for Texas (Tompall)
  10. Put Another Log on the Fire (Tompall)

It’s unfortunate that there still has to be a sampler, or primer, or golden book of some of the best singers working anywhere, but apparently not everyone has gotten the message yet. Maybe this album can introduce you to some people you would have liked to have known sooner but just didn’t have the opportunity to meet.

These are some special people, very special. They’ve been waiting in the wings for years, too many years, to assume their proper places in the structure of American Music. When it became apparent to them that their proper places were perhaps being unduly delayed becasue of certain resentments harbored against them because of their real and imagined unconventionality, they — by God — decided to take matters into their own hands. There resulted a rather difficult period of figurative doors being smashed and general confusion and namecalling in Nashville. When the smoke cleared and the fallout returned to earth, there was effected a major shift in country music. “Progressive Country” (for want of a better term) was on the map, and was here for good. And these are the people responsibile for that. Call them outlaws, call them innovators, call them revolutionaries, call them what you will. They’re just some damned find people who are also some of the most gifted songwriters and singers anywhere.

They are musical rebels, in one sense, in that they challenged the accepted way of doing things. Like all pioneers, they were criticized for that but time has vindicated them.

Tompall Glaser was one of the first in Nashville to chart his own musical course and it was lonely for him for years but now he is beginning to receive the recognition due him.

Waylon Jennings, as the most visible of the progressive country pack, has been quietly fighting for years in his own way for acceptance. Both he and Jessi Colter (who, coincidentally is also known as Mrs. Waylon Jennings) were authentically ahead of thier time. Now, the times have caught up with them.

That streak of rugged individualism that is the unifying bond for these musical outlaws is nowhere more evident than in Willie Nelson’s life and times. Unquestionably one of the finest songwriters who ever lived, Willie was known for years only to other writers and to a slowly growing cult of followers. All that has changed now. “Miracles appear in the strangest of places,” Willie sings in Yesterday’s Wine,” one of my favorites from his collection of remarkable songs, and that’s true. When I first started keeping track of Willie and Waylon and Jessi and Tompall, I (along with their other cult followers) felt almost responsible for them since they weren’t that well known to the public and the music industry as a whole didn’t like to acknowledge them. They didn’t wear Nudie suits and thier music didn’t confirm to the country norm of songs of divorce and alcohol and life’s other little miseries. The only thing that worried me was that I knew these people were born scrappers and really loved fighting for acceptance. What would happen to them, I wondered, when they inevitably won (as I knew they would)? Would they like so many who struggle just for the sake of the struggle, grow fat and lazy when they grew successful?

There was no need to worry. This last year each of them has gotten better, writing better, and singing with breathtaking confidence.

They’re the cutting edge of a brand of American music that I find the most satisfying development in popular music in the past decade. It’s not country and it’s not country-rock, but there’s no real need to worry about labeling it. It’s just damned good music that’s true and honest and you can’t ask for more than that.

Chet Flippo
Associate Editor
Rolling Stone

Willie Nelson, “Family Bible”

Saturday, January 20th, 2018

Willie Nelson, Live from Austin, Texas, “Bloody Mary Morning”

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

From the Willie Nelson album ‘Live from Austin, TX’ available on CD, DVD and 180g vinyl:
https://www.livefromaustintx.com/

Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, “Sunday Morning Coming Down”

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson performed at all-star tribute concert to Kristofferson, at the Life & Songs of Kris Kristofferson tribute concert that took place in Nashville on March 16, 2016.

“Why Me Lord” — Willie Nelson and friends

Monday, January 15th, 2018

“Why Me Lord” by Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Alison Krauss, Reba McEntire, Lady Antebellum, Jon Randall, Larry Gatlin, Jessi Alexander, Jessi Colter, Jack Ingram, Buddy Miller, Martina McBride, Ryan Bingham, Lee Ann Womack, Jennifer Nettles, Rosanne Cash, Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Dierks Bentley & The Travelin’ McCourys, Darius Rucker, Jamey Johnson, Hank Williams, Jr., Eric Church & Shooter Jennings

Willie Nelson receives Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song

Sunday, January 14th, 2018

Willie Nelson, “I Woke Up Still Not Dead Again Today”

Saturday, January 13th, 2018

Willie Nelson sings with Judy Collins, “When I Go”

Friday, January 12th, 2018

judy

www.JudyCollins.com

July Collins will release a new duets album on September 18th, Strangers Again.  The album  is a collection of duets with some of her favorite male artists, including Willie Nelson, Don McLean, Michael McDonald, Jeff Bridges and Jackson Browne.

“They are guys that I adore, admire and respect,” says the Seattle-born folk singer and songwriter, 76, who has performed works by some of the greatest, including Pete Seeger and Bob Dylan. “Some of them I’ve dreamed of singing with.”

On ‘Strangers Again’ Judy revisits “Send In The Clowns” with Don McLean, a song she first recorded in 1975 and helped to etch her name into the firmament of American icons. “Such fun to finally have some company after singing it alone for all these years!” she says. When Judy asked Jeff Bridges to sing with her, she was delighted that he chose Leonard Bernstein’s “Makes Our Garden Grow,” from ‘Candide.’

Judy is perhaps one of the best-suited singers to record “Hallelujah” given her long history with Leonard Cohen (she was one of the first to record his work), and does so on the album with rising star Bhi Bhiman. She’s also joined by Thomas Dybdahl, Ari Hest and Academy Award-winner Glen Hansard, interpreting songs penned by each.

‘Strangers Again’ track list:
1) Strangers Again (with Ari Hest)
2) Miracle River (Michael McDonald)
3) When I Go (Willie Nelson)
4) From Grace (Thomas Dybdahl)
5) Feels Like Home (Jackson Browne)
6) Make Our Garden Grow (Jeff Bridges)
7) Belfast to Boston (Marc Cohn)
8 ) Stars in my Eyes (Aled Jones)
9) Hallelujah (Bhi Bhiman)
10) Send in the Clowns (Don Mclean)
11) Some Day Soon (Jimmy Buffett)
12) Races (Glen Hansard)

Willie Nelson, “You Don’t Know Me”

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

Willie Nelson featured in “Outlaws and Armadillos” exhibit at Country Music Hall of Fame (opens May 25, 2018)

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

www.CountryMusicHallofFame.org

Willie Nelson. Waylon Jennings. Kris Kristofferson. Jessi Colter. Bobby Bare. Jerry Jeff Walker. David Allan Coe. Cowboy Jack Clement. Tom T. Hall. Billy Joe Shaver. Guy Clark. Townes Van Zandt. Tompall Glaser. Today, all names synonymous with the word “outlaw,” but 40 years ago they started a musical revolution by creating music and a culture that shook the status quo on Music Row and cemented their place in country music history and beyond.

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum’s upcoming major exhibition, Outlaws & Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s, will explore this era of cultural and artistic exchange between Nashville, Tenn., and Austin, Texas, revealing untold stories and never-seen artifacts. The exhibition, which opens May 25 for a nearly three-year run, will explore the complicated, surprising relationship between the two cities.

While the smooth Nashville Sound of the late 1950s and ’60s was commercially successful, some artists, such as Nelson and Jennings, found the Music Row recording model creatively stifling. By the early 1970s, those artists could envision a music industry in which they would write, sing and produce their own music. At the same time, Austin was gaining national attention as a thriving music center with a countercultural outlook. Musicians of varying stripes migrated to Austin, where the disparate strains of country, bluegrass, folk, blues, rock, and conjunto blended to create a unique environment hosted by music–friendly venues such as the Armadillo World Headquarters, Broken Spoke, Soap Creek Saloon and Antone’s.

“Outlaws & Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s offers an unprecedented look at some of the most compelling music and artists in music history,” said museum CEO Kyle Young. “This was an era in which renegades Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson fought for and won creative control of their own songs and sounds. It was a time when melodic poets Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt and Billy Joe Shaver elevated public perception of what a country song could be. It was a time when the Austin, Texas, music and arts scenes blossomed, and when characters like singer-songwriter Jerry Jeff Walker, Hondo Crouch (who bought his own town, Luckenbach, Texas), armadillo art specialist Jim Franklin and University of Texas football coach Darrell Royal changed Lone Star culture. At the time, some of these things seemed unusual, even insane. Now, they all seem essential to any understanding of this great American art form, country music.”

Read more here.

?

Remembering Poodie Locke

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

“This is a memorial to Poodie Locke, Willie Nelson’s Stage Manager forever. I was filming a TV show when he passed away. He will be missed.”

Tony Dell’Abate-Realtor

This day in Willie Nelson history: “Stardust” certified quadruple-platinum (January 9, 1990)

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

On January 9th, 1990, Willie Nelson’s “Stardust” album was certified quadruple-platinum.

1. Stardust
2. Georgia on My Mind
3. Blue Skies
4. All of Me
5. Unchained Melody
6. September Song
7. On the Sunny Side of the Street
8. Moonlight in Vermont
9. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
10. Someone to Watch over Me
11. Scarlett Ribbons
12. I Can See Clearly Now

Willie Nelson and Paula Nelson, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

Willie Nelson, “God’s Problem Child”

Sunday, January 7th, 2018

1. Little House On The Hill (Lyndel Rhodes)
2. Old Timer (Donnie Fritz / Lenny LeBlanc)
3. True Love (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
4. Delete And Fast Forward (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
5. A Woman’s Love (Mike Reid / Sam Hunter)
6. Your Memory Has A Mind Of Its Own (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
7. Butterfly (Sonny Throckmorton / Mark Sherrill)
8. Still Not Dead (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
9. God’s Problem Child (Jamey Johnson / Tony Joe White)
10. It Gets Easier (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
11. Lady Luck (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
12. I Made A Mistake (Willie Nelson / Buddy Cannon)
13. He Won’t Ever Be Gone (Gary Nicholson)