Congratulations, Johnny Gimble, 2018 Inductee into Country Music Hall of Fame

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Ricky Skaggs, Dottie West and Johnny Gimble achieved country music’s greatest honor on Tuesday morning when they were announced as this year’s inductees into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

The emotional event, hosted by Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood, was held in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum‘s rotunda, where plaques commemorating the Hall’s 133 previous inductees adorn the walls.

The Class of 2018, which was selected by an anonymous panel of industry leaders assembled by the CMA, will officially be inducted into the Hall of Fame during a medallion ceremony in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s CMA Theater later this year.

In 1949, he began playing with the king of Western Swing, Bob Wills, as part of his Texas Playboys band; three years later, Gimble fiddled on Marty Robbins’ debut single, “I’ll Go on Alone,” which topped the country charts.

He moved to Nashville in the late 1960s. In Music City, he was an in-demand session player. He appeared on now-classic recordings like Connie Smith’s “If It Ain’t Love,” Merle Haggard’s “If We Make It Through December,” Chet Atkins’ 1974 album “Superpickers” and George Strait’s version of “Right or Wrong.”

Over his 60-plus years in music, Gimble won two Grammys for his work with Western Swing outfit Asleep at the Wheel, five Instrumentalist of the Year Awards from the Country Music Association and Fiddler of the Year Awards from the Academy of Country Music. In 1994, he was awarded a prestigious National Heritage Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Arts.

He appeared multiple times on “A Prairie Home Companion” and “Austin City Limits. In 2010, released his final album “Celebrating with Friends,” a collection of collaborations with artists like Nelson, Haggard, Ray Benson, Dale Watson, Vince Gill and others.

Gimble died May 9, 2015 at the age of 88.

His son, Dick, and granddaughter Emily performed Gimble’s jaunty “Under the ‘X’ in Texas” in his memory during the induction announcement. Daughter Cyndy paraphrased her father: “The money, the awards, that stuff’s nice. But the magic, that’s what keeps you playing. That’s what never wears off.”

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https://www.tennessean.com/story/entertainment/music/2018/03/27/country-music-hall-fame-reveals-class-2018/431755002/

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