Posts Tagged ‘Willie Nelson’

Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

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On January 8, 2008, Blue Note Records released, “Two Men With the Blues”

Willie Nelson – vocals and guitar Wynton Marsalis – trumpet and vocals Mickey Raphael – harmonica Walter Blanding – saxophone Dan Nimmer – piano Carlos Henriquez – bass Ali Jackson Jr. – drums

“These songs, heard this way with this group—that’s never been done before. Whatever I’m doing, if you put Wynton and these guys around it, that brings it up to a different level.” – Willie Nelson

A first-time collaboration between two American icons, Willie & Wynton discover common ground in their love of jazz standards & the blues on this sparkling set that brims with spontaneity, congeniality & fun.

www.newsweek.com

Wynton wears crisp suits, reads sheet music and is the musical director of New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center. Willie wears crumpled jeans, wings it onstage and runs his concert venue, Willie’s Place, out of a truck stop in Abbott, Texas.

So what exactly do these music legends have in common? The blues, of course. Wynton Marsalis, 46, and Willie Nelson, 75, are the two men on the new CD “Two Men With the Blues,” a live recording culled from two concerts they played at Lincoln Center last year.

“I like playing with Wynton,” says Nelson, “because you know the piano player won’t show up drunk, and whatever comes out of it, it’ll be worth the listen.” They are playing venues including the Hollywood Bowl and “The Tonight Show” between breaks on Nelson’s tour and Marsalis’s Lincoln Center duties. Recently, the two chatted with NEWSWEEK’s Lorraine Ali in Nelson’s second home—his airbrushed, tricked-out tour bus:

ALI: Your collaboration has been described as “a summit meeting between two American icons.”

NELSON: I like the way they put that.

MARSALIS: I’m not an icon, he is.

NELSON: I thought an icon was one of those things on your computer screen. I’m not one of those.

MARSALIS: OK, I say this modestly—this is a historic event. It’s not a big surprise to have Wynton and Willie playing together, but to have this much attention for it, that’s a surprise.

But the attention makes sense: both of you are highly respected, and Willie, you can’t go anywhere without being recognized. NELSON: I’m offended if I don’t get recognized. I say, “Hey, man, don’t you know who I am? Perhaps you didn’t realize.”

MARSALIS: My son always says, “I want to repudiate you, Dad, but nobody knows who you are. When I have to explain who I’m repudiating, it’s not really worth it.”

Willie, I imagine you as an off-the-cuff player, but with Wynton, there’s the whole issue of keeping time. Is that a problem?

NELSON: Well, it’s a little different than when we just go up there and wing it for four hours and play requests. This has to be exactly right, especially because Wynton and the guys are reading off pieces of paper, and I’m just up there trying to remember words. These guys have a lot more to do and think about than I do. For me, it’s a free ride on top of their rhythm and rockin’.

MARSALIS: He’ll come in with a phrase, and we’ll think, “Uh-oh, he ain’t gonna make it fit.” And then he’ll collect it on the back end. It’s like somebody jukin’ or fakin’ on a basketball court. They take you this way, then come back that way. He’ll come in perfectly on key, on time, and we’re, like, “Damn!” It’s so natural and true.

Do you see yourself as an odd couple?

MARSALIS: No. As musicians, we like a lot of the same things.

NELSON:Â Louis Jordan’s “Caldonia.”

MARSALIS: Yeah, that’s right, or “Saturday Night Fish Fry.” See, we came up on the same sounds

Music aside, personality-wise, how is it working together? Is one of you…

NELSON: On drugs?

That’s not exactly where I was going.

MARSALIS: We really follow each other. I think we’re gracious that way. There’s no crazy soloing over one another.

NELSON: We [Nelson and his harmonica player] can’t play anything more than they [Marsalis and his quartet] can play. There’s only so many chords, and they know ‘em better than we do. Honestly, I don’t read music that well. Or I don’t read well enough to hurt my playing, as the old joke goes.

MARSALIS: And it’s not like we need to translate. We’re coming from the same American experience. The songs he picked to play,”Bright Lights, Big City,” “Basin Street Blues”we don’t need an arrangement for those. The grooves we play are shuffle grooves, swing. We grew up playing that music. There wasn’t one time where we had to stop and say, “Willie, what do you mean?” We are together.

NELSON: Even though some of us may not look all that together.

I heard you two barely rehearse.

MARSALIS: Willie doesn’t do two or three takes. Just once, and then, “That’s good, gentlemen.” That’s how we play. We record live.

NELSON: If you can play, then what do you want to rehearse for? Just play.

Willie, you still tour like mad. How different are the shows with Wynton?

NELSON: Honestly, it’s a lot easier for me to come out and work with Wynton and his guys, because in my shows I’ll go out and play for two hours or more. With Wynton, they’ve already played for an hour and a half before I come out. I come out and do the last 30 minutes, and all of a sudden I’ve had a great night.

Wynton, was there any sort of intimidation factor in working with a legend like Willie?

MARSALIS: I’ve been around musicians all my life. My daddy was a musician, and we played all kind of gigs. I played with philharmonic orchestras when I was 22 years old. That’s intimidating! This man is natural. He makes you feel at home. When he comes to rehearsal, there’s not 65 people around him, scurrying to make it all right.

NELSON: Send in the dogs to clear the place out first.

MARSALIS: It’s not like that. He’s very approachable.

NELSON: We used to work in clubs where we had to build up the crowd. We’d hop from table to table, have a drink with everybody, hoping they’d show up tomorrow night. By the time you made your rounds you’re about half drunk.

MARSALIS: How could you not love this man?

Willie Nelson: American Classic

Monday, April 14th, 2014

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  • The Nearness of you
  • Fly Me to the Moon
  • Come Rain or Come Shine
  • If I Had You (with Diana Krall)
  • Ain’t Misbehaving
  • I Miss You So
  • Because of You
  • Baby, It’s Cold Outside (with Norah Jones)
  • Angel Eyes
  • On the Street Where You Live
  • Since I Fell For You
  • You Were Always on My Mind

classic2 by you.

Monday, April 14th, 2014

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Thanks to Phil Weisman, for sending along this photo from his collection of Willie Nelson photos. I love this picture.

Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow, “You Remain”

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Glenn Campbell, Kenny Rogers

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

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And then there was Willie Nelson

Monday, April 7th, 2014

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“Sunday Mornin’ Comin’ Down” Willie Nelson Sings Kristofferson

Sunday, April 6th, 2014

Who better to start your Sunday off, than with Willie Nelson singing Kris Kristofferson?

“The Highwaymen” @ Farm Aid 1985 (with Glen Campbell)

Saturday, April 5th, 2014

The Highwaymen, with Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Glen Campbell sing “Highwayman” at Farm Aid in Champaign, Illinois on September 22, 1985.

Willie Nelson and Alison Krauss & Union Station 2014 Tour

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

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photos:  Jim Dyson/Kevork Djansezian,

http://tasteofcountry.com
by: Christina Vinson

 Willie Nelson and Alison Krauss & Union Station are joining forces for their first-ever co-headlining tour.

The two icons will be touring together throughout the spring and summer, hitting up 35 cities in the United States. The run will kick off on May 1 in Murray, Ken., with its last stop in Toledo, Ohio on July 18.

Nelson and Krauss’ tour marks the first time the first time the pair of legends have shared the stage. They’ll be hitting the road with their two full bands, Willie Nelson and Family and Alison Krauss and Union Station, featuring Jerry Douglas.

Two of country music’s most iconic talents in one stop? Yes, please.

The tour is sure to be unforgettable, as the two icons’ unique personalities and phenomenal musicianship — along with their respective long list of award-winning songs — will be something no country fan should miss.

The talent won’t stop at the headliners, either. Joining for separate portions of the tour will be folk trio the Devil Makes Three, two-time Grammy winner Kacey Musgraves and celebrated songwriter Jason Isbell.

Alison Krauss and Willie Nelson 2014 Tour Dates:

5/1 – Murray, Ken. CFSB Center/Murray State University
5/2 – Atlanta, Ga. | Chastain Park Amphitheatre
5/3 – Knoxville, Tenn. | Thompson Boling Arena
5/4 – Cary, N.C. | Koka Booth Amphitheatre
5/6 – St. Augustine, Fla. | St. Augustine Amphitheatre
5/8 – Daniel Island, S.C. | Family Circle Cup Stadium
5/9 – Simpsonville, S.C. | Charter Amphitheatre
5/10 – Greensboro, N.C. | White Oak Amphitheatre
5/11 – Huntington, W.V. | Big Sandy Superstar Arena
5/13 – Roanoke, Va. | Roanoke Civic Center
5/14 – Columbus, Ohio | Schottenstein Center
5/16 – Nashville, Tenn. | The Woods at Fontanel
5/17 – Birmingham, Ala. | BJCC
5/18 – Augusta, Ga. | James Brown Arena
6/5 – Southaven, Miss. | Snowden Grove Amphitheater
6/6 – Louisville, Ken. | Waterfront Park
6/7 – Lewiston, N.Y. | Artpark
6/8 – Bethel, N.Y. | Bethel Woods Center For the Arts
6/10 –  New York, N.Y. | Radio City Music Hall
6/13 – Philadelphia, Penn. | Mann Center
6/14 – Columbia, Md. | Merriweather Post Pavilion
6/15 – Simsbury, Ct. | Simsbury Meadows
6/17 – Boston, Mass. | Blue Hills Bank Pavilion
6/19 – Bangor, Maine | Darling’s Waterfront Pavilion
6/20 – Gilford, N.H. | Bank of NH Pavillion at Meadowbrook
6/21 – Canandaigua, N.Y. | CMAC Performing Arts Center
7/6 – Kansas City, Mo. | Starlight Theatre
7/7 – Rogers, Ariz. | Arkansas Music Pavilion
7/9 – Oklahoma City, Okla. | Zoo Amphitheatre
7/11 – Council Bluffs, Iowa | Harrah’s Stir Cove
7/12 – Chicago, Ill. | Ravinia Festival
7/13 – Detroit, Mich. | Freedom Hill
7/15 – Rama, Ontario | Casino Rama
7/17 – Interlochen, Mich. | Kresge Auditorium
7/18 – Toledo, Ohio | Toledo Zoo

 

Willie Nelson in solidarity with people of Appalachia

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

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http://enewspf.com/latest-news

Country music legend Willie Nelson is joining the fight in Congress to protect Appalachian communities from the impacts of the devastating mining practice of mountaintop removal.

In a new music video that depicts dynamiting operations in Appalachia and their ruinous consequences, the American icon sings “America the Beautiful” to highlight opposition to giving coal companies free rein to blast the tops off mountains and dump dangerous pollution into surrounding streams and creeks.

The House of Representatives will vote on a bill Tuesday that would make it easier to dump the tons of toxic waste and debris from these mountaintop mining operations into Appalachian streams.

“Willie Nelson is a strong voice for everyday Americans, as shown by his solidarity with the people of Appalachia,” said Jon Devine, senior attorney in NRDC’s Water Program. “This legislation would clear the way for more destruction and more pollution. It must be stopped.”

Nelson, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors, and first winner of the Country Music Association Lifetime Achievement Award, has long championed the people and communities of rural America with his Farm Aid concerts.

The video, produced by the Natural Resources Defense Council, features Nelson’s song playing over scenes of wooded Appalachian mountains being dynamited by coal companies and the resulting boulders, ash and sludge cascading down on to communities below.

The bill scheduled for Tuesday’s House of Representatives vote, HR 2824, would lock in place a George W. Bush-era rule change that opened up local streams to the pollution caused by the ravages of mountaintop mining. Under this practice, companies are blasting off entire mountaintops to get at the thin coal seams below. They’re filling local rivers and streams with blasted debris, and sacrificing the safety and sanctity of countless communities in the region.

Mountaintop removal mining has already leveled more than 500 mountaintops, poisoned or buried over 2,000 miles of streams, and destroyed communities across Appalachia. Top scientists agree that the ecological damage of mountaintop removal is largely irreversible.

For more background on mountaintop removal, see: http://switchboard.nrdc.org/mountaintopremoval.php

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The Natural Resources Defense Council is a national, nonprofit organization of scientists, lawyers and environmental specialists dedicated to protecting public health and the environment. Founded in 1970, NRDC has 1.2 million members and online activists, served from offices in New York, Washington, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Beijing.

Willie Nelson Art, by Billy Austin

Monday, March 24th, 2014

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Willie Nelson, Lily Meola, “Will You Remember Mine” (SXSW iTunes Festival)

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

ACL Live at Moody Theater
iTunes Festival
Balcony View

Andrew Bernstein dishes on Willie Nelson, Jerry Garcia and more in, “California Slim”

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

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The story begins in 1962 with Andy and his then unknown banjo teacher, a young Jerry Garcia, finger picking in a back room at a music studio in Palo Alto, and ends in 1980 with Andy sharing joints and good times with the Willie Nelson Family. A skinny six-foot-seven-inch Jewish kid (later known as “California Slim”), Andy divided his time between the usual adolescent interests and music, for which he would go on to provide a capital M by promoting and staging concerts throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. His Palo Alto nightclub, Homer’s Warehouse, across the street from Stanford University, brought revolutionary musicians to young sensibilities hungry for new driving rhythms.

www.digitaljournal.com

Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart once said, “There was a community in need of music, and music in need of a community.” That community was San Francisco in the ’60s and ’70s, and that music was rock ‘n’ roll.

Presenting every baby boomer’s musical dream, Andrew Bernstein’s “California Slim” takes readers on a mesmerizing behind-the-scenes psychedelic journey through San Francisco’s cultural and musical revolution.

The book provides a real taste of rock ‘n’ roll history, from the moment Bernstein was a 14-year-old kid taking banjo lessons from an unknown music teacher named Jerry Garcia, to the red carpet premier of Willie Nelson’s first movie, “Honeysuckle Rose.”

“California Slim: The Music, the Magic, and the Madness” By Andrew Bernstein ISBN: 978-1-4797-7045-8 Available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Xlibris online bookstores

About the Author In 1969, Andrew Bernstein began working as a creative partner in Crimson Madness, a producer of light shows at Bill Graham’s famed Fillmore West. Bernstein also worked with the legendary B.B. King, Albert King, Iron Butterfly, Boz Skaggs, Grateful Dead, Original Fleetwood Mac, Willie Nelson and many others. He currently resides in San Francisco.

John Varvatos Stuart House Benefit, featuring Willie Nelson, Lukas Nelson, Micah Nelson (4/13/14)

Monday, March 17th, 2014

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Online Auction:  charitybuzz.com/johnvarvatos

Johnny Depp joins Willie Nelson on stage in Austin

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

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www.examiner.com
photo and storyby:  Suzanne Cordeiro

Living legend Willie Nelson hit the Main Stage of Rodeo Austin on Sunday, March 9 and mega star Johnny Depp joined him on stage to perform his entire set.   Johnny is not only an incredible actor and film producer, but also an accomplished musician.  Johnny Depp has been playing guitar since he was a child and it is not uncommon to find him performing with a variety of notable musicians.  For an Austin, Texas gig during SXSW however, playing lead guitar alongside Willie Nelson might just be the coolest gig ever.

See more stories, and the rest of the article here.